Fun & Engaging SH Sound Speech Therapy Activities

Fun & Engaging SH Sound Speech Therapy Activities

I recently had a third grade group in which all of my students were working on the /sh/ sound. At first, I was relieved to plan a session all around one sound. When I looked closer, I realized my students were all at different “stages” in working on the sh sound. It was one of their first sessions working on the sh sound, another was working on it in the middle of words and the third was working on it in sentences. This is our job as SLPs, but it made me really brainstorm some ideas so that all of my students felt successful, challenged and most importantly, motivated. Here is my list of SH sound speech therapy activities from elicitation to conversation. 

 

This blog post contains Amazon affiliate links for your convenience. I receive a small commission at no additional cost to you.

SH Sound Speech Therapy Resources for Elicitation

First off, we need to elicit the SH sound all by itself. Here are some helpful resources for teaching the sh sound in speech therapy. 

Learn resources to help you produce the SH sound in speech therapy

SH Syllable and Word Speech Therapy Activities

Get this free SH sound syllable printable for speech therapy

Once I’ve elicited the sound in isolation, I’ll start working on the /sh/ sound in syllables and words. As all SLPs know, we continuously have to push our students to the next level so they’re making progress all while feeling successful and challenged. (Quite the balancing act)

 

    Word Lists and Word Level Activities

        Have SH word lists for your speech therapy sessions with these no print articulation activity flipbooks

        Sound Loaded SH Phrases & Sentence Ideas

        Get ideas for working on SH in your articulation speech therapy sessions.

        Now that your student has SH in words, get working on the sound in phrases and sentences!

        • Make sound-loaded phrases with your students on paper that you can practice in the session and then take home for the weekly homework. For example, you can use the phrase “Let me show you the ____.” Then, students think of different words. They don’t have to have an /sh/ because the word your student will be working on is “show.” When using mixed groups, give them a category group to name items. Here are some more examples for sound loaded phrases:
          • “She has a ___.”
          • “I want to share the ___.”
          • “We need to wash the ___.”
          • “Add ___ to the shopping list.”

          Sentence Level Articulation Ideas for the SH Sound

          • If you do a theme-based approach, you can do this activity but use the theme’s vocabulary. See this IG for more details
          • Compare and contrast similar nouns that contain the sh sound. For example, goldfish and shark,  or shovel and brush would be great SH words to compare. If you need pre-selected compare-and-contrast flashcards, check out the SH, CH, J articulation carryover set
          • Have your students create tongue twisters with your word lists that they can practice. You can even have them illustrate  tongue twister to make a fun speech sound book. For example, you could use “Shelly shared shells at the shore” or “She shouldn’t wash dishes with a shovel.” ChatGPT would be a great way to get more SH tongue twisters quickly!
          • You can make alliteration SH poems and then students can draw their poem.
          • Play guessing games for secret words that only have the SH sound. Add in carrier phrases for people to use, like “You surely won’t guess this word! It is especially tricky,” or “You sure are correct,” or “You should guess again.”
          SH sound sentence level activities for articulation therapy.

          Speech Therapy Crafts for the SH Sound

          SH words for speech therapy using easy articulation crafts.

          During your students’ journey up the ladder, it’s always fun to incorporate crafts so your students can decorate a bulletin board in your room or bring home a piece of work to share with their caregivers. Here are some craft ideas:

           

          • Make speech sound wallets that they can store in their speech folders or use to practice at home. 
          • I love doing crafts with my students but I prefer something that’s quick and easy to prep. The paper plate challenge craft is just this for a SH sound speech therapy craft.
          • Make some milkshake craft or a shape craft to use for practicing the SH sound.
          • Have students decorate their own shirt, shorts, or shoes! Sketch the shape of their clothing item on paper, cut it out, and have them decorate. They can decorate with /sh/ words or more craft materials (stickers, bingo daubers, crayons, etc). 

          Articulation Games with the SH Sound

          Most of our speech students are always asking to play a game when they come to speech. There are plenty of options for /sh/ sound games.

          • There are so many games with natural opportunities for SH sound to help keep kids motivated. 
          • Play Pinball on Toy Theater and practice words like “Push,” “Shoot,” and “Shake.”
          • On ABCYa, make a face and practice words or phrases like “She has…,” “Should I give the face…”

          Count fish in ABCYa’s Counting Fish game or dash through a dungeon in ABCYa’s Dungeon Dash (there are also versions with numbers, shapes and colors!). 

          SH articulation games that will help you get high trials.

          Where to Find SH Sound Loaded Stories

          Get ideas for SH sound loaded articulation stories and reading passages for carryover.

          If your student is a reader, incorporate SH sound-loaded reading passages into your therapy sessions. 

          SH Sound Conversation Activities

          Once your student has shown consistent success for /sh/ in sentences (and reading or retell), time to focus on generalization of the sound in conversation. While having a conversation can seem like the most straightforward task, ensuring that your student uses /sh/ sounds in the speech therapy conversation activities can feel tricky. Here are some ideas:

          • I linked this before, but make sure to check out my SH Sound conversation activities for some low-prep ideas. 
          • Find more sound-loaded non-fiction articles to read aloud. Discuss them afterward with your students. How much can they retell you? (There are non-fiction passages in the SH carryover activities.)
          • Make sound loaded questions, or would you rather games
            • Make a game like “What should I do?” and make up silly scenarios that students have to explain what you “should” or “shouldn’t” do.
            • Have students read the directions of a game, or read the cards while playing a game like Bubble Talk.
            • Create a list of words that start with the SH sound (shopping, shark, dishes, washing, brush, flush) then have students make silly sentences or create a story trying to get the sound-loaded words in the story.
          Help your student's graduate with SH articulation carryover activities

          What Articulation Activities Do You Love to Plan for SH?

          While we generally follow the same sequence of steps with sounds, it can be tricky to think of activities for each sound and each step. I hope these ideas help keep your students motivated and/or help you think of some more speech therapy SH sound activities. What else is in your SH sound toolkit? SHare with us on social media!

          100 Trials for Speech Therapy – Tools You Need Ep 100

          100 Trials for Speech Therapy – Tools You Need Ep 100

          Whether you work in the school or private practice setting, many SLPs serve students with a speech sound disorder diagnosis. For many approaches for apraxia, articulation, and phonology, you need to get a high dose of trials in your sessions to see improvements in producing the correct sound in spontaneous speech. But let’s face it. Keeping students motivated to practice 100 trials for speech therapy sessions can be hard. Kids can get easily bored or frustrated with getting 100 trials or more in a session. So, this episode is here to help you learn about some new articulation therapy tools and materials to ensure you get 100 trials for your speech sessions every time!

          Amazon affiliate links are provided for your convenience. When you purchase an item with my affiliate link, I receive a small commission.

          100 Trials Speech Therapy Materials Mentioned in the Episode:

          100-trials-for-speech-therapy
          1. Abacus or DIY version to get 100 trials for speech sound goals
          2. Magnetic wand
          3. High number die – play the points game and set certain numbers as bonus points, or amounts the child loses, multiples, etc. Whoever has the most points at the end of the session wins.
          4. Challenge sheets and timer – use a piece of paper with a timer and count how many trials the child gets in a minute. Then, do it for another minute to see if they can beat their score. If you need articulation worksheets, check out the sentence challenge worksheets.
          5. Tally clickers – if you don’t want to hear clicking noises, get the digital set.
          6. Race to 100 game (free printable) or use the Race to 100 trials for speech games in the digital speech folders.
          7. Ultra fine dry-erase markers with any of your articulation therapy worksheets. Just place the page in a page protector and use it with the dry-erase markers. Students love using these articulation flipbooks. You can try the L articulation flipbook for free.

          Easy to Implement Articulation Therapy Activities for 100 Trials

           

            1. Picture scenes – Do I spy hunts for their sound and then have your students practice their sound in words or sentences.
            2. Jar and pom pom balls
            3. Popsicle sticksZap it game, stickers, dots that’s how many you productions you do
            4. Dixie paper cups – build towers while you have students practice their speech sounds.
            5. Tiny decisions App – you can add your students speech sounds in words, and the spinner tells them which word they will practice next.
            6. Dot markers – use with crafts or on paper – draw their sound as a bubble letter, and then they dot mark it.
            7. Legos or blocks
            8. Cars and cardboard
          100-trials-for-speech-therapy

          What Articulation Therapy Activities Do You Plan?

          Do you have any articulation therapy activities or tools that you use to help keep your students motivated to practice their speech sounds? Share your favorite tools and activities for 100 trials speech therapy sessions to help out other SLPs. Check out this system for how to keep your manipulatives and tools together in one spot with a speech sound container.

          EP.100 One Hundred Trials for Speech Therapy - Tools You Need

          by The Dabbling Speechie

          Speech Therapy S Sound Activities and Articulation Games

          Speech Therapy S Sound Activities and Articulation Games

          I still remember my first client in graduate school working on the /s/ sound. I spent hours preparing S Sound activities for our sessions. It’s genuinely wild to think about how long I’d spend planning for these sessions compared to the time I spend planning sessions now! Looking back at it now, this was just the start of my SLP Toolbox, and it will never stop growing. I’ve compiled a speech therapy S Sound activity list from my toolkit in this blog post! 

          This blog post contains Amazon affiliate links for your convenience. I receive a small commission at no additional cost to you.

           

          Speech Therapy S Sound Resources for Elicitation

          Learn about resources for the s and z articulation sounds to use in therapy!

          The goal of the very first treatment session? Elicit the /s/ sound in isolation. I spent so much time preparing activities and lists of cues to help him produce it! I still use the cue “lock your tongue up behind your teeth!” when helping my current students. Here are even more ideas.

           

          • You can find tips for elicitation and picture cards for the S Sound on Speech & Language at Home
          • Check out the The Marshalla Guide for loads of tips for producing many sounds including the S sound. 
          • If you need visuals, word lists and tips for eliciting the S sound, check out this Speech Sound Handbook from Peachie Speechie
          • Watch this video to show your students how to say S from Peachie Speechie.
          • When working with lateral lisps, watch this video from Peachie Speechie and read this blog post from Amy Graham.
          • Another favorite of mine for /s/ sound in isolation is super simple-yarn and space! Hold the spool of yarn while your students hold the end of it. As students make and hold the /s/ sound, walk and un-roll the spool of yarn. See how long your student can make the /s/ sound by cutting the yarn when they finish and measure the length of the yarn.  

          S Syllable and Word Speech Therapy Activities

          Once established in isolation, it’s time to think about S words for speech therapy. Here are some ideas to help you with sessions with your students.

          Get speech therapy s sound activities to help you get high trials and keep sessions fun!

          S Words for Speech Therapy

          Get speech therapy s sound activities to help you get high trials and keep sessions fun!

          Here are even more activities for S words articulation practice.

          • Home Speech Home has a word list for S for words to use during your sessions.  
          • Another activity is to make sound-loaded phrases with your students on paper that you can practice in the session and then take home for the weekly homework.
            • For example, you can use the phrase “I see  ______.” Then, students think of different words. They don’t have to have an S because the word your student will be working on is “see.” When using mixed groups, give them a category group to name items. 
            • If you’re doing a theme-based approach, you can do this activity but use the theme’s vocabulary. See this IG for more details
            • Here are more examples for sound loaded phrases:
              • Sam wants ________
              • _____ is in the recipe.
              • Pass _____ to _____.
              • Put ____ on your face.
          • Harre SLP has a free Fun zoo articulation map. Students can talk about what they see and like at the Zoo. You can pair this with fun toys to make it more interactive!

          S Articulation Sentence Worksheets and Activities

          • Compare and contrast similar nouns that contain the S sound. For example, soccer, baseball, popsicle, and ice cream would be great S words to compare. Check out the S and Z articulation carryover set if you need pre-selected compare-and-contrast flashcards
          • Play a sentence articulation challenge game that keeps the student motivated to practice high trials in a short amount of time. 
          • Have your students create tongue twisters with your word lists that they can practice. You can even have them illustrate their tongue twister to make a fun speech sound book. For example, you could use “The snake slithered silently through the grass” or “Sam’s silly socks are stylish.”
          • Make alliteration S poems, and then students can draw their poems. 
          • Play guessing games for secret words that only have the S sound. Add in carrier phrases for students to use, like “My best guess is…” or “Listen carefully before you answer.” 
          Get your kids excited to practice their s sounds with ideas for s articulation worksheets and activities.

          Speech Therapy Crafts for the S Sound

          Need some s words speech therapy activities? This blog post has lots of easy activities for your speech therapy sessions.

          Crafts are a great way to keep kids engaged during sessions, get repetition of their sounds, and a great way to show their caregivers what they’re working on in speech! Here are some craft ideas for S sound articulation.

           

          Articulation Games with the S Sound

          “Are we going to play a game today?” is a phrase every pediatric SLP hears quite often. Here are some ideas for you when your students ask this golden question. 

          Have s and z words for your speech therapy sessions and activities to do that will get high trials in your sessions!

          S Sound Conversation Activities

          Speech Therapy S sound activities for easy planning to work on S in conversation.

          At last, it’s time to work on the /s/ sound in conversation. The /s/ sound occurs so frequently in our language so ideas for this level are endless! Here are some more ideas for speech therapy s sound. 

          • Try these S and Z Sound conversation activities to save yourself prep time and provide your students with a fun way to practice the /s/ sound. 
          • Use sound-loaded non-fiction articles to read aloud and discuss. 
          • Make sound loaded questions or play “Would You Rather?”
            • Have students answer questions “Would you try…” and they can answer “Yes” or “pass.”
          • Have students read the directions of a game, or read the cards while playing a game like Bubble Talk
          • Create a list of words that start with the S sound (city, sand, race, messy, whistle, mouse, sick) then have students make silly sentences or create a story trying to get the sound-loaded words in the story.

          It’s safe to say my toolbox s sound activities has expanded since my first client in graduate school, and of course it just keeps growing! What are some of your favorite activities when working on the /s/ sound? Leave a comment or tag us on social media!

          Speech Therapy L Sound Activities That Are Effective!

          Speech Therapy L Sound Activities That Are Effective!

          All our students learn so differently. One student may respond to a cue we always use, but another may struggle to produce their target sound. There’s always a new trick to learn and an activity to add to our toolbox. I wrote this speech therapy L sound articulation post to help add to your toolbox, to use as your call for backup during a busy week, and whatever else you might need to work on the L sound in syllables, words, sentences, reading, and conversation. 

           

          This blog post contains Amazon affiliate links for your convenience. I receive a small commission at no additional cost to you.

          Resources for Teaching the L Sound in Speech Therapy

          First step, elicit that L sound. Here are some helpful links for this first step.

            Speech-therapy-L-sound-activities

            L Sound in Isolation and Syllables

            speech-therapy-L-sound
            • Once you’ve elicited the L sound, practice it in isolation. You can use this free printable from Adventures in Speech Pathology to get repeated practice with the L sound in isolation. Don’t forget to grab some dot markers, crayons, or markers for your students to color as they practice! 

             

             

            Speech Therapy L Sounnd Words Activities

            Next on the L Articulation to do list? Practice the L sound in syllables and words! Here are some ideas.

             

            • Keep everything in one place with these L activities speech therapy digital folders. You can easily customize quick drill activities for your in-person and teletherapy sessions. The digital folders include links to websites, YouTube videos, Google Slides, progress monitoring tools, and PDFs.

             

             

            • These FREE Speech Therapy L Word Activities Books will help get those high trials in with activities and word lists. Print, laminate, cut them out and keep them together with binder clips. No time to prep? Use the L word activity books on your iPad or computer!

             

             

            L-word-list-speech-therapy

            More L Articulation Therapy Ideas

            L-words-for-speech-therapy
            • Print out L speech word picture cards and use them for I spy games, drills, sensory bins, and more articulation activities your students enjoy! 

             

            • For kids who need movement or games that are sound-loaded, Home Speech Home has a few great suggestions. 

             

             

            • Play Lids N’ Lizards!  Head to the blog for some free printables to use this game throughout the year. 

            L Articulation Sentence Activities

            Finding that your students are ready to work on L in sentences? Here are some ideas for you!

            • Make L sound-loaded phrases with your students on paper that you can practice in the session. Then, your students can take this paper home for weekly homework.

             

            • For example, you can use the phrase “Look at the ______.” Then, students think of different words. They don’t have to have an L because the word your student will be working on is “look.” When using mixed groups, give them a category group to name items.
            • If you’re doing a theme-based approach, you can do this activity but use the themed vocabulary. See this IG for more details

             

            • Compare and contrast similar nouns that contain the L sound. For example, lemon and lime or pool and lake would be great L words to compare. If you need pre-selected compare-and-contrast flashcards, check out the L articulation carryover set
            L-sound-speech-therapy
            L-words-for-speech-therapy

             

            • With your words lists, have your students create tongue twisters that they can practice. You can even have them illustrate their tongue twister to make a fun speech sound book. For example, you could use “Lucy loves long walks around the lake” or “Lionel left his lunch in his locker.”

             

            • Play guessing games for secret words that only have the L sound. Add in carrier phrases for people to use like “My lips are sealed, but here is a clue: ______” 

            Speech Therapy Crafts for the L Sound

            Many kids get super motivated when they have created something of their own. I’ve made a list of some fun L sound crafts for you and your students.

            • Make speech sound wallets that your students can store in their speech folders or use for practice at home. 

             

             

            • With construction paper, glue, markers and a hole punch, your students can create this cute ladybug hole punch craft from Speech Sprouts. Each time you practice a word, they can punch a new hole in the ladybug wings!
            L-articulation-activities

            L Sound Conversation Activities

            When your students have mastered the sentence level, it’s time for reading and conversation!

            • My L and L-blend conversation activities includes data sheets, short stories, non-fiction passages, compare and contrast cards, conversation starters, sequencing cards, problem solving bingo and a mystery delivery activity. It also includes a digital option for all activities included! 
            • Use some L sound-loaded non-fiction articles for students to read aloud. 
              • Check out Wonderopolis and readworks.org for more L sound-loaded articles. For example, students can read about Abraham Lincoln or about lizards.
            • Make sound loaded questions or would you rather games using the L sound. For example, you can ask “What do you LIKE more?” 
            • Have students read the directions of a game, or read the cards while playing a game like Bubble Talk

            Create a list of words that start with the L sound (laugh, lazy, lion, learn, like, look, light, large, leg) then have students make silly sentences or create a story trying to get the sound-loaded words in the story.

            L-articulation-activities-conversation

            Progress Monitoring Tools for the L Sound

            L-articulation-words-progress-monitoring

            If you need quick data checks for updates on your L sound speech therapy goals, check out the L progress monitoring Google Slide and Forms in the L digital speech folder. If you are working on minimal pairs for gliding or cluster reduction, there are also progress monitoring tools for those sound pairs. 

            What Speech Therapy L Sound Activities do You Plan?

            I hope this post gave you some new ideas for cues, activities and resources when working on the L sound at all levels. There are so many ways we can work on speech sounds with our students and different ways we can support them in and out of sessions. What have you been doing during sessions to keep your students engaged while working on the L sound? Share in the comments or tag us on social to share your ideas!

            speech-therapy-for-L-sound
            Syllable Level Articulation Visual Cue Sheet

            Syllable Level Articulation Visual Cue Sheet

            We’ve all heard or said, “walk before you run!” As SLPs, we know it’s the same for speech. We learn to say smaller syllables like “sah” or smaller words like “sat” before we say multisyllabic words like “Saturday.” It’s that golden ladder speech sound hierarchy that all SLPs learned and often live by when treating speech delays and articulation disorders. We start by establishing the sound in isolation for our students with speech sound disorders. It might be tricky to decide on syllables or words from there. If we go to syllables, how can we keep our support of our students at this level while also keeping them engaged? My FREE tool, Syllable Level Articulation Activity Worksheet, can help with that. 

            Traditional Articulation Therapy Approach Refresh

            Following the traditional articulation therapy approach, we move from the smallest unit (a single phoneme) and gradually climb up the speech sound hierarchy. If you remember from grad school, the articulation hierarchy follows this system:

            • Sounds in isolation
            • Syllables
            • Words
            • Phrases 
            • Sentences
            • Reading Paragraphs
            • Conversation
            • Generalization across settings and people

            Often, we’ll move right from the isolation level to words. When following the traditional articulation therapy approach, however, we should have the child practice their articulation productions in syllables. By removing the contextualized context, drilling their speech sound in syllables allows the student to focus on the motor patterns. Need more of a refresher on the traditional articulation therapy approach? Check out my blog post about it here.

            If you need a visual articulation hierarchy chart, check this free one out from Allison Fors.

            Where to Start With Articulation Therapy

            Before grabbing the worksheet, you’ll need to determine where to start with your student. The best way to decide where to begin in therapy is to complete baseline testing about where the child is correctly producing the sound. The SLP can determine if the child can discriminate a correct versus incorrect sound production. Then, the SLP can assess if the sound is stimulable in isolation, syllables, words, and so forth. Once you’ve determined their baseline, it’s time to help them climb that ladder!

             

            The Syllable Level Articulation Activity worksheet helps both our students and us. We can quickly plan for sessions with little to no prep. Grab the worksheet and

             Amazon affiliate links are provided for your convenience. 

            The worksheet helps provide a visual for students while they focus on the motor patterns with their new sound attached to short, long, or mixed vowels in CV or VC syllables.

            Tips for Using the Syllable Level Articulation Sheet

            Practicing syllables may seem “boring” or even “weird” to some students, but it’s an important step. Explain to your students that these are the building blocks for words. I once had a parent question why I practiced such simple words in therapy with their child. I took the time to explain that practicing their child’s speech sound in syllables would later prepare them for correct productions in multisyllabic words. For example, working on final /s/ syllables such as “ace” could help produce this syllable in acid, baseball, asymmetrical, racing, and replace. After, she was more open and appreciative of the CV and VC words. A few weeks later, she could hear these CV and VC syllables in longer words. Some of our students (or their parents or teachers) might need this explanation, too! For younger students, you should tell them that you’ll be practicing silly nonsense words during the session.

            Once you’ve explained your goal for the activity, it’s time to practice. You can pull out the worksheet for drilled practice before between turns in a game or craft. Cycle through each vowel before your student takes a turn. You could also have them repeat one vowel per turn. The choice is yours!

            syllable-level-articulation-activities-free-printable

            Additional Articulation Activity Ideas To Do With the Sheet

            syllable-level-articulation-activities

            If you’re doing more play-based therapy, brainstorm the syllables that might come up during play or that you want to use during the activity. Many of these CV or VC syllables are words that we use daily. For example:

            • Make a car GO. Put a GUY in the car. “Oh no, the car is covered in GOO!”
            • Do you SEE that dino? It is SO cool. What does the dino SAY? The dino’s name is SUE.
            • The dolls are IN the house. Oh NO, the cat is stuck ON the roof. NAH, we can get it down. Ouch! The doll fell on her KNEE. Look, here’s a NEW band-aid to help. Now she’s hungry and needs AN apple.
            • Create silly names for the characters (dolls, dinosaurs, animals, monsters, etc.) you’re using. My dino’s name is SAH! or This animal is POH!

            Ensure your worksheet is handy to help your student practice these syllables during play. When the worksheet is out during play, it allows your students to shift their attention to practice and provides a visual.

             

            Strategies for Incorporating Self Awareness

            Have the child rate their productions with visual supports. You can record your student producing their syllables and then have the student listen to the recording. The student can say or write down the words they said correctly or incorrectly.

            Make sure your positive and negative feedback is clear and specific. For example, you can say, “That was a perfect L.” or “Oops, our tongue wasn’t in the right position, so I didn’t hear an L sound.”

            Have your students visually see their performance at the end of the session by graphing how well they did or explaining which words they produced correctly.

            Once they’ve mastered this syllable level, it’s time for words with their target sound!

            Check out the printable and no-print articulation flipbooks if you need articulation word lists. They have word, phrase, and sentence-level practice. 

             

            Sticking At The Syllable Level A Little Longer

            Practicing at the syllable level provides our practice students with these essential building blocks to larger words. They can focus their energy on the motor plan for their new sounds. Planning sessions around such small syllables can be challenging. Still, the Syllable Level Articulation Activity Worksheet can help give students a visual when practicing during games, a craft, play, or more! How do you practice the syllable level of the Traditional Articulation Therapy Approach? Share your activities and tips in the comments!

            thedabblingspeechie