Best Ocean Books for Your Elementary Caseload

Best Ocean Books for Your Elementary Caseload

One of the most efficient ways to plan your themed therapy units is to find books that will cover different ages and skills.

Today, I wanted to share some of the BEST ocean books for your speech therapy elementary caseload. Planning extension activities is easier when you have a handful of themed books to pull from for treatment.

Plus, using books in therapy is a low prep material that works well for mixed groups.

Tips for Choosing Themed Books for Speech Therapy

It’s hard to give you ocean books that will perfectly fit your caseload’s needs because we all have different ages and needs for our students.

Typically, when choosing books, I consider how versatile the book is to adapt for different goals and ages and if I can use the book to cover therapy for two to four weeks.

When I search for themed books, I either aim to find stories that fit the ages I serve or cover skills I need to target. For example, if I have students working on wh-questions, CORE words, and needing predictive text, I may select Way Down Deep in the Deep Blue Sea by Jan Peck.

If you need some tips for effective shared book reading techniques to use when reading the story in therapy, check out this post

Amazon affiliate links will be provided throughout this blog post. I receive a small commission at no additional charge for you when you use the link to purchase items.

Ocean Books for Prek-1st Grade Levels

Here is a list of ocean books to use for with your elementary speech therapy caseload!

Commotion in the Ocean by Giles Andreae would be a great ocean book to use in speech therapy if you want to teach the category of ocean animals. Each page has information about the different animals and targets vocabulary and verbs related to each creature. There is fun rhyming prose with the text; however, there is a lot of text on each page. You can read chunks of the book across several sessions. Because there is a lot of text, there are many opportunities for finding words with your student’s speech sounds.

Way Down Deep in the Deep Blue Sea by Jan Peck provides a repetitive text that allows many opportunities to see and hear vocabulary words or target specific CORE words. This book greets each sea animal and says goodbye, which can provide practice with language for greetings.

Need Cheat Sheets for Your Ocean Books To Reference in Speech Therapy Sessions?

If you are running mixed groups and struggle with remembering what targets you can use for your group’s different goals, check out the themed book cheat sheets from the Themed Therapy SLP membership. Not only do you get book cheat sheets for each themed unit, but you also get various digital and printable materials to use as extension activities. Doors re-open July 22nd for the membership, so get on the waitlist HERE.

Ocean Books for 2nd-3rd Grade Levels

The Snail and the Whale by Julia Donaldson is a book choice for students working on story narrative elements.

This book also uses rhyming prose, which is excellent for working on phonological awareness skills.

In the story, the snail wants to go sail at sea and hitches a ride with the whale. Each page shares where the whale and the snail go, so the pictures highlight different things in the ocean.

Some skills you can target with this book are homophones, s-blends, word opposites (i.e., night/day, emotions), and basic concepts.

Dory Story by Jerry Pallotta is another book that works well for story narrative goals. It’s a tale about a boy who takes a dory into the ocean to explore. As the young boy rows out to sea, he sees different animals eating food, such as blue fish eating mackerels.

Here is a list of ocean books to use for with your elementary speech therapy caseload!

This book highlights ocean animals’ food chain and addresses why the boy’s grandfather says not to go out in the dory alone.

Ocean-Themed Books for Older Students

For older students, you can use these two books focusing on non-fiction text. Shark Lady by Jess Keating is the ultimate theme smash because it covers types of sharks, a woman scientist’s work, and the theme of finding beauty in something that others may find scary.

The Brilliant Deep: Rebuilding the World’s Coral Reefs by Kate Messner is about the works of environmental scientist Ken Nedimyer. This book teaches about the ocean and provides a theme of small acts individuals can do to help preserve the coral reef. Sea urchins

With rich vocabulary embedded in the book, you can target a lot of tier II vocabulary, comprehension, and discussions that spark personal connections to the reader.

What Ocean Books Do You Use in Speech Therapy?

What types of ocean-themed books do you recommend for SLPs serving Prek-5th grade? Share in the comments your recommendation and how you use that book in therapy. If you need more summer-themed book ideas, check out this blog post.

Want extension activities to use with your ocean-themed books? Check out these blog posts and resources to help you plan engaging therapy:

Ocean Sensory Bin

Ocean-Themed Crafts

Ocean Language Activities for K-2

Here is a list of ocean books to use for with your elementary speech therapy caseload!
Sneezy the Snowman Story Retell Prop Kit

Sneezy the Snowman Story Retell Prop Kit

When it comes to choosing a snowman book for your caseload, you want a book that has great pictures, and LOTS of language concepts to target. Plus, you have a lot of students working on comprehension and oral narration, you want a snowman book that targets story elements. Sneezy the Snowman by Maureen Wright ticks off all those boxes for me. It’s a great story that kids LOVE to hear. Today, I am going to share how you can make a Sneezy the Snowman story retell kit to make your sessions more engaging when working on speech or language goals. If you need more snowman-themed book ideas, head to this blog post! Amazon affiliate links are included in this post for your convenience, this means I get a small commission when you purchase anything from Amazon.

What is a Story Prop Kit?

Story prop kits are items related to the book that can be used to keep children engaged during the storybook experience. They can be in the form of felt character and vocabulary items for a storyboard or manipulatives related to the story.

Research has shown that when children retell the story in their own words, their comprehension improves. The two strategies that worked best were children giving a verbal recount of the story and enactment of the story given props.

By creating a story prop kit, you will be able to implement both of these strategies with Sneezy the Snowman!

Can you think of a few kids on your caseload that would love to have a story prop kit while working on narrative skills? These stories retell kits can be great for students with shortened attention spans, kids who love to touch items, and for your friends that will work when it feels more like a play activity!

Make a Sneezy the Snowman story retell prop kit to make working on language concepts and story elements more engaging in your speech therapy sessions.
Make a Sneezy the Snowman story retell prop kit to make working on language concepts and story elements more engaging in your speech therapy sessions.

Where Can I Find the Sneezy the Snowman Story Retell Props?

For your Sneezy the Snowman story retell kit, you definitely want a snowman, fire, green mug, hot tub, hot chocolate, and ice cream! Having some kid figurines could be great too.

You can always ask your family and friends on Facebook to see if they have any old toys they would want to donate to you and your caseload. Another way to acquire these toys on a budget is by asking parents on your caseload. There is always the Goodwill and garage sale hunt too! If you need some tips for planning themed therapy lessons on a budget, listen to episode 47 on the Real Talk SLP podcast for more tips. Fortunately, I had most of the items in other playsets!

For my story retell kit, I wanted a plush snowman and found it on Oriental Trading company. But, right now, it is not in stock, so you can find one on Amazon.

Grab a fire from Melissa and Doug camping set or this fisher price version on Amazon.

Use a coffee mug from your house or a cup from one of your tea sets.

Look for a metal tin can from Target, or Dollar Tree to be the hot tub.

If you own the Melissa and Doug ice cream set, just borrow the ice cream cones.

For kids, you can grab the little people sets or just borrow Lego people.

During the story, Sneezy melts and needs to be built again. You can find some felt snowmen kits like this one on Amazon (it’s really big) or you can use the build a snowman file folder printables from my snowman-themed language lesson plan guides.

Speech Therapy Ideas for How To Use The Story Prop Kit

Make a Sneezy the Snowman story retell prop kit to make working on language concepts and story elements more engaging in your speech therapy sessions.

This book is great for story elements, but there are some other great ways you can use this book!

For your students working on CORE words, you can target “like, “put,” “you,” and “more.”

There are a lot of instances to talk about shades of meaning with the words hot and cold and describing words to show when someone is really cold.

If you have students with s-blend goals, this is a great book to target consonant clusters.

Practice naming items that would go in the hot and cold category group.

Target “where” questions focusing on prepositions for the location of Sneezy throughout the book.

How Would You Use This Story Prop Kit in Speech Therapy?

Do your students love Sneezy the Snowman? What types of goals or activities would you do with this story prop kit? I would love to know your ideas! Whenever I can find new ways to use a set of materials, it always makes therapy planning easier. If you can use this one story prop kit with a bulk of your caseload, you are saving LOTS of hours of prep work.

Share in the comments your therapy ideas for using Sneezy the snowman!

Need some more snowman ideas? Here are some blog posts to help you plan a snowman themed therapy unit:

Favorite Snowman Books for Speech Therapy

Snowman Toys to Use in Speech Therapy

Snowman Speech Therapy Ideas for Early Elementary

Snowman Paper Plate Craft with FREE Visual Supports

Snowman Sequencing Activities to Build Language

Make your own Sneezy the Snowman Story Retell Prop Kit to work on oral narration as a hands-on speech therapy activity.
Favorite Snowman Books for Speech Therapy

Favorite Snowman Books for Speech Therapy

One way to streamline your themed therapy lesson planning is to start by picking a book for the theme! Once you have a book selected, it’s much easier to come up with activities to use with that theme that also aligns with the book. Many times, a themed book has other opportunities to theme smash. For example, with a snowman theme, a great book to use for theme smashing is Snowmen at Work by Caralyn Buehler. You can use that book to discuss snowmen while also targeting a jobs or community helpers category! Today, I am going to share some of my favorite snowman books for speech therapy and give you some tips for selecting a book for your caseload.

Tips for Selecting a Snowman Book

When picking a book to use with your students, you want to ask yourself some questions:

1. What types of goals do my students have on their IEPs?

2. How long can my students attend to a book?

3. Can this book be adapted to cover a lot of different goals and discussions?

4. Is this a book that my students can personally relate to in their own life?

5. Is this book at their developmental level of interest?

It’s always good to select a snowman book that is going cover a lot of groups as well as serve many different skilled needs. For example, if you have a lot of students working on story retell, comprehension, grammar, and vocabulary, “Sneezy the Snowman” by Maureen Wright may be a great choice. This book follows story elements and has lots of opportunities for targeting vocabulary.

 

Similarly, if you have a lot of students working on building MLU and describing goals, using the book, “Just a Snowman” by Mercer Mayer would be a great selection. This book has detailed picture scenes and a variety of verbs to create sentences about what is happening on each page. 

Snowman Book Suggestions by Grade Level

If you are looking for snowman books for speech therapy, this blog post has lots of tips for which books to use for different speech and language goals!

When you plan using a themed-based approach, one way to make selecting a book easier is by choosing a book by grade level or target area.

Here are a few snowman book suggestions by grade level (Amazon affiliate links are included):

Prek-1st grade

Just a Snowman by Mercer Mayer

Snowmen at Night by Caralyn Buehner

2nd-3rd grade

Sneezy the Snowman by Maureen Wright

4th-5th

The Biggest Snowman by Steven Kroll

How to Catch a Snowman by Adam Wallace

Skills to Target with Snowman Books for Speech Therapy

It’s always helpful to know why an SLP chooses a book, so I am going to share some reasons why I would use certain books with different groups or ages. Having some examples of how to use a book can make planning therapy easier too! If you need some tips for using shared book reading strategies, check out this blog post HERE

Snowman Books With Reptitive Text

There Was a Cold Lady Who Swallowed Some Snow by Lucille Colandro or The First Day of Winter by Denise Fleming would be wonderful for targeting sequencing. Students that benefit from the repetitive text would do well with these book choices. And, they both provide opportunities for CORE words such as “give, eat, more, all done.”

If you need visual supports for the old lady book to work on CORE words, comprehension and story retell, grab this story map set of printable and animated Google Slides. 

Books that Target Vocabulary, Grammar and Comprehension

Snowman at Work and Snowmen at Night by Caralyn Buehner would be great for working on grammar, categories, answering wh-questions. The pictures are vivid, so you can target adjectives, prepositional phrases, and verbs when building sentences.

Using Books To Work on Narrative Skills and Inferencing

If you are looking for snowman books for speech therapy, this blog post has lots of tips for which books to use for different speech and language goals!

The Snowman by Raymond Briggs is a wordless book that allows you to target inferencing, storytelling, and comprehension. You can also incorporate writing by having students share what they would do with a snowman for a day. There are many opportunities to ask and discuss inferential questions in the book.

Furthermore, The Biggest Snowman by Steven Kroll and Sneezy the Snowman by Maureen Wright are great books for working on story elements and comprehension. 

What Snowman-Themed Books Do You Use With Your Students?

What snowman books do you enjoy grabbing off the shelf to use in therapy? I would love to know what your students enjoy as well as some goals you target with the books! You can never have enough books of therapy ideas! Share your favorite snowman book in the comments and what skills you target. If you need some snowman toys or props to use with your books, check out this blog post with ideas for toys!

Shared Book Reading Strategies to Build Language

Shared Book Reading Strategies to Build Language

When it comes to planning language therapy, school-based SLPs do not have a lot of time to prep and make materials.

Using shared book reading strategies in speech therapy can be an effective way to plan lessons quickly and implement language intervention techniques that work.

Plus, you can also implement a parent or staff coaching model by showing support staff how to implement shared book reading strategies during classroom instruction. This can help with further generalization of language skills. If you need more information about different collaborative services, check out this BLOG POST.

What Are Shared Book Reading Strategies?

Shared book reading strategies are a set of techniques that adults can use while reading a story to increase a child’s engagement with the story. The goal of using structured interactive book reading techniques is to help enhance the child’s language and literacy skills.

Instead of just reading the book aloud to the child, the adult is uses shared book reading strategies to help the child learn new vocabulary, answer questions about the story, and draw connections with the characters and events.

Using interactive book reading strategies helps struggling readers have support to participate in enjoying the story and it allows children to access books that they may not be able to read on their own.

As speech pathologists, we see students with language impairments on our caseloads. The research shows that when our students oral language improves, their reading comprehension will improve as well!

In fact, there is research that found when language interventions focus on a broad set of oral language skills such as vocabulary, grammar, syntax, narrative skills, and inferencing are linked to showing effective outcomes for student’s reading comprehension.

We can work on all those broad oral language skills using books.

 

shared book reading strategies in speech therapy to build language skills and increase engagement.

Benefits of Shared Book Reading Strategies in Speech Therapy

shared book reading strategies speech therapy ideas to increase language skills

First off, I will just say that if you do not have a ton of time to plan therapy, using books to guide instruction is the way to go! It will save you time planning therapy without losing the effectiveness of the intervention.

Secondly, when you use shared book reading strategies you organically increase student engagement. They are more actively participating during the story, they begin to predict the events in the story, learn that the pictures can provide clues about the story and characters, and it reduces the cognitive demands for processing language.

Using books can be an easy way to incorporate opportunities to work on lots of different skills such as categories, tier II vocabulary, wh-questions, grammar concepts, perspective-taking, and story retell.

And, our students have to use literature in the classroom every day, so if we can enhance their language and ability to follow the events of a story, they will generalize those skills into the classroom setting better.

There is research that shows that when using shared book reading strategies, students learn 1.22 more words on average than when interactive book strategies aren’t used.

shared book reading strategies speech therapy ideas to increase language skills

Types of Shared Book Reading Strategies to Use in Speech Therapy

Before reading the book, you can discuss the title. Have students make predictions about why you chose the book or what they think the story will be about based on the title and picture of the book.

You can also discuss key vocabulary before reading the book to help expose them to concepts or vocabulary they may not have heard before to help with comprehension.

Another easy strategy is to point to the vocabulary in the pictures of the story and provide clear, child-friendly definitions.

Then, during extension activities, you can have the child act out those words and make connections with those target vocabulary words.

Another strategy to build vocabulary is to label pictures in the book, describing the characters while pointing to the pictures or text, and asking questions related to the story.

After reading the book, you can discuss the book with your students. This is when you can ask them to make personal connections with a story. For example, with the book, Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good Very Bad Day, you can ask your students to reflect on a day that wasn’t great. This can be an opportunity to compare/contrast their horrible day to Alexander’s.

This increases the opportunity for students to hear and use the targeted vocabulary from the story.

 

Often times in therapy we may use a book 1-2 times, but with shared book reading, they encourage repeatedly reading stories because it allows students to ask more questions and can talk more about the content as they become more familiar with the story elements.

One way you can increase opportunities for story retell, practicing vocabulary or using verbs from the story is to plan extension activities using toys, sensory bins, visual story maps, etc. I love using my Penguin senosry bin with the book, Tacky the Penguin.

Materials to Help You Implement Shared Book Reading

For all of my whole class and small group therapy sessions, I always use a book to plan my therapy.

I use the shared book reading strategies while I read the book to the group. Then, we discuss the book or review the vocabulary as a group. To keep students engaged, we will break up into group stations in which I have extension activities that align with the book. This allows we to review the vocabulary and verbs from the story.

In all of my push-in unit, I include a Google Slide, a parent newsletter with book suggestions and activities that cover the theme. 

There are also 3-5 activities included for small group. This allows me to use a theme such as the farm, and pick different farm books to use with the students. I can interchange the books in the theme and always have extension activities that align with the vocabulary.

If you need activities to implement shared book reading, I have LOTS of themes. Here is bundle 1 and bundle 2. Check out some of the units and how I use books to facilitate the extension lessons.

Free Story Element Visual Supports

While you read the book, you can work on identifying the story elements with these free story elements visuals. You can put them on popsicle sticks and give each student in the group a couple of story elements to listen for in the book. If you need more ideas with popsicles, head to this BLOG POST. Just click the pink button below to grab your free visuals.

Book Recommendations to Use in Speech Therapy

If you need help with finding books to use in your speech therapy sessions, check out these blog posts:

Diverse Children Books

Summer Books for Speech Therapy

January Read Aloud Books

Top Ten Books for Speech Therapy

Wordless Picture Books for Speech Therapy

Books You Need in Your Speech Library

Beyond the Book- Maya’s Book Nook provides questions, vocabulary to target, and a post-activity to do!

Diverse Books for Speech Therapy by Sweet Southern Speech

Shared Book Reading speech therapy strategies to help increase engagement and build language skills.
Books To Teach Summer Vocabulary In Speech Therapy

Books To Teach Summer Vocabulary In Speech Therapy

I love incorporating books into speech therapy. It is the easiest way for me to teach themed vocabulary without having to prep anything! Summer books are filled with picture scenes that have summer vocabulary to teach. I don’t think I could ever have enough books to teach summer vocabulary! #professionalbookhoarder

This blog post will walk you through the benefits of teaching vocabulary using summer-themed books and strategies for building better vocabulary with your students!

Why Using Summer-Themed Vocabulary Is Beneficial for Language Therapy

When working with students to improve their vocabulary, the research shows that focusing on building a deep vocabulary will help students learn new words because they can add those new words into a system or category a child knows well. There is also research that shows that students with language impairments need up to 36 engagements with a word before they learn it. So, as clinicians, implementing themed therapy can be a great approach to building a depth of knowledge for vocabulary. This gives us permission to use a summer theme for longer than a week because the more engagements with words, the better our students will learn a deep knowledge of that vocabulary.

Furthermore, if your teachers are also incorporating summer-themed books into their curriculum and daily class readings, we are helping to give more exposure and discussion with those words when our students come to the speech room. Plus, most students have experienced a summer season. By picking a theme that is relatable, it will help your students draw from their own experiences with the summer concepts and vocabulary. 

You can see some of the research articles at the end of this blog post that specifically look at vocabulary intervention. 

Books also provide way more opportunities for you to target other language skills, such as inference, predicting, grammar, articulation practice and carryover, story retell, and narrative comprehension. 

The cool thing about using a summer theme to plan therapy is that you can incorporate a new summer-themed book every 1-2 weeks. You will keep students engaged by reading a new story while still choosing a book that builds off of previously taught vocabulary. 

Strategies on How to Teach Vocabulary with Literature

To help your students build stronger vocabularies, here are some strategies you can use to teach vocabulary with literature:

Provide multiple exposures to words while reading the book and in activities. One study found that just hearing the target words helped build vocabulary.

Give explicit information about the words in the book or give kid-friendly definitions of unknown words. Picking out Tier II vocabulary words has been shown as the best way to build vocabulary. Bringing Words to Life is a great resource to learn more about Tier II vocabulary. You can use the story pictures to also show the vocabulary words.

Focus on teaching words and how they relate thematically, such as a word map, naming word associations, or talking about a word in a taxonomy. For example, when teaching a word thematically, such as with the word “beach,” you can word map clothes you bring, activities you enjoy at the beach, food you eat, things you see, how beach items feel/look, etc.

More Tips for Teaching Vocabulary

When building depth of knowledge using a taxonomy approach, you are deconstructing a word by category, sub-category, function, location, size, shape, texture, parts, etc. For example, with the word “popsicle,” you could explain that it is a food and/or that it is a type of cold dessert. A popsicle can be eaten, it melts, and it often comes on a stick. A popsicle is made up of ingredients that are blended together and frozen. You keep popsicles in a freezer until you want to eat one.

As you are reading the book, you can use dialogic reading techniques to facilitate language discussion around the words. After reading the book, you can set up play activities that are related to the book’s concepts and/or theme to encourage students to act out the concepts from the book. Sensory bins, pretend play, toys, or props for story retell can work great to engage your students. 

Summer Sub-Themes to Incorporate in Speech Therapy

When we think of summer, there are probably a variety of words and experiences you associate with that word. And, that might be different for you based on where you live in the world and what your students’ cultural values are surrounding summer.

Since I live in California, going to rivers, lakes, beaches, and/or swimming pools are activities many kids in my community enjoy on hot days. So, finding books with these topics are very relevant to my caseload. Other summer themes that resonate with students can be camping, Fourth of July, summer weather, going on vacation, ice cream, popsicles, lemonade stands, BBQs, nature hikes, bugs, ocean animals, waterslides, or just everyday summer activities, such as water balloons and bike rides. What other summer themes do you love to target?

If you need resources that help you plan extension activities with a summer theme, check these out from my blog and Teachers Pay Teachers store:

Camping Speech Therapy Activities

Summer Vocabulary and Grammar Activities for K-2

Camping Language Lesson Plan Guides for Small Group or Push-In Therapy for K-2

Ice Cream Language Lesson Plan Guides for Small Group or Push-In Therapy K-2

Beach Language Lesson Plan Guides for Small Group or Push-In Therapy K-2

Summer Language Lesson Plan Guides for Small Group or Push-In Therapy K-2

Ocean Language Lesson Plan Guides for Small Group or Push-In Therapy K-2

Books to Teach Summer Vocabulary for Camping

I have been so thankful to find resources on social media that share book recommendations and specifically diverse book recommendations. If you need some accounts to follow for books, I highly recommend following @havingoursay @diversereads 

They have top-notch recommendations and I got Jabari Reads from @diversereads

The Camping Trip by Jennifer K. Mann 

Ernestine is invited to go on her very first camping trip. Although she is excited and packed thoroughly for camping, Ernestine has to learn how to set up a tent and what it is like to be out in the wilderness. This is a great story about a little girl who has to navigate a new environment that brings challenges. Even though camping is, at times, uncomfortable for Ernestine, she learns how to make lasting memor

A Camping Spree with Mr. Magee by Chronicle Books

Camping is a favorite pastime for a lot of people during the summer months! A Camping Spree with Mr. Magee is a great book to teach about all those camping vocabulary words. It has  fun, vivid pictures; a bear; a camper; Mr. Magee; and his cute dog, Dee.

If you need camping resources to pair with this book, I have some fun camping activities, including a S’mores craftivity, in my Summer Craftivity Set! You can also make a fun lantern craft. Check out my tutorial for how to make a lantern by clicking the YouTube video (I know it is for Chinese New Year, but I use that craft for camping lanterns, too).

Books to Teach Summer Vocabulary at the Beach

When a Dragon Moves In by Jodi Moore

I love using When a Dragon Moves In to teach beach-themed vocabulary, to work on inferencing, and to work on perspective-taking. This book is all about a boy who is pretending that his sandcastle has a dragon inside it. He talks all about the things he does at the beach with the dragon. The boy’s family doesn’t seem to believe him when he tells them that it is the dragon who is eating the brownies and spraying sand at his sister. The pictures are very colorful, and it is a great book to discuss pretend versus real.

The Sandcastle Contest by Robert Munsch

If you want a book with a summer theme that is good for working on oral narration and story comprehension, The Sandcastle Contest  is a great book to work on those skills! This book is all about cool sandcastles, so it is a pretty engaging book for students. I have a buried in sand craftivity that would go great with this book!

Beach Day by Clarion Books

Beach Day is probably my most favorite beach-themed book! It is written with a rhyme sentence structure, so it isn’t that long of a book. Why I LOVE the book is because the pictures are filled with lots of people and activities that a person may do at the beach. It is great for teaching beach vocabulary, as well as for creating sentences about what the people are doing. I love that this could help with teaching word associations, and the visual supports are already built in with the book, so you don’t have to worry about preparing visuals for your lesson.

Summer Books to Build Vocabulary on Hot Days

Jabari Jumps by Gaia Cornwall

Jabari Jumps is a sweet tale about a young boy who is ready to jump off the diving board. Jabari has passed his swimming test and now has to figure out how he can overcome his fear of jumping off the diving board. Kids can relate to this book as many take swim lessons over the summer and also have fears of jumping off the diving board. You can also work on /dj/ when reading this story. 

Let It Shine by Maryann Cocca-Leffler

If you like to talk about a lot of different activities people do over the summer, then Let It Shine is the perfect book to read with your students. This book is great for answering themed wh- questions. They cover Fourth of July, baseball games, the beach, swimming, camping, and more in this book!

One Hot Summer Day by Nina Crews

This is a great book for Pre-K and kindergarten that talks about what happens during a big heat wave in the summer months. The book uses real photos, so children can relate to the words used about summer. For many children, hot summer days are just ordinary days filled with fans, popsicles, and trying to stay cool in the shade. 

The Night Before Summer Vacation by Natasha Wing

Lots of children go on vacation during the summer months. The Night Before Summer Vacation is a book that talks all about what happens the night before kids go on summer vacation.

Speech Therapy Resources with a Summer Theme

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