Monster Speech Therapy Materials That Are Fun!

Monster Speech Therapy Materials That Are Fun!

If you are new to planning therapy around themes, then you will love all the ideas in this blog post. Today, I am sharing about monster speech therapy materials that are fun for your students. I think you will like using them, too!

 

To plan therapy around a theme, you simply pick a topic or a book that you want to use in therapy. Then, you find books and activities that will support your theme. By using a theme, you can heavily target specific vocabulary used with that theme. Amazon affiliate links are included for your convenience.

Using monsters as your next theme is perfect for increasing engagement with your students, because most kids seem to love talking about those silly creatures.

Monster Books You Can Use in Speech Therapy

There are a ton of great monster-themed books. You can work on story retell, vocabulary, answering wh- questions, describing, grammar, and social skills using books. I listed some of my faves below and what target areas you can focus on. 

The Color Monster by Anna Llenas is great for teaching emotions.

How to Catch a Monster by Adam Wallace can target vocabulary and story retell.

Go Away, Big Green Monster by Ed Emberley is great for students working on simple vocabulary and language.

The Monster Who Lost His Mean by Tiffany Strelitz Haber can be used for social skills and also has opportunities to work on phonological awareness skills. 

Monsters Love School by Mike Austin has a ton of unique verbs to target while reading the story.

Little Shop of Monsters by R.L.Stine has so many great adjectives and describing words to introduce to your students.

 

What are your favorite monster-themed books to use in your therapy sessions? Share in the comments. Please let me know what skills you target, too!

Build-A-Monster Speech Therapy App

 

Making your very own silly monster is very motivating for children! Your students will love creating their own monster using the Sago Mini Monsters App. This app is under $5, so it is affordable for you SLPs on a budget.

 

With this Mini Monsters app, you can target the following skills:

-Initiating requests and comments

-Working on describing skills

-Targeting verbs

– Practicing sequencing steps to make the monster

 Watch a YouTube tutorial to see the monster app in action. How would you use this app in therapy? Let me know in the comments!

 

Target Following Directions and Prepositions with Silly Monsters

Have your students make their own monster puppets with the FREE monster puppet printables in my TPT store. Use popsicle sticks (Amazon affiliate links included) and tape to create fun monster therapy materials.

You can work on following directions and using prepositions with your monster puppets. 

With your monster puppets, you can also work on has/have and “who” questions. Place the monsters on the table and put mini objects next to the monsters. Students can explain what each monster has with a grammatically correct sentences.

Ask your students “Who has ____?” or give clues about an item and have your students identify “who” has the item. 

 

Reinforcer Games For Mixed Groups

When I have a group working on different goals, one way I keep the students engaged is by having a generic game to play in between turns.

If you want to use a monster theme in your mixed group, then you can use this roll and color monster game that is a FREE printable in my store. You just print the sheets and grab a die and the stimulus items your students need to work on in speech therapy. Whatever number the student rolls on the die is how many monsters they get to color. Whoever colors all of their monsters first wins!

Learning Resources has a Twist and Match Monsters game that is great to use as a reinforcer for any goal. You can have some fun describing the monsters as you play, too.

Make Monster Paper Bag Puppets

I saw this paper bag monster puppet idea on I Heart Crafty Things. I thought it would be perfect for my younger students. During the craft you can work on requesting, commenting and the basic concept “on.” Then, your students can use the puppets to work on pretend play, following directions, doing verb actions and more!

You just need paper bags (I found color bags on Amazon), construction paper, scissors, and glue. If you want to use googly eyes, Dollar Tree has packages or you can use these eye stickers that I found on Amazon.

Teach Word Opposites and Adjectives

Work on teaching adjectives with the feed the monster activity. Students can work on describing the items by adjectives, as well as work on verb tenses.

To get some movement going in your therapy room, tape the word opposite monsters around your room. Then, students use the checklist to find the word opposites that the monsters are chomping on. These activities will help your wiggly students stay focused. See the picture below for an example of this word opposite activity! It is all part of my Monster Push-In Language Lesson Plan Guides for K-2 students.

Have your students work on initiating communication, describing, and practicing sequencing with this design a monster file folder activity. Kids will feel motivated to participate knowing that they get some say in what the monster will look like. Need these materials for your K-2 caseload? Grab them in my TPT store. There are a lot more tools included, such as a Google Slides presentation, a newsletter home to parents, book recommendations, YouTube video links, and more!

Need More Monster Speech Therapy Ideas?

In this blog post, I shared some other monster speech therapy ideas you can use with your students. My students especially loved making their own monsters with play dough!

What Monster Speech Therapy Materials Do You Use?

Do you have a fave monster speech therapy material you love to use with your students? I would love to know about it! You know I am all about adding new materials to my speech therapy stash. Let me know your favorite material in the comments. 

Using Popsicle Sticks in Speech Therapy

Using Popsicle Sticks in Speech Therapy

Some of my best therapy materials come from affordable things I can find at a dollar store. Have you used popsicle sticks in your speech therapy sessions? They can be a great material that can cover a lot of goals.

And, let’s face it: So many of us don’t even get a budget for speech therapy materials. Plus, we’ve all got bills, so buying a ton of extra fancy materials for therapy isn’t always an option. Today, I want to share all the ways you can use popsicle sticks in your next speech therapy session.

Popsicle Stick Games for Mixed Groups

Zap It is a great game for mixed groups! You can target any goal, and the kids love the game. This game also gets my artic students to practice more trials. Whatever number is written on their popsicle stick, they have to say their word that many times! Check out the game HERE (it has a rule cheat sheet guide).

Play pick up sticks using a set of popsicle sticks. Just write your students’ targets on both sides of the sticks. I try to make sure to pick articulation targets that can also be used for vocabulary instruction. For example, if a child is working on /l/, I would pick lemonade, lion, and lock because we can work on category groups, noun functions, locations, and parts. Or, other students can create grammatically correct sentences using the words.

Popsicle Stick Pacing Boards for Speech Therapy

You can create pacing boards using popsicle sticks. I like using the jumbo-sized popsicle sticks (Amazon affiliate link) for making these. Students can create dots, stars, or other designs with markers. You can also allow students to pick out their favorite stickers to put on the popsicle stick.

Then, you can use them for lots of different goals! Check out my ideas:

-Use as a pacing board for fluency-enhancing techniques

-Identifying how many sounds are in a word

-Creating longer sentences

-Pacing how many times a student has said a sound or a word

Popsicle Stick Puppets for Speech Therapy

One of the easiest crafts to make with your students is making popsicle stick puppets. You can print a sheet of characters, have the students color them, and then attach them to a popsicle stick. The students can work on story retell, pronouns, basic concepts, or following directions with their puppets.

Using Popsicle Sticks with Literacy

When planning mixed group therapy, I tend to use books to plan lessons. I can plan more efficiently while still targeting everyone’s goals. While reading the story, you can give students “jobs” when listening to the story. I cut 3” by 5” index cards in half, write what the students are working on, and tape them to  popsicle sticks.

I tell the students to hold up their sticks whenever they hear their sound or hear a word they don’t understand. Students can remember what they are working on by looking at their “job” on the stick. So, when I call on a student to make a sentence about the story picture, they know what I want them to do.

 

You can also put story grammar element visual cues on popsicle sticks. Hand a few of the story element sticks to each student in the group. While you are reading the book, you can stop and go through the elements of the story. To keep everyone engaged, they have specific elements to recall.

Grab these free story visual cues by clicking the pink button below.

Make Visual Cues with Popsicle Sticks

You can make visual cues for any skill with popsicle sticks! This is an easy way to visually remind your students about what they are working on in speech therapy. Some of my students have moved beyond drill and are working on self-monitoring. I love using visual cues for articulation carryover and for social pragmatics. During conversational tasks, you can visually remind your students about their social behavior. This can help them to remember the social rules or to look around for the non-verbal body language.

 

Grab these free speech sound cues HERE

How Do You Use Popsicle Sticks in Therapy Sessions?

Aren’t these functional ideas great for therapy sessions? My favorite place to stock up on popsicle sticks is at the Dollar Tree. Therapy doesn’t have to always be with fancy toys and programs to be effective. How do you use popsicle sticks in your therapy room? Share in the comments.

Spooky, Crawly Spider Activities For Speech

Spooky, Crawly Spider Activities For Speech

In real life, I am not a fan of spiders, or any creepy insects for that matter. If I see a spider crawl out of a cupboard or found in a dark corner in a bag in the garage, I literally freak out like someone is attacking me!

Can you relate? In our old house, our garage was known to have black widows, so if I saw one of those gnarly things, I went into a panic: hurry, kill it quick! Daddy long legs and small spiders don’t seem to bring on the panic, but when I hear people say that humans actually eat 8 spiders a year in their sleep, it kinda wants to make me gag. Who knows if that statistic is even true, but I don’t really want to think about it at the moment.

Spider activities in speech for elementary SLPs

Anyways, the whole reason I bring up “spiders” is to tell you that it is a great theme to use in your speech therapy room. There are lots of great books, crafts, YouTube videos and activities you can use to work on speech and language skills. As long as they are fake, spiders are allowed in my therapy room. How about you? Today I am going to be sharing about spider activities for speech that can be your October theme–this is especially helpful if your school is not able to plan Halloween activities. If you need some Halloween ideas for therapy, check out some of my previous blog posts for therapy ideas:

Halloween Speech Therapy Ideas

Rollin’ With My Pumpkins

Halloween Crafts For Speech Therapy

Spider Book Recommendations for Speech

There are some really great books with spiders as the main character that you can use in speech. Here are some of my favorites to use in therapy:

Aaarrggh Spider by Lydia Monk (affiliate link) is a great story about a spider that wants to be this family’s pet. It is great for answering comprehension questions and story retell. It also works on perspective taking and how the spider feels verses the family. The spider doesn’t understand why the family freaks out every time they see him.

spider activities for speech using engaging spider story books for kids!

The Very Busy Spider by Eric Carle (affiliate link) is a great book to work on sequencing and teach verbs such as “spin,” “ride,” “eat,” and “run.” This book is also great for teaching the animal category. You can use the pictures in the book to work on describing the animals by attributes and what they are doing or where they are located.

Spider Activities For Speech

Students can use spider webs while working on their speech and language targets.

Use no prep spider activities for speech to reinforce students in mixed groups.

You can do spider races to work on go/stop (CORE vocab), target the verb “blow”, and teach the basic concept “across”. Read this blog post for more pics and details.spider activities for speech

For your students working on functional communication and language skills, use a Visual Recipe from Live Love Speech to make this adorable spider snack. I loved having the visuals to target wh-questions, and vocabulary. Then, while the kids eat their snack, we tried to get some natural conversation going.

Using Spider Crafts In Speech

spider activities in speech using a fun craft that can be adapted across goals. Use this spider craft to target a lot of goals.

Make a crawly spider in speech. Students can practice following directions while making this spider craft. You just cut out black circles for the head, get the spider face printable on this blog post (free printable), and then cut black strips of construction paper (affiliate link). The students fold the construction paper back and forth to make the legs. You can work on simple sequencing of how to make the craft, practice the basic concepts “on”, “before”, and “after” while doing the craft. After creating the craft, you can work on asking which pictures are near the spider’s head and far from the spider’s head.

Students can glue speech or language targets on the spider’s leg. Keep the spider crafts as decor or use them as the warm up for the next session. Send them home for additional practice. I used my Any Craft Companion Pack to have targets for the craft. If you are short on prep time, have students write their targets using white crayon or colored pencil.

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I love this synonym spider craft from Nicole Allison! It is functional and great for decor/vocabulary review. You just need pipe cleaners, paper plates and the free printables from Nicole (affiliate links included).

YouTube Videos With Spiders To Use In Speech

If you have been following me on social media and my blog for a while, then you will know how much I LOVE Simon’s Cat videos on YouTube. The videos are like a movie comic strip that are non-verbal, so they are very versatile for speech and language therapy. Check out this blog post for more details about how I adapt these videos across grades and skills.

This past week I used these videos with my 4-6th grade students to work on a number of language skills: using the vocabulary word “predict,” perspective taking skills for the characters emotions, thought bubbles, sequencing the video with grammatically correct sentences, connecting words (first, next, last) as well as descriptive language.

Scishowkids makes a pretty good argument about why we shouldn’t be afraid of spiders. This is a great video to discuss main idea and details from a video. You can work on vocabulary tasks with the words “afraid,” “jump,” and “spin.”

 

 

Argh Matey, Let’s Learn How To Be A Pirate In Speech

Argh Matey, Let’s Learn How To Be A Pirate In Speech

Will you be walking the plank this week in your speech sessions? SLPs out there that love themed therapy, let me just tell that pirates are a BIG hit with the kids. Our younger students love the idea of pirates and all the silly lingo that pirates say. If you need ideas for Pirate speech therapy activities, this blog post has all the inspiration to help you plan engaging speech and language lessons!

Ahoy there mateys! Pirate speech therapy activities to help SLPs plan fun & engaging lessons! Craft ideas, treasure hunt sensory bin, language lessons & book recommendations. #Talklikeapirate #slpeeps #slpsensorybin #sensorybins #craftsforkids #speechtherapy #speechpathology

Pirate Speech Therapy Activities Using Crafts

When I do push-in speech therapy lessons in my Special Day Classroom for K-2, I try to incorporate as many hands on learning activities as possible. The kids find the lessons more fun, they can take the craft home to spark conversations with parents, and it allows an opportunity for naturalistic conversations or pretend play!

Ahoy there mateys! Pirate speech therapy activities to help SLPs plan fun & engaging lessons! Craft ideas, treasure hunt sensory bin, language lessons & book recommendations. #Talklikeapirate #slpeeps #slpsensorybin #sensorybins #craftsforkids #speechtherapy #speechpathology

Crafts can be a lot to prep, so to make things easier, find easy to prep crafts such as this pirate paper bag craft. I typically do a 20-30 minute carpet circle time lesson including a pirate book, anchor chart or movement activity. Then, the students break up into three stations. I run a station, and the teachers/instructional aids run stations. We do those for about 10 minutes each and then rotate the students to the next station. Because I didn’t run the paper bag craft station, I didn’t get to see the kids puppets. At the end of the stations, over half the class initiated conversation with me because they wanted ME to see their pirate puppet. It was amazing to hearing all the spontaneous conversation. Some students even requested to take them out at recess to play with them.

Who Stole The Treasure Activity?

I found some plastic gold coins at the Dollar Spot during the St. Patrick’s holiday. After I read a pirate book, we play the “Who Stole The Treasure?” activity. It works on object permanence, being able to have impulse control to NOT reveal if they stole the treasure, ask/answer questions with peers, and using the body language necessary for talking with peers. You can also give students the treasure and work on answering simple wh-questions. Who has the treasure? Who has the gold coins? If you have more pirate props, you can give every student an item and work on “who” questions.

Ahoy there mateys! Pirate speech therapy activities to help SLPs plan fun & engaging lessons! Craft ideas, treasure hunt sensory bin, language lessons & book recommendations. #Talklikeapirate #slpeeps #slpsensorybin #sensorybins #craftsforkids #speechtherapy #speechpathology

Have all the students close their eyes. Explain that if the student gets a treasure chest or gold coin, that they have to keep it a secret. When all the items are hidden, pick a student or students to ask his/her peers if they have the item? Continue this activity until all the treasure is found. The printables and lesson plan are part of my Pirate Push-In Language Lesson Plan Guide.

Make Your Own Treasure Sensory Bin In Speech Therapy

To make a Treasure Sensory bin, you need a filler, fake gold coins and items to hide in the bin. I liked using kinetic sand that I got at Lakeshore Learning, but there are some good deals on amazon for kinetic sand (affiliate)

Ahoy there mateys! Pirate speech therapy activities to help SLPs plan fun & engaging lessons! Craft ideas, treasure hunt sensory bin, language lessons & book recommendations. #Talklikeapirate #slpeeps #slpsensorybin #sensorybins #craftsforkids #speechtherapy #speechpathology

I got my container from Lakeshore, but you can use any bin. I actually prefer bins that have clasps (amazon affiliate) on the lid in case you drop the bin in transit. I hid dinkydoodad trinkets that I found on etsy in the bin. Then, students got to go hunt for treasure.

Ahoy there mateys! Pirate speech therapy activities to help SLPs plan fun & engaging lessons! Craft ideas, treasure hunt sensory bin, language lessons & book recommendations. #Talklikeapirate #slpeeps #slpsensorybin #sensorybins #craftsforkids #speechtherapy #speechpathology

Ways To Use The Treasure Hunt Sensory Bin

Once, students went hunting for treasure, we discussed the items they found by category group, noun function, parts, etc. You can go on a categories treasure hunt using my FREE printable that you can access on this blog post.

Another way that I used this bin was to work on the verbs “bury” and “hide”. After the kids went on the treasure hunt, they got to bury the treasure so that other pirates couldn’t find their loot. Your students can work on building grammatically correct sentences and answering “who” questions. “I buried _______.” And then I asked peers, “who buried the shoe?”

Pirate Books For Speech Therapy

Ahoy there mateys! Pirate speech therapy activities to help SLPs plan fun & engaging lessons! Craft ideas, treasure hunt sensory bin, language lessons & book recommendations. #Talklikeapirate #slpeeps #slpsensorybin #sensorybins #craftsforkids #speechtherapy #speechpathology

A quick search on pinterest will help you select a pirate themed book for therapy. YouTube also has pirate read aloud books in the event that you don’t have pirate books in your own therapy materials library. Here are a few of my favorite books that I like to use:

There Was An Old Pirate Who Swallowed a Fish by Jennifer Ward is a great book for kids that need repetitive language. The kids love seeing the pirates belly grow and can’t believe he is swallowing all these items! The visuals for The Old Pirate Who Swallowed A Fish are part of my pirate push-in language lesson plan guide for k-2.

Pirates Don’t Change Diapers by Melinda Long is a fun tale about a kid who had pirates come visit him at his home.

The Pirate Who Couldn’t Say Arrr by Angie Neal M.S. CCC-SLP is a great book written by a speech pathologist! It is a great book for teaching /r/ and uses a lot of pirate vocabulary.

YouTube Videos To Use With A Pirate Theme

This pirate YouTube video is good for following directions and a great reinforcer or movement break.

Pirate Party Preschool Song is great for getting some movement, learning pirate vocabulary & doing verb actions.

The Go Noodle crew has a Pirate Prep video that is fun for a movement break and to keep the kids engaged in the lesson.

This video can be used to work on the /ar/ sound in therapy!

What Pirate Speech Therapy Activities Do You Plan?

What pirate speech therapy activities do you plan? Did you know that September 19th is Talk Like A Pirate Day? This is the best time to plan pirate activities. But, honestly, you can do pirates any old time you want to in speech. I think this theme is highly motivating for our younger students. I would love to know what middle school and high school SLPs do for pirates week! Share in the comments your ideas for older students.

 

How To Adapt Lids ‘N Lizards In Speech Therapy

How To Adapt Lids ‘N Lizards In Speech Therapy

SLPs are always on the hunt for games to adapt and use in speech therapy sessions. When teaching language concepts, kids get more engaged when vocabulary and grammar is presented in a fun and engaging way. Today, I want to talk about how to use the game Lids ‘N Lizards in speech therapy. I have found a way to make this game festive and fun during certain seasons or holidays during the year! My SLP intern adapted this game back in March using leprechauns & gold coins. Instead of hiding lizards, she hid leprechauns under the lids.  The kids loved it! I decided to make other printable items that had the /l/ phoneme to adapt it throughout the year.

Lids 'N Lizards in speech therapy is a language game that can be adapted to use for a lot of different goals for speech therapy. Make speech therapy more engaging for your students while helping them meet their speech and language goals!

Where Can SLPs Get The Lids ‘N Lizards Game?

Lids ‘N Lizards is a game created by Super Duper Publications. You can get it on their website. I also checked Amazon (cause I know SLPs love Amazon) and you can get Lids ‘N Lizards there, too. Sometimes SLPs can find Lids ‘N Lizards at garage sales or Goodwill.

How To Play Lids ‘N Lizards Game

Lids 'N Lizards in speech therapy is a language based game for SLPs. Learn tips for how to adapt this game for speech therapy.

The Lids ‘N Lizard game comes with green metal tins and little lizards. You place magnetic vocabulary pictures on the roof of the metal tins. Then, lay the lids on the table and hide lizards under the metal tins. Students take turns picking up metal tins to see if they found a lizard. If they have a lizard under their tin, they get to keep the lizard. The student with the most lizards at the end of the game wins! Each turn, the student has to describe the picture item that is under the lid. One way to adapt this game for all year long is to put different items under the lids. I made some seasonal printables that you can download for FREE below. Each of the items in the download have /l/, so instead of Lids ‘N Lizards you can call the game Lids ‘N Leprechauns, Lids ‘N Lunchboxes, Lids ‘N Ladybugs and so on!

Lids 'N Lizards in speech therapy is a language based game for SLPs. Learn tips for how to adapt this game for speech therapy.

How To Adapt Lids ‘N Lizards For Mixed Groups

Articulation Goals – Lids ‘N Lizards is the perfect game for students working on /l/, /z/, or /r/ at the word or phrase level. For students working on other sounds, you can create carrier phrases with their sound such as “I found a/an _____” for /f/ or “I spy a/an _______” for s-blends.

Vocabulary Goals – The game is already designed to work on describing common nouns. You can always use lids and magnets to work on naming adjectives, describing by attributes, and answering wh-questions about the items.

Grammar Goals – When a student picks up the picture item, you can have them name the noun’s function or action word. They can use the verb in a sentence such as “The boy eats the ice cream.” Have the student work on past, present or future tense. With the noun picture item, you can also work on marking plurals or having students create a sentence with an adjective or prepositional phrase. The student can also work on marking pronouns by talking “who” has a certain picture item such as “She has the ice cream.” or “Give the truck to him.”

More Goals To Address With The Lids ‘N Lizards In Speech Therapy

Speech Fluency – With all the mentioned articulation and language therapy ideas mentioned above, you can do similar activities while having the student practice their speech fluency strategies.

Social Skills – While playing the game, you can work on students following the social rules of the game. Students can practice having their brain and body thinking about the people in the group. So, they can work on their non-verbal listening skills while the other person is sharing an item and then have to retell what the person said to show that they had their brain in the group. You can also grab a set of problem solving situations or social situations that the student would have to answer before taking a turn at the game.

 

Lids 'N Lizards in speech therapy can be used for different seasons of the year with these FREE printables. Easy to prep and store for the busy SLP!!

What Other Ways Can SLPs Use Lids ‘N Lizards In Speech Therapy?

One way that I have used the lids and magnetic pictures is to have students sort items by categories. I just use the lids to have the students sort the items onto the correct category group. This has been very effective for my younger students that need a hands-on experience. How do you adapt this game in speech therapy? Share in the comments! Need more games for your therapy room? Check out some of my favorite games HERE.

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