Books To Teach Summer Vocabulary In Speech Therapy

Books To Teach Summer Vocabulary In Speech Therapy

I love incorporating books into speech therapy. It is the easiest way for me to teach themed vocabulary without having to prep anything! Summer books are filled with picture scenes that have summer vocabulary to teach. I don’t think I could never have enough books to teach summer vocabulary! #professionalbookhoarder

Need books to teach vocabulary and summer themed vocabulary? Here is a list of top recommended summer books for kids to build vocabulary in speech therapy

Why Using Summer Themed Vocabulary Is Beneficial For Language Therapy

Choosing vocabulary words that align with the summer theme helps students remember them better! They can draw on their own experiences when recalling the vocabulary words and use examples from the books that you read them about summer! Summer is also a theme that all kids have experienced, so they can relate a lot better to the vocabulary and content surrounding that theme. You can also teach word relationships and word associations for these themes which is an evidence based strategy for building vocabulary! I love doing word webs to discuss word associations for the beach, camping, fourth of July, summer, and vacation! With word relationships, you can take a word such as “popsicle” and think of a descriptive word for the word such as “sweet”. Then, the students can think of an antonym for “sweet”. My Summer vocabulary and grammar activities for K-2 pair well with most summer books that allow students those extra exposures to summer vocabulary that they need. Did you know that kids with language impairments need up engage with new words up to 32 times to master it!? I figure if I am working on the same seasonal themes as the teachers, then that increases those vocabulary opportunities.

There are waaaayyy more language skills that you can target with books using summer themed vocabulary. I love teaching inferencing, predicting, grammar, articulation carryover, story retell and comprehension! Here are some books to teach summer vocabulary that I love incorporating in my speech therapy lessons (amazon affiliate links included).

10 Books To Teach Summer Vocabulary

1. Beach Day By Clarion Books

books to teach summer vocabulary

Beach Day is probably my most favorite beach themed book! It is written with a rhyme sentence structure, so it isn’t that long of a book. Why I LOVE the book is because the pictures are filled with lots of people and activities that a person may do at the beach. It is great for teaching beach vocabulary as well as creating sentences about what the people are doing. I love that this could help with teaching word associations and the visual supports are already built in with the book, so you don’t have to worry about prepping visuals for your lesson.

2. A Camping Spree With Mr. Magee By Chronicle Books

books to teach summer vocabulary

Camping is a favorite past time by a lot of people during the summer months! A Camping Spree With Mr. Magee is a great book teach about all those camping vocabulary words. It has a fun, vivid pictures, a bear, camper, Mr. Magee and his cute dog, Dee.

If you need camping resources to pair with this book, I have some fun camping activities including a S’mores craftivity in my Summer Craftivity Set! You can also make a fun lantern craft too. Check out my tutorial for how to make a lantern by clicking the youtube video (I know it is for Chinese New Year’s, but I use that craft for camping lanterns too).

3. All You Need For A Beach By Silver Whistle

4

All You Need For A Beach talks about all the things that is needed for the beach. It has a fun rhyme to the verses and doesn’t take too long to read. After reading a beach book, I have my students draw a picture of what they would do at the beach. Then, I have them add glue to the paper and we sprinkle sand to their beach scene. We work on the vocabulary and describing words for the different items in their pictures.

4. There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed A Shell by Lucille Colandro

books to teach summer vocabulary

The “old lady” books series are great for story retell. There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed A Shell is great because it uses similar sentences throughout the book, so it helps those kids that need to hear vocabulary many times. I think this book is also great for students working on /s/ and /sh/.

5. When A Dragon Moves In by Jodi Moore

2

I love using When A Dragon Moves In to teach beach themed vocabulary, work on inferencing and perspective taking. This book is all about a boy who is pretending that his sand castle has a dragon inside it. He talks all about the things he does at the beach with the dragon. The boy’s family doesn’t seem to believe him when he tells them that it is the dragon who is eating the brownies and spraying sand at his sister. The pictures are very colorful and it is a great book to discuss pretend vs. real.

6. The Sand Castle Contest by Robert Munsch

9

If you want a book with a summer theme that is good for working on oral narration and story comprehension, The Sand Castle Contest  is a great book to work on those skills! This book is all about cool sand castles, so it is a pretty engaging book for students. I have a buried in sand craftivity that would go great with this book!

7. Magic School Bus On The Ocean Floor by Joanna Cole & Bruce Degen

5

Magic School Bus On The Ocean Floor is a great book to use to teach about the ocean. This book is filled with lots of fun facts and interesting pictures. I love that I can read the whole book during a session, or break it up into smaller sections over the week and only read 3-4 pages. This book is great for your 3-4th graders that may still need picture supports to help with comprehension.

8. Let It Shine by Maryann Cocca-Leffler

1

If you like to talk about a lot of different activities people do over the summer, then Let It Shine is the perfect book to read with your students. This book is great for answering themed wh-questions. They cover 4th of July, baseball games, the beach, swimming, camping and more in this book!

9. The Night Before Summer Vacation by Natasha Wing

10

Lots of children go on vacation during the summer months. The Night Before Summer Vacation is a book that talks all about what happens the night before kids go on summer vacation.

If you need activities and resources that have a summer theme, I have a lot of great activities in my TPT store! My No Prep Summer Resource is a great time saver. What books do you use to teach summer themed vocabulary?

 

Mystery Word Game Your Kids Will Love

Mystery Word Game Your Kids Will Love

This week we played a REALLY fun word game that targeted LOTS of describing skills.  I even found a way to adapt it for some of my articulation students.  Word games for kids are the best way to get engagement with vocabulary building.  When you say “game”, the kids feel like they are having fun and not realizing how much thinking they are doing!  This word game also incorporates inferencing and critical thinking skills.

word games for kids that will get them excited about describing nouns

Word Games For Kids- Mystery Word

I used picture cards from my HedBanz Game (amazon affiliate link) to help my younger students think of a noun for the mystery word.  There are also these really cool Learning Resources Basic Vocabulary Photo Cards (amazon affiliate link included for your convenience) that would be awesome to use as well!  For my older students, we just brainstormed without pictures.

word games for kids that will get them excited about describing nouns

I made a detective game board to keep track of each player’s points.  You can assign one of the students to be the “points keeper”. These Reusable Dry Erase Pockets are amazing because I only have to print one game sheet to use over and over.

word games for kids that will get them excited about describing nouns

How to play the game

To play this word game, the clinician and/or one of the students in the groups is in charge of choosing a mystery word. Pick a word and write it down where the students cannot see it.

Then, give clue #1 to the group.  So if we picked “donut”. Clue #1 would be “dessert group”.  Each student can take a guess of the mystery word item.  Praise the students who make a “smart guess” for guessing a word that is in the correct category.  Quiz the students if a guess such as “pizza” would be a smart guess and why it would or would not be a smart guess. Give clue #2 such as “You eat it.  You can deep fry it.  You can put frosting on it.”  Allow for students to make a guess.  If a student’s smart guess is correct, then they would earn 4 points.  Continue giving clues until someone in the group guesses correctly.

word games for kids to work on describing nouns

The person with the most points at the end of the session wins!  Have the student describe the noun in complete sentences after the mystery word has been revealed! This is a great game to pair with the Expanding Expression Tool.

I adapted this game for my students working on /s/ by having them say the carrier phrase “I guess the item is……….” to work on final /s/.  With my /r/ students, I only picked words that contained /r/!

 

 

Click Here to download this game!

Hope you enjoy this game! How do you work on vocabulary? Any ways you would adapt this game? I would love to know your thoughts!

theDabblingSpeechy Logo Final6

Using the DUBSMASH app in speech therapy!

Using the DUBSMASH app in speech therapy!

Have you ever tried using the dubsmash app in speech therapy?  It’s FREE and super entertaining.  I wanted to share how I used the dubsmash app in speech therapy with my middle school students. I also prepared a little DUBSMASH video for your viewing pleasure, scroll down to the bottom of this post!

using the dubsmash app in speech therapy

If you haven’t heard of dubsmash, You can download the app HERE! Dubsmash is an app that allows people to lip sync and video themselves performing a TV show, movie or music clip.  It’s pretty entertaining and my family has enjoyed playing around with it.

Last year, when I worked with middle school students, I used it with my life skills students.  Big Disclaimer here: Make sure you have previewed and chosen which soundbites you want to use.  When I was experimenting at home with the app, I would sometimes click on a dub that looked “kid friendly” and was met with flavorful language to say the least.

I used the app mostly to engage my students who were working on functional social language and as reinforcement for participating in the group.  This is what I discovered with trying out this app!  I saw smiles emerge from my middle school students when I showed it to them.  Initiating and commenting increased without me “teacher” prompting them to talk. I built trust and a relationship with my students using this app.

Here are a few other ways I thought you could use this app in therapy:

  • You can work on identifying emotions based on the tone of voice of the soundbite.
  • Work on facial expressions when the students create their dub.
  • Students can use their AAC devices to request, make comments, and engage how they feel about the dubsmash.
  • Expressing why you liked a dubsmash clip with a conjunction such as “I really liked this dubsmash because…….”
  • Practice turn taking and waiting.  Also, working on sharing positive comments even if you don’t like the person’s dubsmash.
  • Give your students a social situation and then they have to chose which dubsmash would fit how the person could be feel or thinking during the social situation.

And last, but not least, use the dubsmash in speech therapy to send to your SLP colleagues and SPED team. You can send dubsmash videos via facebook messenger and text messages!  Dubsmash is all about bringing the joy to communication and I dig it!!

using the dubsmash app in speech therapy

So, if you have been following me for a while, you know that I like to have FUN!  I invited, I mean coerced, I mean black mailed all my speech therapy blogger buddies to help me make a Dubsmash compilation.  Check it out!!  We had so much fun.

How would you use the dubsmash app in speech therapy?

cropped-cropped-cropped-thedabblingspeechie_logo1.png

How to implement effective grammar intervention

How to implement effective grammar intervention

Every SLP needs resources on how to implement effective grammar intervention because half our caseloads have goals in this area!

Much of my career as a speech therapist has been working with students that have goals targeting grammar. I have seen that many children with deficits with grammar, often times, have language deficits in other areas such as vocabulary, oral comprehension and story narration.

how to implement Effective grammar strategies and resources

Today, I wanted to share about some articles I have found that talk about strategies for implementing effective grammar intervention.

Information about Implementing Effective Grammar Intervention

What I found when reading these different articles is there is not a “must use this technique always” when targeting grammar.  There is however, some really good guidelines that researchers have found to be helpful when you, the clinician are creating a treatment plan.

10 Principles of Grammar Intervention was a really good article to read that outlines what a clinician should consider when developing therapy plans for a student.

Fey, M.E., Long, S.H., Finestack, L.H. (2003). Ten principles of grammatical intervention for children with specific language impairments. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 12: 3-15

Some of the principles shared in the article are as follows:

  • The function of improving a child’s expressive grammar is so that they can have better language to effectively communicate whether orally or in written form. Thus, we should be targeting skills that will help improve their communication (a tip for writing/choosing goals) or help them to make progress with common core standards and academic activities.
  • A clinician may get more “bang for their buck” if they target grammar by broad grammar patterns verses “isolated” grammar targets.
  • “When grammar is targeted, it should be treated in ways that lead to improvements in other domains, such as storytelling, comprehension and expression of expository text, and reading comprehension.”

Grammar Intervention Research Article

A randomized clinical trial looked at two grammar treatment procedures of recasting and a cuing hierarchy in 31 five year olds to see which treatment would yield better results.

Here is what they found:

First off, the very fancy term “recasting” is simply the clinician implicitly responding to a child’s response with the correct grammar and sometimes emphasizing the correct word like, “I really love cookiessssss too.”  This technique helps keep the flow of conversation going without having to stop and correct the child. (you’re welcome for learning a big fancy speech therapy word…now go sprinkle that into your IEP meetings to impress some folk

In the study, when a child in the recast group made a grammar error, the SLP would do a “recast” and move on with the lesson, using recasting every time there was an error.

With the cueing group, when the child made an error, the SLP went through a hierarchy of scaffolding techniques to work on having the child correctly produce the grammar structure.

The overall study found that the cueing group made more growth then the recasting group.

So, children with speech and language impairments appear to be responding to implicit grammar intervention that provides cueing and allowing the child to say the sentence again to correct his/her error.

The Effectiveness of Two Grammar Treatment Procedures for Children With SLI: A Randomized Clinical Trial.  Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2015, Vol. 46, 312-324. doi:10.1044/2015_LSHSS-14-0041 Karen M. Smith-Lock, Suze Leitão, Polly Prior, and Lyndsey Nickels

Practical Strategies For Grammar Intervention

 Now, time for the practical tips for implementing these findings!  I typically will do 0ne-two structured therapy sessions filled with cueing and explicitly teaching the grammar components that I want to target. It will include visuals sentence strips, visuals of the rules, worksheets, lots of modeling, and having the student trying to correctly use the grammar rule.
Then, my next two sessions are filled with activities that the child may be asked to do in the classroom.  Basically, working on generalizing or applying the skill into a more complex task.  Often times, I will use books, story telling, answering wh-questions, describing nouns by attributes, play activities (i.e. play dough, cars, tea party, etc.) or describing picture scenes to work on grammar.  During this time, I am modeling, expanding, and “recasting” (it feels good word dropping fancy terms here). I feel like these sessions allow me to also let them hear correct grammar modeled to them, which seems important to the process.

Effective grammar resources that incorporate visual supports and hands on interaction for speech therapy

My Parts of Speech Sentence Flips are a great tool to use as a warm up to build mastery of LOTS of different grammar.  These sentence flips have a lot of opportunities for clinicians to cue the student with the correct grammar.

effective grammar intervention resources that incorporate visuals and make speech therapy fun!

My Parts of Speech Flashcard books are a great tool to use as a quick warm up as well or send home as homework.  Once assembled, students can create grammatically correct sentences with visual supports.

Use sentence frame graphic organizer with any language activity! FREE printable for teaching grammar concepts.

Sentence Frame Graphic Organizer (FREE) is a great tool to use with any book, youtube video or a picture.  It provides color coded columns to sort different parts of speech.  This is a great tool to start building more complex sentences and beginning to introduce written language.

effective grammar intervention resources that give visual supports to help with learning parts of speech

My Student Language Helpers are visual supports that you can make with two file folders glued or stapled together.  You can then glue all the different parts of speech to the helper.  The student can use this in the speech room or even in the classroom to help when writing sentences!

effective grammar intervention resources using themed vocabulary to practice grammar targets in speech therapy!

My seasonal themed vocabulary and grammar resource allows me to used seasonal vocabulary to practice grammar concepts as well as work on other skills such as wh-questions, compare/contrast and describing by attributes. These activities and visuals pair well with all of my seasonal books that I like to bring into the therapy room.

What resources for implementing effective grammar intervention do you use?  What techniques and research have you found for this intervention?  I would love to add more tools to my tool belt! Comment below or email me at feliceclark@thedabblingspeechie.com

Activities Using An Apple Theme For Your Middle School Caseload

Activities Using An Apple Theme For Your Middle School Caseload

When you look on pinterest and TPT, you will find TONS of materials for teaching with an apple theme.  It is a great teaching unit theme because apples are in season and are a strong part of what we associate with the autumn/fall season.  As I dabbled with all my online resources, I found that there wasn’t much out there that was appropriate for my middle school peeps.  My Independent Living Skills students are academically functioning between a 1st-3 rd grade level, so teaching about apples would be perfect for their language levels, but I needed to find materials that were not babyish while still covering functional vocabulary.

 

activities for middle school with an apple theme

My ILS SDC teachers are doing agriculture this month for their community skills elective class that they are teaching, so I thought apple farming would work well for planning lessons.  Here’s what this dabbling speechie came up with!

I push into the students Community based elective class, so we started the class with watching two short videos about apples.  The first video is about the nutrition and the second is about apple farming.  After watching the videos, I had the teacher and the 4 teacher aids be in charge of different tables.  This class has both of the Independent Living Skills classrooms, so their are 22-24 students in there at one time.  All the students are verbal, but do best when there is a small group.

I showed Apple farming video that has really good visuals for vocabulary such as tractor, barrels of apples, orchard, and barn.

I found this book on amazon and decided to buy it because it was such a good price (amazon affiliate link included for your convenience).

At one table station, I had a teacher aid read the book to the students and ask them questions about apples.

apples 3

The students really enjoyed the pictures and the book was short enough to keep their attention span.

apples 1We had a taste test of different apples.  This activity covered two objectives.  One was to learn about initiating conversation with peers and giving your opinion about something.  I made visuals for my students on the autism spectrum that needed a little nudge to share.  It worked!!  The other objective was to work on math concepts: more, less, and equal.

apples 4Apple Unit FREEBIE by Khrys Bosland  has an awesome graphing sheet to record which apple was each student’s favorite.  I think a few students added two favorites (I wasn’t manning that station).

apples 5With my 7th grade RSP language students, we tasted apples and oranges and then compared/contrasted them.  We also worked on describing the taste with adjectives.  I used the videos above to have them work on memory strategies to recall details from the videos and identifying the main idea from the videos.  I have been working on taking notes with just the KEY information with 2-3 words.  They had to share facts from the videos using that strategy.

apples 2

Autumn Apples Speech & Language Pack from Queen’s Speech was a great resource for working on describing apples and the vocabulary words for parts of the apple.  The pack includes mini book companions for some other great popular apple books.  I just ordered Apples by Gail Gibbons which is a great book to learn facts about apples.  There are question/answer cards about the book in this pack as well.

This pack from Rebecca Bettis Apples Everywhere: Cross Curricular Activities was really wonderful to use with my students.  It had a variety of activities that I could use across skills and some fun science experiment type activities.

My students that need to work on making complex sentences got to use these pre-write graphs to create a paragraph about apples.  They could talk about what you can do with apples, describe an apple, share the nutritious information about apples or apple farming.  We are on our first draft and they liked it.  It was nice to bring in a healthy snack and watch my students be excited about eating the fruit.  This theme was adapted across many of my groups, so I hope you try some of these ideas during the apple harvest season!

Copyright 2019 The Dabbling Speechie | Disclosures | Terms of UseBrand Ambassador Program