That Darn R! 10 TPT Speech Therapy Materials to Treat R

That Darn R! 10 TPT Speech Therapy Materials to Treat R

Treating the /r/ phoneme can be tricky, tiresome and just plain annoying for both the clinician and student! I haven’t met an SLP in the elementary, middle school or high school level that doesn’t need more speech therapy materials for r.

speech therapy activities for treating r. Once you get an /r/ established, there are some great activities on TPT.

The best advice I got from a veteran SLP when I asked how to teach a child to say /r/ was “just grab a pair of gloves, a tongue depressor and hope for the best!”

Dwight Schrute sums up most SLP’s feelings about the /r/ phoneme in his office video clip!  He says “R is one of the most menacing of sounds!  That’s why they call it murder and not muck duck!”  My thoughts exactly Dwight. Here is a post by SLP Natalie Snyders about getting a good /r/. There is also some really good ideas from Playing With Words 365 about teaching the /r/ phoneme.

Articulation Activities To Treat The /R/ Phoneme

Here are some TPT products that I have made or bought from TPT that have helped keep my kids motivated and get good results with mastering the /r/!!r initial flip book blog post1.  My interactive initial r and r-blend flipbooks are perfect for your older students that can read and write well! My prevocalic and vocalic r flip books have been great as well!

speech therapy materials for r

2. Figuratively speeching has a great articulation placemat set that is great for sending home for additional practice. It provides activities for the whole week on one sheet with letters included to send home!

primary punch artic practice

3. Primary Punch has some wonderful home practice worksheets that are print n’ go!

erik mini homework r

4. Erik Raj has these super fun Mini homework sheets for articulation.  They have great silly questions with the /r/ phoneme that students can discuss at home.  Great resource for working on carry over!  Plus, it doesn’t waste lots of paper.  I will have my students try to discuss the question with a friend, the teacher and a parent.

vocalic r flashcards

Speech Therapy Materials For /R/

5. My print n’ go flashcards have been very useful in my speech room.  You can either print up, hole punch and hold on a key ring or staple together.  I started putting my flashcards in plastic cover protectors and having students cross off the words as they say their /r/ sound.  Makes for easy therapy prep and LOTS of practice.  I store in a three hole punch folder, so I can send home with the student if I want them to practice over the weekend.

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6. Sublime Speech has these handy Articulation Strips for /r/ that are great to work on /r/ at the word and single sentence level. They are easy to store and have visual cues on the strips to help with reminding students to think about their /r/.

r for homework

7. Miss V’s Speech World has a great  52 Weekly /r/ homework worksheets product that makes planning home practice activities a breeze!!  They last for the entire week and have creative fun activities for the students to complete.

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8.  Dollar Challenge Articulation Activity from Speech Room News is a great activity to get students to get 100 trials per session.  She includes /r/ initial, r-blends and vocalic r sheets as well as homework sheets!!

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9. Articulation Secret Codes from Kiwi Speech are fun worksheets that keep the students engaged while you are drilling with each student in the group.  These are great for home practice activities too!

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10.  Busy Bee Speech has a great product to help with working on generalizing speech sounds into spontaneous speech.  Her Articulation Carry-Over Activities are perfect for therapy sessions or sending home to work on structured conversation.

 

What resources do you use and love for treating the /r/ phoneme?  I would love to add some more resources to my therapy materials stash.  Did I mention that I have 10 kids working on /r/ this year?

Expected and Unexpected Behaviors: A Quick Tip On How to Work On Self Monitoring Skills

I use the vocabulary terms expected and unexpected behaviors from Social Thinking to identify behaviors students are exhibited in different social situations. Expected and unexpected behaviors allows me to acknowledge and praise my students when they are being “expected” for the situation as well as directly let them know when they are being unexpected without lecturing them for 2 minutes about why something is not okay to do.

expected vs. unexpected behaviorsLast year at the middle school, I primarily used expected vs. unexpected terms with my social emotional students as well as my students with social skill deficits.  They learned the terms very quickly; however, when I would verbally point out their behavior (both good and not so good), I got two responses.  I either received defensive comments and student denial about the action/words/tone of the behavior or continued behavior in which I was verbally monitoring their behavior throughout the entire session.

As I would further explain how my students behavior was making me feel, I was met with resistance, rude overtures and sometimes escalated behaviors.  Most people don’t like to be told they are being unexpected! The struggle with our students with social skill deficits is that they do not naturally pick up on social cues to adjust their behavior independently.  SOMEONE has to call them out, so they can learn to survive in the world. Most jobs rely heavily on being able to successfully interactive with other people and if you fail at that, it doesn’t matter if you are an amazing at your job because people remember how they feel rather than the actual job that was performed.

expected vs. unexpected behaviorsI decided that I would implement a visual monitoring system, so that I could take informal data about the percentage of time the student was exhibiting expected behavior, provide a visual cue (so, I could reduce verbal cues aka lectures), and use as an incentive to point out successes with expected behaviors.  Download my easy template HERE or just click on the photo above.  I just glued to construction paper and laminated, so I could use a dry erase marker with it.

During the session, I let the student know that I will be visually tracking their behavior. If they have more unexpected behaviors than expected, they do not earn their incentive (for my higher students, I did 5 stars = hot cheetos, jolly rancher, ipad time, game, etc).  As I see behaviors, I mark expected or unexpected.  If they are being unexpected, I mark unexpected and ignore undesirably comments/behaviors.  I quickly try to mark expected to show the student that I am notice both good and bad behaviors.

With one student in particular, every time I tried to explain that his comments were sounding very rude, I would get a big argument about how he was not doing A,B, or C.  I got the okay from parents to address his behaviors with the terms kind words/tone vs. rude words/tone.  This student would either use rude words or he would say something in a very rude tone for very minimal things such as “I don’t want to play a game” or “I will not seat over there.” I did the exact same system and did not verbally engage the student when I marked rude comments.  He quickly figured out that he had to adjust his behavior to kind because he really didn’t like seeing marks on the rude side. This worked for most of my students, but some students may escalate in behavior if they see the “negative” side, so that is something to consider when using this.

How do you work on self monitoring skills? I would love to add more tools in my toolbox!

The dabbling speechie

 

Social Behavior Mapping Poster: A Social Thinking Therapy Resource

Social Behavior Mapping Poster: A Social Thinking Therapy Resource

Breaking down social situations and the skills needed to be successful in those situations can be difficult. Social language is very complex and one wrong move can destroy a social exchange. Today, I wanted to show you how you can use social behavior mapping in speech therapy to teach perspective taking and how a person’s behavior affects others.

Using social behavior mapping to teach social skills to older students.

I am a BIG fan of materials that are easy to store, require little to no prep and can be used flexibly in therapy.  Today, I am going to share a great resource from Social Thinking.  If you aren’t familiar with the social thinking curriculum, I would recommend buying their Thinking About You, Thinking About Me book or Think Social! book to get started.  They are awesome resources that will help enhance your social skills therapy! Today, I am going to be sharing about there Social Behavior Mapping Poster.

Social Behavior Mapping Poster

Social Behavior Mapping Dry Erase Poster is a tool to help visually show your students the effects of someone’s behavior in a certain situations, both expected and unexpected.

Some of the vocabulary taught with this curriculum, uses the terms expected behavior and unexpected behavior.  In different social contexts, we have to adjust our behavior, so that we are being expected because we want people to have pleasant, good thoughts about us.  For example, when we are watching a football game, it is expected to scream and cheer loudly at the television.  However, if we did that behavior at a library, we would be exhibiting unexpected behaviors because what is expected at the library is for everyone to whisper or stay quiet while looking for books.

For our students with social skill deficits, understanding how their “expected” and “unexpected” behaviors affect people is very difficult. They struggle with picking up on non-verbal cues, tone of voice and interpreting ambiguous/sarcastic verbal messages. Some of my students struggle with “seeing” how their behavior affects others as well as understanding that you have to change your behavior in different contexts.

social behavior map 2This poster allows the therapist or student to write information on the poster with a dry erase marker, so you can use it all the time.  This allows the therapist to tailor the lesson to specific situations the student may need to process through.

What the Social Behavior Mapping Poster Includes

There are four columns with different questions to answer about the behaviors. Here is what is listed in the four columns:

  • My behavior that is expected/unexpected for the situation
  • Others feelings about our behaviors
  • How others treat me based on how they feel about my behavior
  • How I feel based on how I am treated in the situation

You can chose a general situation such as “lunch time” and map out behaviors that are general to all students, or you can tailor the behavior mapping specific to what the student is exhibiting during that time.  I have done both because I have some students that become very resistant and escalated in behavior when I point out their not so great behavior.

I love how we can analyze the different feelings/emotions others may feel as well as how the person may be feeling.  We can compare/contrast the affects of expected/unexpected behavior and then think of ways to use more expected behavior in that situation.  I am also able to incorporate “thinking bubbles vs. talking bubbles” with this lesson as well.

The only downfall of using a dry erase poster is that you don’t have anything tangible to send home with parents or to give to teachers.  So, a quick fix I thought of was snapping a photo with your IPAD or phone and emailing it to parents/teachers!

This poster is only $13!! What a deal! I have found working at the middle school that less is more in terms of materials and this helped me tremendously with planning effective therapy.  This is a great tool to use as a warm up if you are having students practice having expected behaviors when playing a game, having a conversation, working in a group, etc.  It gets their brains ready to be social thinkers.  Do you have this poster?  What do you love about using it?

Social Thinking wants to give one of MY followers a Social Behavior Mapping Poster!!! Enter below to win.

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News-O-Matic App (My FAVORITIST app Ever)!

News-O-Matic App (My FAVORITIST app Ever)!

news o matic in speech therapy

Today, I am going to share one of my MOST favorite apps out there!  It’s called the News O Matic App.  News O Matic App is basically an interactive newspaper that is kid friendly and filled with articles about current events.  This app has SAVED me tons of time in terms of prep work. Not to mention, my middle schoolers love using the News O Matic App.  We are covering lots of great language using this app.  The News O Matic App creators write 5 articles a day and there are videos, pictures, selected vocabulary with definitions from the article and lots more!

Youtube Video On News-O-Matic

Here is a youtube video to see what the app looks like and what is featured each day.  You can also go on Press4kids to get more information and ask questions about this app and how to use it with your students and/or classroom.

How to use New-o-matic app in speech therapy. It is a great app for increasing engagement while working on articulation, inferencing, grammar and language development.

What is News-O-Matic

Quoted from this article News-O-Matic “features five daily stories, each reviewed by an on-staff psychologist to ensure safety, covering national and international news, sports, arts, science and more. The app is designed to encourage students to engage with the stories through drawings, writing, voting for their favorite articles and asking interview questions of politicians, athletes and others.”

news o matic guideOnce you are registered with your app, the new-o-matics folks email you weekly with a guide for the articles for the week.  They include comprehension questions with choices and graphic organizers to work on different concepts.  This week it is working on finding details from the text.

news o matic extra funThere are daily games that can be played, an area where students can draw picture from one of the articles and they can also write in to New-o-matic with an opinion or share why they like the app!

Why I love News-O-Matic

  • It is updated every day with new articles and content, so I have new therapy materials every day.
  • This app has a wide variety of topics that appeal to all my students interests.  It gives the student’s a choice for which article they want to read.
  • This app already has vocabulary highlighted from the text with definitions, so you don’t have to prep finding word definitions in the article.
  • I am emailed weekly with a teacher’s guide including comprehension questions I could ask the students.
  • This app is colorful, uses real photos and contains videos on many of the articles, so your lesson can be easily adapted and scaffolded for your visual learners.
  • This app has the capability of the student reading to themselves or you can have the text read out loud if reading fluency is an issue.
  • There are 5 articles on one day, so my student’s have a choice for what they want to learn about.  The students are more motivated to learn about things that interest them.
  • The articles can be used to target articulation, speech fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, grammar, summarizing,etc.
  • You can adjust the reading level to fit your student’s needs, which is pretty cool.
  • There is a drawing section in which the student can draw a picture.  This is a great way for students to work on visualizing.  They can draw a picture to help them remember the new vocabulary words they learned, the main idea of the article or what the article made them feel/think.
  • The use of non-fiction text is very much common core aligned, so this would match up with lots of your goals (wh-question, main idea, summarizing, cause/effect).
  • I learn stuff too!! I get to stay up-to-date right along side my students and learn about things that I might not have caught in a “grown up” article.

Considerations before buying News-O-Matic

  • You need internet connection, so if you do not have access to wifi in your room, then you will have trouble gaining access to this app.
  • This is a free app to access some of the articles, but you have to pay the subscription fee to get ALL the features of the app.  You also have to buy the app every year to get all the features.
  • The articles are reviewed by a psychologist before they are put on the app, but some of the topics or news stories could be sensitive to your students based on their cultural beliefs.  Always a good idea to preview the articles before discussing in a group or class if possible.

I am still learning more about this app and how I can incorporate it in the therapy.  This is one of my go-to materials for therapy when I have mixed language groups or if my students are really not thrilled with my lesson.  All in all, this is definitely a MUST HAVE for any SLP, especially those that have high caseloads, travel to multiple sites or work with upper elementary/middle school/high school level students.

Grab the school edition on itunes and get a full year subscription for $9.99.

Zones of Regulation Activities to Build Social Skills

Zones of Regulation Activities to Build Social Skills

Are you familiar with the zones of regulation curriculum? It is a popular self regulation curriculum that helps students communicate how they are feeling. SLPs can use zones of regulation activities to help students initiate communication, explain how they are feeling, or what they are needing. Zones of regulation activities can also help students identify how others are feeling and what words/actions they should do when someone is feeling a certain emotion.

Resources and ideas for teaching zones of regulation to build social communication. Lots of great ideas and fun youtube videos.

At my middle school, I have students on the Autism Spectrum that have a difficult time with regulating their emotions. They need visual and verbal prompts to recognize what type of emotion/feeling they are experiencing in situations.  An SLP can work on teaching self-regulation by using the zones of regulation curriculum in therapy. These terms and strategies help improve a child’s ability to express their emotion and make requests/comments for what they need in a social situation.

What is zones of regulation?

Zones of regulation is a curriculum (amazon affiliate links included for your convenience) designed to help children independently self regulate their actions by teaching them to recognize how their body is feeling. They use colors to explain the different emotions. By teaching these zones, students can learn to increase communication initiations by sharing how they are feeling and what activities they need to do to help them stay in the green zone. Increasing communication around emotions helps decrease unwanted behaviors!

  • Blue zone- tired, sleepy, bored, sad
  • Green zone- calm, ready, happy, focused, content
  • Yellow zone- excited, anxious, nervous, surprised, worried, silly
  • Red zone- furious, angry, rage, out of control

If you want to read more about the program and get more of the worksheets, head over to Zones of Regulation website.

Bulletin Boards For Zones Of Regulation

This is a great poster to hang in your room as a visual and use with your students to generate strategies to help them stay or get to a certain zone.  Grab a poster for your speech room on Social Thinking.

My SDC teacher Janelle McDaniel made this cute visual bulletin board for her classroom.  I think it is awesome! She had the different zones and then pasted the emotions that go on the zones as a visual reminder for students.

Look what else they made in the SDC classroom!  The SDC teacher grabbed free paint chip samples from Home Depot and had the kids write the different emotions for the zones.  She took pictures of the students acting out the different zones and posted them in the classroom.

Zones Of Regulation Activities For Your Speech Therapy Sessions

I dabbled around on the internet in search of some more “Zones” activities and this is what I found!

Free break cards Zones of Regulation Break Cards

Speechy Musings Self Regulation Handouts and Size of the Problem Detectives

A Sprinkle of Speech What size is your problem?

Speech Paths- How Would Others Feel? Interactive Activity for Middle/High School

The Zones of Regulation App (haven’t tried this app yet, but it looks like it could be great)!

Fun with Firsties made a very cool bulletin board in her class with all the ZONES and has some great strategies on how to make a calm down area.

There are visuals in the ZONES book that you can photo copy and use as visuals.  The Lower Elementary Cottage made a “tools” book for students to pick a tool for a ZONE to help them get back to green.  If they successfully use the tool, they earn a tool coupon in which they can save up to earn a prize.

The Incredible 5 Point Scale– A great visual resource to visually show students how to regulate their emotions in social situations.

5 Point Scale for Adolescent & Adults– is a curriculum designed for older students and adults.

Youtube Videos For Zones Of Regulation Activities

I found some hilarious video clips on youtube from one of my SDC teachers.  They show the different zones people can be in using clips from the Big Bang Theory!

Sheldon in the yellow zone! Super funny!!

Love this clip for the blue zone. The kids got a kick out of this. We were also able to talk about how the other character was feeling too and why it may be unexpected to ask a friend to rub Vics on your chest when you are sick.

Red zone with Sheldon! This one made me laugh the most!!

This video is of Sheldon in the green zone. Some of my kiddos could relate to feeling the most calm when they are left alone, lol.

This video has LOTS of Zones going on! I recommend starting the video at about 1:28 seconds because Kevin Hart says “bitch” in the video. My students LOVE Kevin Hart and they sure got more interested about ZONES when we watched this clip.  What activities have you done with the Zones of Regulation?  I would love to add some more ideas to my stash of tricks!!

Need more videos to help teach the Zones of Regulation?

Follow my playlist on youtube for videos that help teach the Zones of Regulation HERE.

I used video clips from the movie Elf during the holidays to work on perspective taking and what “zone” people were in.  Check out my blog post HERE!


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