Snow Sensory Bin with Plow Trucks

Snow Sensory Bin with Plow Trucks

Raise your hand if you had some students on your caseload that LOVE, LOVE, LOVE cars and trucks!? Why not theme smash this winter to talk about winter weather and winter vehicles using this engaging snow sensory bin?

It’s really easy to setup and you can adapt it to target a LOT of different goals. Plus, your students will be so excited to ditch the worksheets and keep their hands busy while they plow the snow to reveal their speech or language target. Not only can you work on your students targets with the bin, you can also build language using verbs and vocabulary related to winter weather and transportation.

Items You Need For Your Sensory Bin

What I love about this snow sensory bin is that you may already have all of the items. If not, you can grab the list of items here or ask some of your families if they have extra toy trucks or want to donate white Pom Pom balls for speech.

-A container (any type will do, but for this bin, I like the shallow Sterlite containers from Target)

-White Pom Pom Balls (the balls in the pictures are .5 inches that I got on Amazon HERE, this is an Amazon affiliate link) HERE is the link to the 1 inch Pom Pom balls.

-Toy trucks for plowing the snow. You can get this set HERE on Amazon (affiliate link included) that are pull back, so you can reuse them for other fun activities for stop/go, races, etc.

-Picture targets to put on the bottom of the bin to have your students practice their speech or language targets. In the Themed Therapy SLP membership, there are themed verb and vocabulary cards featured in this bin. Get on the waitlist for when the membership opens up again in summer 2022 HERE.

-Put picture scenes or pages of pictures to have at the bottom of the bin. Switch out the pictures for your mixed groups by using the Any Craft Companion pictures.

Use this snow sensory bin to incorporate plow trucks and moving snow! They can push the snow away to reveal their speech and language targets.
Use this snow sensory bin to cover speech and language goals with your elementary students!

Sensory Bin Organization Tips

Use this snow sensory bin to cover a lot of speech therapy goals in your next session!

When I create sensory bins, I tend to keep 2 main container boxes and store the fillers and materials in bigger tubs. In the past, I was the queen of just shoving things in the bins or throwing them in a plastic gallon bag. Recently, I have started to use zipper pouches to keep the pieces organized. These 13 by 9-inch pouches (affiliate links included) are large enough to store printables and material pieces. 

Then, you can purchase smaller pouches to keep figurines, props, and manipulatives that you like to add to that bin. You can also store your filler to keep all the moving parts of the bin in one spot. Then, just toss it in your larger bin and switch out. For more ideas on how to make sensory bins, head to this BLOG POST. If you are looking for more ways to organize your theme-based materials, check out this post.

Use this snow sensory bin to have students plow the snow to reveal the pictures in your next speech therapy session!

How to Use the Snow Sensory Bin

Have students plow snow away with toy trucks to reveal their speech and language target using this snow sensory bin.

This bin is so versatile because you can interchange picture sheets to match your student’s targets. You can have students plow the snow away to reveal their target. Have them practice the word a certain number of times, use it in a sentence, describe it by attributes, or name other items in that category group.

Create sentence strips on a piece of paper such as, “The truck drove over ______” or “Push the snow off of ______.”

For students working on expanding communication functions, you can work on requesting more of an action, commenting, initiating, and answering wh-questions.

Target AAC CORE words for go, stop, look, all done, more, again, yes, no, here, there, turn, my

How would you use this sensory bin in therapy? Let me know in the comments!

 

Need More Winter Sensory Bin Ideas?

Having engaging sensory bins that go with your winter theme will help you plan extension activities for your mixed groups with ease! Here is a blog post with a sensory bin incorporating penguins! This BLOG POST shares different fillers that go well for a winter theme and ideas for working on winter vocabulary.

If you are looking for ready-to-go sensory bin printables, I recommend the Mitten Match-Up or the winter sensory bin companion in my TPT store. Just click the images below to grab these sets. 

Use this winter sensory bin to work on lots of different speech and language targets.
Use winter vocabulary to target a variety of speech and language concepts using this winter sensory bin for speech therapy
Lucky Green Sensory Bin for Speech Therapy

Lucky Green Sensory Bin for Speech Therapy

Do you need an activity for St. Patrick’s Day that will cover lots of goals and be adaptable for many ages? I have just the sensory bin for you! This lucky green sensory bin is easy to make and will be great for your younger students and older ones too. Don’t you love it when you have materials that can be used across a lot of ages? This lucky green sensory bin will help you implement engaging therapy during the crazy month of March when all the paperwork is due.

 

I started using festive St. Patrick’s Day sensory bins many years ago and this lucky green sensory bin is still a hit. Check out this post for more March bin ideas. 

How to Make a Lucky Green Sensory Bin

All you need is a bin, some shredded green paper and green items from around your speech room. If you need more ideas for what types of bins to use, head to this blog post.

For my lucky green sensory bin, I used the following items (Amazon Affiliate links are included for your convenience. I get a small commission when you use these links):

Aluminum Pan (these make great sensory bin containers)

Shredded green wrapping paper from the Dollar Tree or green grass for Easter baskets

-Green toys and items from around my room

If you need ideas for green items, I grabbed vegetables and fruit from my play food, cars, insects, green cups, green markers and crayons, play money, green toy clothing items, or items from your Alphabet Sounds Tubs from Lakeshore Learning. I would love to know what green items you have found, so I can grab materials to add in my future lucky green sensory bins. You can also head to the Dollar Tree and find items that are green too.

Need an activity to cover mixed groups for St. Patrick’s Day? Go around your speech room and find your green toys and items. Throw them in a sensory bin and now you have the perfect speech and language sensory bin. Use this lucky green sensory bin to target grammar, vocabulary, describing, and articulation and phonology.

Can You Find It? Lucky Green Sensory Bin Activity

One activity that I love to play to work on noun-functions is my Can You Find It? Game. I put items in the bin and then give clues to my students. Can you find something that you eat? Or, Can you find something that you wear?

Because I don’t have a TON of real items, I made a sensory bin activity using different green items. It includes visual supports, and visual sentence frames to work on describing the items. If you need this activity, head to my TPT store. You won’t regret having a sensory bin companion that will last you the whole month of March (lesson plans are finished, so you can focus on therapy without the stress.)

See the pictures below to check out some of the items and visuals included in this resource. 

Ways to Use the Green Sensory Bin

Need an activity to cover mixed groups for St. Patrick’s Day? Go around your speech room and find your green toys and items. Throw them in a sensory bin and now you have the perfect speech and language sensory bin. Use this lucky green sensory bin to target grammar, vocabulary, describing, and articulation and phonology.
Need an activity to cover mixed groups for St. Patrick’s Day? Go around your speech room and find your green toys and items. Throw them in a sensory bin and now you have the perfect speech and language sensory bin. Use this lucky green sensory bin to target grammar, vocabulary, describing, and articulation and phonology.
You can use this bin to cover your speech and language goals in therapy. For articulation and speech sound students, they can hunt for items with their speech sound. Have your students hide an item in the green grass after they produce their target sound 5 times.

 

For your students working on grammar and syntax, work on naming the items with a plural tense marker. Or, have them create sentences with adjectives, prepositional phrases, and the correct noun-verb agreement.

 

This green sensory bin has so many opportunities for building vocabulary. Have your students describe the items in the bin by attributes. Or, have them look for items in specific category groups. Work on answering wh- questions while using the items. You can cover “yes/no” questions and “Who, What, Where, When, and Why” questions.

 

For articulation carryover, have your students create a silly story using the items in the green bin. This can work with well with your language students too. You can have them work on story retell and oral narration.

 

How would you use this bin in therapy? Leave a comment below and share your therapy ideas! Sharing an idea may help another SLP with using this bin.

 

Are you looking for more St. Patrick’s Day themed ideas? Head to this blog post and your lesson planning will be a breeze!!

If you are wanting to use more sensory bins during March, head to this blog post for other sensory bins you can make. You can also plan some spring sensory bins by heading to this blog post.

Make sure you download my FREE ultimate sensory bin guide (click the pink button above to grab) and make a fun baby chick sensory bin. If you head to this blog post, you can make a chicken inferencing sensory bin activity (it’s a free download on that post.)

I am always looking for sensory bin inspiration and I am sure other SLPs are too. You can share your sensory bins on Instagram using the #slpsensorybin hashtag. If you are looking for new ideas, I recommend following that hashtag to get sensory bin updates in your feed.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar in Speech Therapy

The Very Hungry Caterpillar in Speech Therapy

Where are all my Very Hungry Caterpillar fans? Using The Very Hungry Caterpillar in speech therapy is a great addition to your bug theme. I especially enjoy this book because I can incorporate a food theme as well.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar activities and resources for speech therapy #slpeeps

The Very Hungry Caterpillar in Speech Therapy

The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle is a classic children’s book for younger students. I use this book every year with my K-2 students. This board book comes with  plush toy for The Very Hungry Caterpillar which is pretty great if you want a real caterpillar to go with your lesson. There are so many ways to adapt and use this book in therapy.

Find resources, therapy ideas and activities to work on speech and language goals using The Very Hungry Caterpillar in Speech Therapy.

During the spring months, I love incorporating bugs into my therapy. The cool thing about an insect theme is that bugs are around all year long, so you can use this theme any time of the year. My favorite times to do bugs are Spring and Summer because that’s when those creepy crawlers come out for kids to see!

Toys and Activities for The Very Hungry Caterpillar

When I need toys, games, books or anything really, I tend to look on Amazon first. As a busy SLP and mom, I just don’t always have the time to go hunting around stores for resources. There are a TON of Very Hungry Caterpillar toys and resources for extension activities. Here are some that I found on Amazon (amazon affiliate links included for your convenience):

Caterpillar Bean Bag Toy that you can use

Very Hungry Caterpillar plush toy for sensory bin

Let’s feed the Caterpillar Game for extension activity

Feed the caterpillar magnetic puzzle

Reversible Caterpillar to butterfly stuffed animal

Caterpillar stacking blocks for oral narration

Flannel felt pieces from the story to work on oral narration

Find resources, therapy ideas and activities to work on speech and language goals using The Very Hungry Caterpillar in Speech Therapy.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar Craft Ideas

I enjoy doing crafts as part of my push in lessons to support basic concepts and social skills. When we read The Very Hungry Caterpillar, we made these sponge caterpillar crafts. It was a pretty easy craft to prep and we worked on requesting items, learning basic concepts and then initiating conversation by showing peers our craft.

Crafts for The Very Hungry Caterpillar. Find resources, therapy ideas and activities to work on speech and language goals using The Very Hungry Caterpillar in Speech Therapy.

Here is how I transported everything to the classroom. I found the sponges at the dollar store, used white 11 by 17 craft paper, eye stickers, black pipe cleaners cut up, and black marker to draw the legs.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar in Speech Therapy. I have containers that I put all my items for my push in speech therapy lessons, so I have all the supplies in one place. This is for a caterpillar craft for kids.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar Speech & Language Activities

If you want DIY therapy ideas, just type in The Very Hungry Caterpillar activities into Pinterest and you will find so much inspiration! You can follow my Very Hungry Caterpillar Speech Therapy Pinterest board for more ideas!

Articulation ideas: Go on a sound hunt with the pictures from the story. Have students look and listen for words that have their sound.

Basic Concepts: Follow directions with basic concepts using props from the story.

Category ideas: Sort fruits, vegetables and junk food. Or sort food vs. insects. You can discuss if a food is healthy or junk food.

Vocabulary: Practice describing a caterpillar and butterfly by attributes. Do the same thing with the food in the story. Have a taste test to describe fruit as crunchy, juicy, sweet, sour, color, size, shape and category.

Grammar: Target present and past tense for verbs, as well as, marking plural nouns that happened in the story. The students can describe the verb actions in each picture. The caterpillar ate four strawberries.

More Language Ideas For The Very Hungry Caterpillar

Listening Comprehension: Students can practice answering wh-questions from the story. One way that I scaffold the story for some students is by asking a question every page or every 2-3 sentences. When I read the story, I will read it out loud all the way through. Then, I will use the book page by page to talk about all the details in the story. The next session when I read the story to the kids, I will stop and ask questions. At the end, we will retell the story together.

Oral Narration: Students can work on sequencing and story elements using The Very Hungry Caterpillar. This book is great for students that need visual supports to remember a story because the story has lots of visuals to support the story.

Social Skills: When you create a caterpillar or butterfly craft only put one set of art supplies on the table. Students have to practice initiating, waiting, and sharing supplies with another student while creating the craft.

FUN Idea For Your K-2 Push-In Language Lesson

During my SDC K-2 push-in language lesson, we read the book, described the caterpillar and then did the caterpillar craft. The next session, I read a new caterpillar book and we then went on a bug hunt outside! You can hide insects in the grass and have students look for bugs! I am a BIG fan of TOOBS and used my insect TOOBS (amazon affiliate link) for this activity. These are the fruits and vegetable TOOB items (amazon affiliate link) I would use if you have the students pretend to be hungry caterpillars.

Easy Tip Lesson Planning Tip For SLPs with High Caseloads

When I had 75-83 students on my caseload with two Autism Special Day Classrooms and one mild-mod Special Day Classroom, I would plan activities with a similar theme for as many groups as I could. I felt that it was easier for me to learn how to teach the language and scaffold skills if I was using the same concepts for a lot of different students. I would find ways to adapt the theme for students abilities, interests and ages. So, often times, I read this book 7-10 times in a day. It was hard to keep the energy up, but it definitely made me feel less stress when planning lessons. So older students, I may not actually read The Very Hungry Caterpillar, but I might find a non-fiction passage or video to learn about caterpillars.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar in Speech Therapy

Need an insect sensory bin activity to use after reading The Very Hungry Caterpillar, then check out this blog post for how to make one! What toys and resources have you found for this book that you love using?

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