Using the DUBSMASH app in speech therapy!

Using the DUBSMASH app in speech therapy!

Have you ever tried using the dubsmash app in speech therapy?  It’s FREE and super entertaining.  I wanted to share how I used the dubsmash app in speech therapy with my middle school students. I also prepared a little DUBSMASH video for your viewing pleasure, scroll down to the bottom of this post!

using the dubsmash app in speech therapy

If you haven’t heard of dubsmash, You can download the app HERE! Dubsmash is an app that allows people to lip sync and video themselves performing a TV show, movie or music clip.  It’s pretty entertaining and my family has enjoyed playing around with it.

Last year, when I worked with middle school students, I used it with my life skills students.  Big Disclaimer here: Make sure you have previewed and chosen which soundbites you want to use.  When I was experimenting at home with the app, I would sometimes click on a dub that looked “kid friendly” and was met with flavorful language to say the least.

I used the app mostly to engage my students who were working on functional social language and as reinforcement for participating in the group.  This is what I discovered with trying out this app!  I saw smiles emerge from my middle school students when I showed it to them.  Initiating and commenting increased without me “teacher” prompting them to talk. I built trust and a relationship with my students using this app.

Here are a few other ways I thought you could use this app in therapy:

  • You can work on identifying emotions based on the tone of voice of the soundbite.
  • Work on facial expressions when the students create their dub.
  • Students can use their AAC devices to request, make comments, and engage how they feel about the dubsmash.
  • Expressing why you liked a dubsmash clip with a conjunction such as “I really liked this dubsmash because…….”
  • Practice turn taking and waiting.  Also, working on sharing positive comments even if you don’t like the person’s dubsmash.
  • Give your students a social situation and then they have to chose which dubsmash would fit how the person could be feel or thinking during the social situation.

And last, but not least, use the dubsmash in speech therapy to send to your SLP colleagues and SPED team. You can send dubsmash videos via facebook messenger and text messages!  Dubsmash is all about bringing the joy to communication and I dig it!!

using the dubsmash app in speech therapy

So, if you have been following me for a while, you know that I like to have FUN!  I invited, I mean coerced, I mean black mailed all my speech therapy blogger buddies to help me make a Dubsmash compilation.  Check it out!!  We had so much fun.

How would you use the dubsmash app in speech therapy?

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Expected and Unexpected Behaviors: A Quick Tip On How to Work On Self Monitoring Skills

I use the vocabulary terms expected and unexpected behaviors from Social Thinking to identify behaviors students are exhibited in different social situations. Expected and unexpected behaviors allows me to acknowledge and praise my students when they are being “expected” for the situation as well as directly let them know when they are being unexpected without lecturing them for 2 minutes about why something is not okay to do.

expected vs. unexpected behaviorsLast year at the middle school, I primarily used expected vs. unexpected terms with my social emotional students as well as my students with social skill deficits.  They learned the terms very quickly; however, when I would verbally point out their behavior (both good and not so good), I got two responses.  I either received defensive comments and student denial about the action/words/tone of the behavior or continued behavior in which I was verbally monitoring their behavior throughout the entire session.

As I would further explain how my students behavior was making me feel, I was met with resistance, rude overtures and sometimes escalated behaviors.  Most people don’t like to be told they are being unexpected! The struggle with our students with social skill deficits is that they do not naturally pick up on social cues to adjust their behavior independently.  SOMEONE has to call them out, so they can learn to survive in the world. Most jobs rely heavily on being able to successfully interactive with other people and if you fail at that, it doesn’t matter if you are an amazing at your job because people remember how they feel rather than the actual job that was performed.

expected vs. unexpected behaviorsI decided that I would implement a visual monitoring system, so that I could take informal data about the percentage of time the student was exhibiting expected behavior, provide a visual cue (so, I could reduce verbal cues aka lectures), and use as an incentive to point out successes with expected behaviors.  Download my easy template HERE or just click on the photo above.  I just glued to construction paper and laminated, so I could use a dry erase marker with it.

During the session, I let the student know that I will be visually tracking their behavior. If they have more unexpected behaviors than expected, they do not earn their incentive (for my higher students, I did 5 stars = hot cheetos, jolly rancher, ipad time, game, etc).  As I see behaviors, I mark expected or unexpected.  If they are being unexpected, I mark unexpected and ignore undesirably comments/behaviors.  I quickly try to mark expected to show the student that I am notice both good and bad behaviors.

With one student in particular, every time I tried to explain that his comments were sounding very rude, I would get a big argument about how he was not doing A,B, or C.  I got the okay from parents to address his behaviors with the terms kind words/tone vs. rude words/tone.  This student would either use rude words or he would say something in a very rude tone for very minimal things such as “I don’t want to play a game” or “I will not seat over there.” I did the exact same system and did not verbally engage the student when I marked rude comments.  He quickly figured out that he had to adjust his behavior to kind because he really didn’t like seeing marks on the rude side. This worked for most of my students, but some students may escalate in behavior if they see the “negative” side, so that is something to consider when using this.

How do you work on self monitoring skills? I would love to add more tools in my toolbox!

The dabbling speechie

 

Social Behavior Mapping Poster: A Social Thinking Therapy Resource

Social Behavior Mapping Poster: A Social Thinking Therapy Resource

Breaking down social situations and the skills needed to be successful in those situations can be difficult. Social language is very complex and one wrong move can destroy a social exchange. Today, I wanted to show you how you can use social behavior mapping in speech therapy to teach perspective taking and how a person’s behavior affects others.

Using social behavior mapping to teach social skills to older students.

I am a BIG fan of materials that are easy to store, require little to no prep and can be used flexibly in therapy.  Today, I am going to share a great resource from Social Thinking.  If you aren’t familiar with the social thinking curriculum, I would recommend buying their Thinking About You, Thinking About Me book or Think Social! book to get started.  They are awesome resources that will help enhance your social skills therapy! Today, I am going to be sharing about there Social Behavior Mapping Poster.

Social Behavior Mapping Poster

Social Behavior Mapping Dry Erase Poster is a tool to help visually show your students the effects of someone’s behavior in a certain situations, both expected and unexpected.

Some of the vocabulary taught with this curriculum, uses the terms expected behavior and unexpected behavior.  In different social contexts, we have to adjust our behavior, so that we are being expected because we want people to have pleasant, good thoughts about us.  For example, when we are watching a football game, it is expected to scream and cheer loudly at the television.  However, if we did that behavior at a library, we would be exhibiting unexpected behaviors because what is expected at the library is for everyone to whisper or stay quiet while looking for books.

For our students with social skill deficits, understanding how their “expected” and “unexpected” behaviors affect people is very difficult. They struggle with picking up on non-verbal cues, tone of voice and interpreting ambiguous/sarcastic verbal messages. Some of my students struggle with “seeing” how their behavior affects others as well as understanding that you have to change your behavior in different contexts.

social behavior map 2This poster allows the therapist or student to write information on the poster with a dry erase marker, so you can use it all the time.  This allows the therapist to tailor the lesson to specific situations the student may need to process through.

What the Social Behavior Mapping Poster Includes

There are four columns with different questions to answer about the behaviors. Here is what is listed in the four columns:

  • My behavior that is expected/unexpected for the situation
  • Others feelings about our behaviors
  • How others treat me based on how they feel about my behavior
  • How I feel based on how I am treated in the situation

You can chose a general situation such as “lunch time” and map out behaviors that are general to all students, or you can tailor the behavior mapping specific to what the student is exhibiting during that time.  I have done both because I have some students that become very resistant and escalated in behavior when I point out their not so great behavior.

I love how we can analyze the different feelings/emotions others may feel as well as how the person may be feeling.  We can compare/contrast the affects of expected/unexpected behavior and then think of ways to use more expected behavior in that situation.  I am also able to incorporate “thinking bubbles vs. talking bubbles” with this lesson as well.

The only downfall of using a dry erase poster is that you don’t have anything tangible to send home with parents or to give to teachers.  So, a quick fix I thought of was snapping a photo with your IPAD or phone and emailing it to parents/teachers!

This poster is only $13!! What a deal! I have found working at the middle school that less is more in terms of materials and this helped me tremendously with planning effective therapy.  This is a great tool to use as a warm up if you are having students practice having expected behaviors when playing a game, having a conversation, working in a group, etc.  It gets their brains ready to be social thinkers.  Do you have this poster?  What do you love about using it?

Social Thinking wants to give one of MY followers a Social Behavior Mapping Poster!!! Enter below to win.

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Zones of Regulation Activities to Build Social Skills

Zones of Regulation Activities to Build Social Skills

Are you familiar with the zones of regulation curriculum? It is a popular self regulation curriculum that helps students communicate how they are feeling. SLPs can use zones of regulation activities to help students initiate communication, explain how they are feeling, or what they are needing. Zones of regulation activities can also help students identify how others are feeling and what words/actions they should do when someone is feeling a certain emotion.

Resources and ideas for teaching zones of regulation to build social communication. Lots of great ideas and fun youtube videos.

At my middle school, I have students on the Autism Spectrum that have a difficult time with regulating their emotions. They need visual and verbal prompts to recognize what type of emotion/feeling they are experiencing in situations.  An SLP can work on teaching self-regulation by using the zones of regulation curriculum in therapy. These terms and strategies help improve a child’s ability to express their emotion and make requests/comments for what they need in a social situation.

What is zones of regulation?

Zones of regulation is a curriculum (amazon affiliate links included for your convenience) designed to help children independently self regulate their actions by teaching them to recognize how their body is feeling. They use colors to explain the different emotions. By teaching these zones, students can learn to increase communication initiations by sharing how they are feeling and what activities they need to do to help them stay in the green zone. Increasing communication around emotions helps decrease unwanted behaviors!

  • Blue zone- tired, sleepy, bored, sad
  • Green zone- calm, ready, happy, focused, content
  • Yellow zone- excited, anxious, nervous, surprised, worried, silly
  • Red zone- furious, angry, rage, out of control

If you want to read more about the program and get more of the worksheets, head over to Zones of Regulation website.

Bulletin Boards For Zones Of Regulation

This is a great poster to hang in your room as a visual and use with your students to generate strategies to help them stay or get to a certain zone.  Grab a poster for your speech room on Social Thinking.

My SDC teacher Janelle McDaniel made this cute visual bulletin board for her classroom.  I think it is awesome! She had the different zones and then pasted the emotions that go on the zones as a visual reminder for students.

Look what else they made in the SDC classroom!  The SDC teacher grabbed free paint chip samples from Home Depot and had the kids write the different emotions for the zones.  She took pictures of the students acting out the different zones and posted them in the classroom.

Zones Of Regulation Activities For Your Speech Therapy Sessions

I dabbled around on the internet in search of some more “Zones” activities and this is what I found!

Free break cards Zones of Regulation Break Cards

Speechy Musings Self Regulation Handouts and Size of the Problem Detectives

A Sprinkle of Speech What size is your problem?

Speech Paths- How Would Others Feel? Interactive Activity for Middle/High School

The Zones of Regulation App (haven’t tried this app yet, but it looks like it could be great)!

Fun with Firsties made a very cool bulletin board in her class with all the ZONES and has some great strategies on how to make a calm down area.

There are visuals in the ZONES book that you can photo copy and use as visuals.  The Lower Elementary Cottage made a “tools” book for students to pick a tool for a ZONE to help them get back to green.  If they successfully use the tool, they earn a tool coupon in which they can save up to earn a prize.

The Incredible 5 Point Scale– A great visual resource to visually show students how to regulate their emotions in social situations.

5 Point Scale for Adolescent & Adults– is a curriculum designed for older students and adults.

Youtube Videos For Zones Of Regulation Activities

I found some hilarious video clips on youtube from one of my SDC teachers.  They show the different zones people can be in using clips from the Big Bang Theory!

Sheldon in the yellow zone! Super funny!!

Love this clip for the blue zone. The kids got a kick out of this. We were also able to talk about how the other character was feeling too and why it may be unexpected to ask a friend to rub Vics on your chest when you are sick.

Red zone with Sheldon! This one made me laugh the most!!

This video is of Sheldon in the green zone. Some of my kiddos could relate to feeling the most calm when they are left alone, lol.

This video has LOTS of Zones going on! I recommend starting the video at about 1:28 seconds because Kevin Hart says “bitch” in the video. My students LOVE Kevin Hart and they sure got more interested about ZONES when we watched this clip.  What activities have you done with the Zones of Regulation?  I would love to add some more ideas to my stash of tricks!!

Need more videos to help teach the Zones of Regulation?

Follow my playlist on youtube for videos that help teach the Zones of Regulation HERE.

I used video clips from the movie Elf during the holidays to work on perspective taking and what “zone” people were in.  Check out my blog post HERE!


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Interview and conversation skills: Functional Communication With Aided Supports

At my middle school placement, I push in to the SDC functional skills classes to work on social skills and functional communication. I began thinking about life skills my students will need when they are adults.  Interview and conversation skills are very important for getting jobs as well as being a part of a community!

questions and interview long pinMost of the students in these classes have Intellectual Disabilities, but they are all verbal. Some students need visual supports to make novel utterances more independently.  It is pretty tough planning lessons for this bunch because there are various levels, so some need visuals and the lessons have to be middle school friendly even though most of the students are functioning around a 1st-2nd grade academic level.

As a team, we have been picking themes for the week and/or month to help guide our lesson planning.  I did these activities back at the beginning of the school year and then tried to make this pack more formal, so I could save the lesson plans for next year!

My kids are too young for practicing job interview questions, but I thought they still needed to work on how to ask/answer questions in conversation with peers and in more formal situations like talking with the PRINCIPAL!  Yes, my students were able to formally interview the principals using the “favorite” question guide.  There are three activities in this pack: greetings, turn taking in conversation with peers, and job interview skills.  I include a lesson plan with links to youtube videos that support these skills.  I have several students on the autism spectrum, so these videos are perfect for video modeling (evidenced based practice)!

First, I show the class the youtube video.  I embedded the greetings video that I found to give you an example.  Then, we break up into groups, or stay as a whole class to discuss expected vs. unexpected behaviors.  I will have the students and staff role play and the class rates if the students were expected or unexpected.expected vs. unexpected behaviors for conversationHere is an example of my “rate my communication” forms that I made!

I put velcro on one of my clear vinyl dry erase pouches to use with my expected vs. unexpected file folder activities.  These are great to do during the lesson and then allow the teacher to use them the rest of the week with students.  Some of my students can read well, so there is a sheet with just words and then a sheet with visual supports for those that need help with reading the words.

This video is perfect for showing turn taking with peers and seeing that other people are having thoughts about us when we are talking!  I loved this video!  My kids practiced asking each other about their favorite things and working on making comments too.  This was a great activity to help lead into asking/answering questions in a more formal setting.

interview and conversation #3

There are visuals for asking and answering questions with peers about their favorite things.  I also included Q and A visuals, to help some of my kids understand who should be asking the question and who is answering the question.

I showed the job interview video to talk about what to do during a job or formal interview.  My kids aren’t ready for practicing for job interviews, but I wanted them to try to practice talking with someone in a formal setting.  So, I asked my principals if they would be willing to help and they said “yes!”.  We have a follow up appointment coming soon to re-interview them.  We talked about how greetings with adults and professionals are different compared to their peers.  We also practiced what kind of body language we need to have during the interview.  I filmed them all and then we got to critique everyone’s performance!

I loved all these lessons and I hope you do too!!  The first three peeps to comment below with some cool activities you have been doing in your speech room, will get this pack for FREE!

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