Therapy Plans Archives - thedabblingspeechie
4 Tips To Pick A Theme For Your Caseload

4 Tips To Pick A Theme For Your Caseload

When I first began as an SLP, I started with a large caseload that fluctuated between 72-83 students. There was no time in my day to plan for those individual students. So, my brain immediately went to using theme-based lessons that I could adapt for all of my grade levels. Using theme-based lessons that are easily adapted helped me reduce my planning time (and brain power) by hours! I am heading into my 15th year as an SLP, and using themes continues to be a super helpful strategy! I want to share with you 4 tips for picking a great theme for your caseload!

Tip #1 : Pick A Theme That Is Motivating

Check out these 4 tips to help you pick a great theme for your caseload that can be adapted across all of your grade levels. Save hours of planning time by using themed therapy materials to cover your wide range of goals!

The #1 tip I have for selecting a theme is to make sure it’s something that is high interest and highly motivating for your students. This is a much easier task for my younger students than it is for my older elementary or middle school students. I can usually capture my younger students’ interest for any theme by simply incorporating dinosaurs, legos, or something shiny! My older students are not so easily entertained (as I’m sure many of you understand). Another SLP shared with me a little while ago that she likes to poll her older students about what they are interested in at the beginning of her school year. Her students’ answers help drive her lesson planning and theme selection. This is something that can easily be incorporated into your therapy plans for your first week back.

Why is this my #1 tip? The more we can build our students’ interest in the lessons and themes we are using, the more buy-in we’ll see, which we know leads to more progress

Tip #2: Keep Your Students’ Environment In Mind

When picking a theme, think about what is going to be relevant to your student. What is something your students can relate to or experience in their day-to-day lives? I like to pick themes about the seasons, the environment around my student, on-going classroom topics, etc.

Selecting themes that are personally relevant to my students helps build that connection between therapy and real life (can’t forget about that generalization!). A great theme for this summer would be the Summer Olympics, especially for those of you doing ESY.

Check out these 4 tips to help you pick a great theme for your caseload that can be adapted across all of your grade levels. Save hours of planning time by using themed therapy materials to cover your wide range of goals!

Tip #3: Pick A Theme That Inspires You Too

Check out these 4 tips to help you pick a great theme for your caseload that can be adapted across all of your grade levels. Save hours of planning time by using themed therapy materials to cover your wide range of goals!

The themes you pick should also be inspiring and exciting for you too! Of course, my students’ interests will always trump mine (#therapistlife). However, if you can find themes that are as interesting and motivating to you as they are to your students, then you’re going to kill that session! Your excitement will shine through and therapy will be really fun for you and your student.

For example, I love selecting camping themes because I love going camping and hiking and it’s also a theme that my students love. This makes our camping themed therapy sessions really, genuinely, fun!

Tip #4: Pick A Theme You Can Adapt Across Grades

Picking a theme that you can adapt across multiple grade levels is they key to save yourself planning time. For example, an apple theme is great for younger elementary students, older elementary students, and middle schoolers. This theme can also be adapted for my older student with higher needs or benefit from a very supported classroom. I found that many of my students with this profile had language skills similar to some of my elementary student. I was able to take the same concepts and adapt them with age-appropriate photos and materials that are respectful to those students. Here are some sample activity ideas using an apples theme across different age groups:

Check out these 4 tips to help you pick a great theme for your caseload that can be adapted across all of your grade levels. Save hours of planning time by using themed therapy materials to cover your wide range of goals!
Check out these 4 tips to help you pick a great theme for your caseload that can be adapted across all of your grade levels. Save hours of planning time by using themed therapy materials to cover your wide range of goals!

In A Theme Rut?

If you’re having a hard time picking the right themes for your students, check out my free Themed Therapy Planning Guide. It has over 100 seasonal and non-seasonal therapy theme ideas for you to choose from! This planning guide also comes with an editable lesson plan template you can use to help plan your themed therapy sessions. If you’re still having a tough time finding the right theme for your students, I would also recommend collaborating with other teachers. See what themes are being incorporated in your students’ classrooms that can also be incorporated and worked on in speech therapy! 

Check out these 4 tips to help you pick a great theme for your caseload that can be adapted across all of your grade levels. Save hours of planning time by using themed therapy materials to cover your wide range of goals!

Join The Themed Therapy SLP Membership!

If you’re loving themed therapy planning that can be adapted across grade level to save you hours of planning time, check out the Themed Therapy SLP Membership. With this membership you will receive new themed materials to use with your students every month! To kick-off this challenge, I will be hosting a 5-day theme organizational challenge on Facebook. Join now for a sneak peak into the membership, great organizational tips from other themester SLP’s, and fun giveaways! Click on the photos below to learn more.

Check out these 4 tips to help you pick a great theme for your caseload that can be adapted across all of your grade levels. Save hours of planning time by using themed therapy materials to cover your wide range of goals!
Check out these 4 tips to help you pick a great theme for your caseload that can be adapted across all of your grade levels. Save hours of planning time by using themed therapy materials to cover your wide range of goals!

This blog post is based on my recent Facebook live called, “What Makes a Great Theme for Your Caseload“. Make sure to check it out! 

10 Ways to Use a Pizza Toy Set in Speech

10 Ways to Use a Pizza Toy Set in Speech

Making time for play therapy in your lesson plan is a great way to have your student work on their language in a functional and engaging way. Kids love to play, and they also love pizza! Which makes these pizza toy sets a must-have tool for your speech therapy session. Use these pizza toy sets to target a variety of language and speech goals through play!

Where Can I Buy a Pizza Toy Set for Speech Therapy?

 

There are a few different pizza toy sets available online. All of the ones I’m suggesting below can be found on Amazon, but you might be able to find them at stores like Target, too. The links below are Amazon affiliate links for your convenience in which I receive a small commission when you click at no additional cost to you.

It can be fun to play pizza delivery or eating at a pizza restaurant with this Melissa and Doug Wooden Pizza Counter. If you want a felt version, there is this set for under $20. Working on pretending to go to a pizza party, you can grab this pizza party set HERE. For a more tactile pizza play activity, you can use the Playdoh pizza set.

 

Incorporate a pizza toy set into your speech therapy sessions to increase engagement and opportunities for meaningful practice on speech and language goals.

Play-Based Speech and Language Toy Companion Cheat Sheets

Need a cheat sheet guide to help you with targeting wh- questions, Tier II vocabulary, articulation, basic concepts, adjectives, and helpful therapy ideas for toys you use during play-based therapy? Grab this Toy Companion Cheat Sheet Guide for Prek-2nd grade and have stimulus targets mapped out for 25 different toys. 

You can save brain energy while effectively using toys to target your student’s speech or language goals. Use these cheat sheets so that you can have FUN in therapy too!

Incorporate a pizza toy set into your speech therapy sessions to increase engagement and opportunities for meaningful practice on speech and language goals.
 Incorporate a pizza toy set into your speech therapy sessions to increase engagement and opportunities for meaningful practice on speech and language goals.

Using a Pizza Toy Set in Play-Based Speech Therapy

Incorporate a pizza toy set into your speech therapy sessions to increase engagement and opportunities for meaningful practice on speech and language goals.

A pizza toy set can be used to target so many speech and language skills! Listed below are some of my favorite ways to engage children in these skills:

1. Use the pizza toppings and pieces to work on following directions and sequencing the steps to make a pizza.

2. Describe the ingredients and sort the items into category groups: appliances, utensils, food, meat, veggies, dairy, etc.

3. Put the pizza toppings on flashcards and students pick a topping. Then, have the student practice their target. Use silly sentences such as “The rabbit ate the pepperoni.”

4. Practice turn taking and perspective taking by having the child prepare a pizza for someone else. Work on initiation for questions and comments.

5. Have things go wrong while making the pizza by having it burn, dropping the pizza, running out of toppings, and expressing dislike such as yuck for toppings.

More Therapy Ideas Using a Cookie Toy Set

    6. Act out different verbs and vocabulary with gestures such as devour, smell, hot, chew, mix, etc.

    7. Talk about which pizzas have more/less/few/none.

    8. Discuss the social rules for going to a pizzeria.

    9. Use toppings for phonological awareness cues or tapping out multi-syllabic words.

    10. Have your students feed different items pizza. You can work on building sentences, answering “who” and “what” questions and turn taking.

    Incorporate a pizza toy set into your speech therapy sessions to increase engagement and opportunities for meaningful practice on speech and language goals.

    More Toys to Use in Play Therapy

    Incorporate a pizza toy set into your speech therapy sessions to increase engagement and opportunities for meaningful practice on speech and language goals.

    If you are loving all these toy ideas for play therapy, you can read more blog posts on some of my favorite toys to use in therapy.

    When I pull out a toy knowing the purpose of how I will use it to cover goals, I feel confident with my therapy choice. It’s okay to put the worksheets away if you are FUNctionally using toys to target speech and language goals.

    Your students will probably be more engaged with your lesson for the day!

    Check out my favorite toys and 10 ways to use them in therapy:

    Ice Cream Toy Set

    Toy Trains in Speech

    Using Play Food in Therapy

    Farmhouse Toy Set

    How Do You Use a Pizza Toy Set in Speech Therapy?

     

    Do you have a fun way to engage your students with a pizza toy set in speech therapy? Share in the comments, tag me on Instagram @thedabblingspeechie, or email me at feliceclark@thedabblingspeechie.com.

    The BEST Summer YouTube Videos for Speech Therapy

    The BEST Summer YouTube Videos for Speech Therapy

    Whether you are seeing your students in person, providing teletherapy, or doing a little bit of both, these are the best summer-themed youtube videos for your summer therapy plans. 

    When exploring summer fun, you can find reading passages about summer, weather concepts, going to the beach, ocean animals, and outdoor activities. Themed reading passages are a great way to work on tiered vocabulary, listening and reading comprehension, story grammar, sequencing, identifying the main idea, and recalling important details. Varying your supports and finding passages with your student’s speech sound are a plus! This will help you plan a great mixed group lesson for your students. 

    As always, www.readworks.org or www.getepic.com are great places to find books and passages for your summer theme. Summer videos are great companions to those passages or an alternative lesson plan to the reading passages all together. 

    You can use summer videos to help organize your therapy sessions with engaging content. In this blog post, I will be sharing some of my favorite summer videos for teletherapy.

    Summer YouTube Videos for Teletherapy

    You can kick-off your summer-themed lessons with this fun video about the sun and the seasons from Crash Course Kids. This video uses an engaging poem to help build background knowledge about seasons. With this video are 5 additional videos which you can break up over the course of an entire month to target vocabulary and language. These videos are great for a 20-30 minute session since they aren’t too lengthy.

    This Scishow kids video is great for learning about the importance of sunscreen!

    All the BEST Summer YouTube Videos for teletherapy so that you can stay organized with planning your sessions.

    Practice Social Skills Using Summer Videos

     

    These Simon’s cat summer videos are a fun way to target those nonverbal social skills with your students. I like to use these videos when we’re practicing facial expressions and body language. My student and I talk about how the animals are feeling in the videos. 

    If you want to see how you can use Simon’s Cat videos to target a variety of goals, check out this BLOG POST.

    I also like to use the animated videos when practicing inferences with my students. These are fun summer themed videos to practice this skill.

    Summer Videos Using YouTube Book Read Aloud Videos

    All the BEST Summer YouTube Videos for teletherapy so that you can stay organized with planning your sessions.

    Shared story book readings are a great home activity to support your students’ generalization of language concepts. Even though reading the actual book is preferred, sometimes my families don’t have access to a variety of themed books. Especially now with many libraries still closed. YouTube read alouds are a perfect alternative for students. They will still have access to the story, keep learning about summer, and increase their language building opportunities at home. 

    To make sure that it’s still a shared story reading, encourage families to keep the YouTube video on mute so that they can read the pages. I try to find book read alouds that show clear pages so that families can read the lines from the story. 

    This is a great home carryover activity, but it can also be a great therapy lesson. Pause the read aloud and talk about what your student sees on the page. I also like to ask my students what they think will come next or how this story goes along with our summer theme. 

    Other ways to use books are by screen sharing while projecting a book from Kindle Unlimited, Vooks, or using Epic. If you’re looking for some more summer books ideas, check out my list of books for targeting summer vocabulary.

    Get Up And Moving With Your Students

    It’s summer and the perfect time to go outside and get moving! Use these fun, summer-themed songs to have a movement break with your students during your sessions. These songs are great to use for your whole group lessons as a warm-up or when you can see your kids are struggling to pay attention. 

    Use these songs and videos to target seasons, summer vocabulary, and basic concepts in a way that’s fun and engaging for your students. I like to also have my younger students work on requesting and imitation with these movement breaks. 

    Don’t forget to check out the Frozen song video (who doesn’t love Olaf?). Share in the comments what songs you like to use with your students. 

    If  you want all these summer songs in one place as well as more of my faves, grab this free summer YouTube Google Slides by clicking the pink button.

    Use Google Slides to Organize Your Summer Videos

    All the BEST Summer YouTube Videos for teletherapy so that you can stay organized with planning your sessions.

    One way you can keep all your favorite videos organized is by adding them to a Google Slide or PowerPoint. I find that adding them to Google Slides is easier for sharing with educators or families. Once you add in all the video links, you can easily navigate to the ones you need for the lesson.

    Once you have it organized, you can use it year after year with your groups. If you need all of these videos in an organized Google Slides presentation, grab my summer-themed language lesson plan guides that have a Google Slides™ presentation included. It comes with everything ready to go.

    You can see how you can organize your videos and activities in the video below.

    What summer videos have you found and included in your summer lessons? I would love to add them to my collection of materials! Share in the comments.

    Plant Life Cycle Activities for Language Therapy

    Plant Life Cycle Activities for Language Therapy

    During the spring and summer months an easy theme you can use to cover goals for your younger and older students is the plant life cycle.

    When I was working with K-8 students, I would try and think of themes or activities that could be adapted for both age groups because it made easier for me to plan and not feel like my brain was constantly shifting gears when it came to teaching content.

    Today, I am going to share resources and activities you can do to teach language using the plant life cycle. 

    Planting Sensory Bin for Younger Students

    Plant life cycle can be taught using a flower garden sensory bin in speech therapy

    Our younger students learn best from exploring and what better way to work on a plant life cycle then with a planting sensory bin.

    All you need is a sensory bin filler (i.e., black beans, or real dirt), fake flowers from the Dollar Store or flower Toobs, a shovel, mini watering can, and mini pots for planting the flowers. If you need more spring sensory bin ideas, you can check out this blog HERE.

    For SLPs that LOVE sensory bins and enjoy doing a flower theme, you can use this flower sensory bin companion to cover all your goals during play therapy. 

     

    Books that Teach the Plant Life Cycle

    Another great way to discuss the plant life cycle is through books. This can be a great resource to help work on wh-questions, describing, and building vocabulary in the context of the book. Here are some book recommendations that would help you teach the plant life cycle (Amazon Affiliate links include):

    The Tiny Seed by Eric Carle

    Plant the Tiny Seed by Greenwillow Books

    From Seed to Plant by Gail Gibbons

    The Amazing Life Cycle of Plants by Kay Barnham 

    Videos to Teach Plant Life Cycle’s and Vocabulary

    There are a lot of great videos that walk through the plant life cycle for children. What can be great about using videos is that it can visually show students the process. When kids can see it in a video, they will be more likely to stay engaged.

    Scishowkids has a great video for discussing the parts of a flower, which has some great tier II vocabulary words to work on such as support, stiff, study, separate, nutrients, collect, healthy, or spread.

    You can also have students work on explaining the process for how a seed becomes a plant. Particularly, you can give your students transition words to use to help connect their ideas while explaining the plant life cycle. 

    Here are a couple of songs to use with younger students to explain the plant life cycle. If you search “plant life cycle songs” on YouTube, you will find more options!

    Plant Life Cycle YouTube Videos to use with older students in speech therapy.

    Even More YouTube Videos for Discussing the Plant Life Cycle

    Fun Science Demos on YouTube has some good videos that visually show where you can find seeds on a plant. I don’t know about you, but I love watching videos with real people using real-life examples. It helps me to understand the content a lot more thoroughly. You can use these videos to discuss main idea and details as well as answering wh-questions. You could also practice using conjunctions and transition words while summarizing the video. 

    YouTube Videos About Plants for Older Students

    Plant life cycle activities and resources to help teach language skills in speech therapy

    Ted-Ed has a lot of great videos that discuss cool science about how plants grow. These videos more friendly for the older student and you won’t get accused for bringing in kiddie materials. In addition, using plant videos aligns with the science standards for life sciences. Here are a couple of videos I thought middle schoolers would like.

    Curriculum to Teach Plant Life Cycle in Language Therapy

    Have you ever heard of Mystery Science? It has easy to follow videos that answer a question about a science mystery. Often times, the videos also come with a hands on science experiment. What I love the most about Mystery Science is that it even has videos for each of the steps for completing the project, so it helps our students with receptive language challenges follow directions easier. This could be a great resource for using in your small groups to work on tier II vocabulary, syntax, wh-questions, working together in a group, and summarizing. Furthermore, this could be your next collaborative co-teaching activity for a general education classroom. I am sure you could offer to help with a science lesson in your student’s class and co-teach with the student’s teacher. If you are wondering how to co-teach, here is a blog post breaking down collaborative services.

    Mystery Science has two great plant series that can last you up to 2 months of therapy. There is the Power of Flowers series that has four lessons and Plant Adaptations that includes five lessons.

    Plant Life Cycle Craft Ideas

    Use a fun craft to teach the plant life cycle to help students stay engaged while they learn.

    Students really do love making crafts. It can be a great way for them to process the information you are sharing with them. When I do choose to do a craft, I want it to be functional for their goals and the concepts that we are doing. You could do this plant life cycle unit for 2-3 weeks and on the last week, allow your students to craft a flower life cycle craft. If you have a lot of mixed groups, there are templates for different sounds and language targets, so everything is working on their goals.

    I also saw a fun craft using two paper plates. You can draw the plant life cycle on one plate and then cut a triangle out of the other plate. Attach the two plates with mini brass paper fasteners. Your students can rotate the plate to share the steps of the plant life cycle.

    What Activities and Resources Do You Use for Teaching the Plant Life Cycle?

    What resources, crafts, books, or activities do you use to teach the plant life cycle? Share in the comments because I am always on the hunt for more relevant resources.

    Sound Activities for Kids to Use in Push-In Therapy

    Sound Activities for Kids to Use in Push-In Therapy

    For the month of March, my special day class teachers are using sound and light as their theme for language arts. We use the Unique Curriculum every month and the month of March has sound activities for kids. Using the Unique Curriculum helps the teacher and I plan push-in lessons because it includes stories and modified activities, so you can easily differentiate for the students academic and communication needs. Today, I wanted to show you how you can create your own sound activities for kids that can be used in small groups and whole-class instruction.

    Amazon affiliate links are included in this blog post for your convenience. When you click on a link and purchase an item, I get a small commission without any cost to you. 

    Planning for the Sound Speech Therapy Lesson

    The Push-In set up for my self contained K-1 and 1-2 classrooms are to teach a whole class lesson using literacy and discussing the theme of the week with visuals and a Google Slide presentation. We do this for about 20 minutes. Then, we break up into small group stations that I and the teachers run for about 10 minutes in length.

    This allows the students to engage in different language topics at three different stations, which makes for more meaningful practice. This also helps get your students academic ready meaning they are learning to stay seated in a chair, transition to new activities and practicing the correct voice volume at a station table. For those of you feeling overwhelmed with managing behaviors in small groups and whole class, head to this blog post. It has a lot of helpful tips!

    If you need visual supports to help teach behavior expectations and rules, these visuals will help increase positive behaviors with less verbal reminders. 

    For more information about how to setup push-in lessons for your students, check out this blog post. If you are wondering about

    Here are some great sound activities for kids that you can use in your small group and push-in lessons as a speech therapist. Want to have activities that support your Unique curriculum? Check out this blog post to get sound activities to teach science, vocabulary and descriptive language.

    YouTube Videos of Sound Activity for Kids to Use for Whole Class or Small Group Instruction

    Here are some great sound activities for kids that you can use in your small group and push-in lessons as a speech therapist. Want to have activities that support your Unique curriculum? Check out this blog post to get sound activities to teach science, vocabulary and descriptive language.

    On YouTube, there are two really great videos to work on identifying noises and sounds. You can have your students ‘guess’ what is making the sound. And, after the guess is revealed, you can work on answering ‘Where’ you would hear that sound or ‘Who’ makes that sound. Use visual sentence frames to have students explain who makes the sound such as, “The cow makes a ‘moo’ sound. You can also have students identify if the sound is quiet or loud.

    One thing I recommend using is a software called SafeTube. It allows you to copy and paste the YouTube video link and creates a safe link to view the video. This way you aren’t getting inappropriate ads or popups that are not appropriate for students to view.

    The animal sounds game is perfect for your younger students.  The “Guess the Sound” YouTube video has a variety of sounds in the environment and would be best for younger and older students. 

    Books About Sound to Use for Speech Therapy

    You can use a book to introduce the topic of sounds as a whole class or use the book during one of the station rotations. As a whole class, we used the story from the Unique Curriculum. It is great on a SMARTboard because you can tap the page and it will read it out-loud to the students while highlighting each word. If you do not have this N2Y subscription, I listed some books you can use. Check out the Station 3 book too. My students loved it! You can still get it on Amazon even though it appears that Usborne does not sell “Who’s Making That Noise?”

    Here are some other books you can use in therapy that talk about sounds:

    Sounds All Around by Wendy Pfeffer

    Sound: Loud, Soft, High, and Low (Amazing Science) by Natalie Myra Rosinsky

    Encyclopedia Britannica Kids – Animal Sound Treasury Book – PI Kids (Play-A-Sound) by Phoenix International Publications

    Mr. Brown Can Moo, Can You? By Dr. Seuss

    We’re Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen

    Here are some great sound activities for kids that you can use in your small group and push-in lessons as a speech therapist. Want to have activities that support your Unique curriculum? Check out this blog post to get sound activities to teach science, vocabulary and descriptive language.

    Sound Activity for Station 1 Rotation

     

    The special education teacher had these tin canisters from the Dollar Tree and filled them with different items that make noise. Each of the students took a turn shaking one of the containers. They listened to the sound and made a guess about what the sound could be. Your students can also describe the sound as either quiet or loud with this activity. The students were very engaged and excited to find out what was in the containers. You can work on CORE vocabulary for “open”, “more,” “like/don’t like”, “loud” and “quiet.” You can also find them on Amazon HERE.

    Here are some great sound activities for kids that you can use in your small group and push-in lessons as a speech therapist. Want to have activities that support your Unique curriculum? Check out this blog post to get sound activities to teach science, vocabulary and descriptive language.
    Here are some great sound activities for kids that you can use in your small group and push-in lessons as a speech therapist. Want to have activities that support your Unique curriculum? Check out this blog post to get sound activities to teach science, vocabulary and descriptive language.

    Sound Activity for Station 2 Rotation

    For another station, you could use one of the ‘Guess the Sound’ YouTube videos and work in a small group. Or, you can do a sound charades game where students take turns imitating the sounds/noises of different items, nature, appliances, and animals. While you are making the sounds, you can cover yes/no questions by asking, “Is this sound quiet?” or “Is this a lion?”

    Grab this activity by clicking the pink button. It is a free download to use in your therapy room.

    Sound Activity for Station 3 Rotation

     

    Grab a good book that talks about sound. I really love the Usborne Lift a Flap Book for “Who’s Making that Noise?” by Jenny Tyler and Philip Hawthorn. I don’t think Usbourne sells this series anymore. But, the kids loved talking about the noises the animals were making. It was perfect for open/close, answering “what”, “where”, and “who” questions as well as teaching the CORE vocabulary of “no/not.” This book has repetitive lines and one of them is “Who’s making that noise? Is it those noisy boys? It’s NOT us.”

    Here are some great sound activities for kids that you can use in your small group and push-in lessons as a speech therapist. Want to have activities that support your Unique curriculum? Check out this blog post to get sound activities to teach science, vocabulary and descriptive language.

    Grab this free sound charade visual activity with visual sentence starters. I love using visual sentence frames to help my students generate more novel utterances. If you are an elementary SLP and tired of scribbling out sentence frames on post-it notes, then grab my entire visual sentence starters to use with ANY lesson and with a variety of goals.

    What Sound Activities for Kids Do You Love to Use?

    Working on identifying sounds in your speech sessions can be really engaging because your students use their hearing to navigate the world around them. When we find themes that are relevant to our students’ environment, they tend to have more to say about the topic. The staff and myself noticed a lot more comments and initiation of communication with this theme. What sound activities or materials have you used with your students? Let me know in the comments. 

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