Managing your caseload IS overwhelming. Especially, if your caseload is over 65. SLP caseload organization is seriously a process–lol! Some of you SLPs have caseloads that I am sure 4 speech pathologists could be managing. That is crazy to me.

SLP caseload organization tips for what to do those first weeks back at work. FREE IEP calendar and a checklist to help you manage overwhelming tasks as a speech therapist. #slpeeps #slporganization #schoolslp #speechtherapy #dabblingslp #slp #speechies #speechtherapy

The Struggles I Faced With SLP Caseload Organization

About 6-7 years ago, I was managing two schools, with a very transient population. Kids were coming and going every month. I had, on average, 75-83 students on my caseload at any given time. In addition to this, I served two Mod-Severe Special Day Classrooms with students on the Autism spectrum. I also served a mild-mod Special Day Classroom for grades 3-5. It was too much for me to healthily manage. But at the time, I was stuck managing this caseload until something or someone stepped in to lighten my workload. During those few years, I learned ways to manage my caseload as best I could. It wasn’t always pretty and it definitely wasn’t perfect. You will probably hate me for writing this, but I am going to put it out there.

What I Learned From Managing A High Caseload

I struggled, and continue to struggle, with keeping my schedule organized, staying up to date with medicaid billing, managing incoming referrals, communicating with staff and parents, lesson planning and making sure to log my therapy notes. It is something that I do well with during certain times of the year and something that is a struggle when I have 10 or more IEPs in a month.

SLP caseload organization tips for what to do those first weeks back at work. FREE IEP calendar and a checklist to help you manage overwhelming tasks as a speech therapist. #slpeeps #slporganization #schoolslp #speechtherapy #dabblingslp #slp #speechies #speechtherapy

Once I had a more manageable caseload of 48-57, I realized how many organizational strategies I had learned and implemented with my large caseload. With my large caseload, I had developed systems to help me do things quicker and more efficiently. I talked with my SLP colleagues to see how they were doing things. I figured out what was going to give me the most organization for the least amount of upkeep.

SLP Caseload Organization Does Get Easier

Organizing my smaller caseload was much less overwhelming because by that time, I had 7 years in the field under my belt. And, I knew what systems worked for me. Let me just say, having a smaller caseload, doesn’t always make the caseload management piece less overwhelming. I was still overwhelmed those first few months back! Especially, whenever I transitioned to a new school assignment. I felt brand new all over again. Within a few months, my brain was no longer on fire from trying to remember everything. You know what I mean…..remembering staff member names, student names, passwords, copier codes, students goals, your schedule, lesson plans, etc.

So if you are new to the schools or just have a rough transition to the start of the year, I wanted to share some systems and forms that may help you with your SLP caseload organization.

What should I expect to do that first week back?

  1. Show up – lol! You will probably go to professional development on the first and second days back at work. The professional development will be a lot of information. If you find your brain wandering, start writing down a list of things you want to go back to when you get time. 
  2. Get all the things – check out your computer, get your keys, check out an Ipad, copier codes, etc. If you are new to a site, I introduce myself to staff. I make a point to meet new teachers that I will be working with for the year.
  3. Make sure everything works – check your passwords and print out something you need, like your caseload. If technology isn’t working, this is when you can submit IT ticket support. It is a pain, but better to get it fixed now.

Meet With Your SPED Staff

  1. Start scheduling for the year – Those that are new to a site, find out from your IEP team how you need to schedule IEPs. I recommend getting staff together and scheduling IEPs for the year. Things will change during the year, but it is nice knowing a rough outline. If your team doesn’t schedule out the whole year, I would recommend scheduling all your IEPs that you are the case manager. Typically, I do at least 3 months out, so I can plan “To Do” tasks accordingly each week.
  2. Get comfortable with processes at your site – If you are brand new to your site, I recommend learning about the Student Study Team (SST) or general ed Response To Intervention (RTI)  process at your site. This is the time to make yourself a GUIDE for how staff will refer students to you all year. Check out my speech referral process HERE (it has links & tips for making an organizational binder).

SLP caseload organization tips for what to do those first weeks back at work. FREE IEP calendar and a checklist to help you manage overwhelming tasks as a speech therapist. #slpeeps #slporganization #schoolslp #speechtherapy #dabblingslp #slp #speechies #speechtherapy

Here is a checklist of what SLPs should do the first week back

Having a checklist of responsibilities helps reduce anxiety when trying to manage your caseload. There are a lot of things that need to be set up before you see kids. Make a list or ask an SLP for their list to help you feel less overwhelmed. Here are some things on my checklist:

  1. Organize the therapy/data binder. Review goals and services for your students. I put all of this information on my therapy log forms using SLPtoolkit. You can read my blog post on this caseload management system HERE
  2. Once school starts, review your caseload on SEIS and verify students attending your schools. Put in requests to remove students from your caseload that are not attending your school. Put in requests to add students that transferred in that are not on your caseload.
  3. For any new students who do not have a working file, contact the SLP from his or her previous school or put in a records request to obtain information.

SLP caseload organization tips for what to do those first weeks back at work. FREE IEP calendar and a checklist to help you manage overwhelming tasks as a speech therapist. #slpeeps #slporganization #schoolslp #speechtherapy #dabblingslp #slp #speechies #speechtherapy

  1. Review IEPs of students. Document accommodations/modifications, services and goals. Communicate services and accommodations with the classroom teachers.
  2. Make your speech schedule. This may take A LOT of drafts, but it will get made, I promise!
    1. Verify your student’s attendance and make note of his classroom teacher.
    2. Collect all schedules you may need: PE schedule, RSP schedule, OT schedule, Bell Schedule (need lunch and recess times), ELD schedule, Music schedule and Intervention Schedule
    3. Create a draft speech schedule and send out to teachers. Make changes as you get feedback from staff.

More “To Do” Tasks for The Start of the Year

  1. Print and put contact logs for each student in your therapy binder or in their folders. During the year, you will have easy access to the log when contacting parents. I use contact logs from The Speech Bubble SLP. 
  2. Organize your IEP calendar by figuring out your annuals and tri’s for the year. You can print your caseload from your IEP database and put them in your calendar or on an IEP monthly tracking form. HERE is a google sheet I created to keep track. You can keep digitally or fill out for your caseload, and print. Then, you can manually check off what you need to do if you are more a paper/pencil SLP. Schedule out IEPs at least 3 months out or for the whole year.
  3. Set up your behavior management system. Prep any forms, sticker charts, rules, etc. for your speech room.
  4. Contact students’ parents. Check in with them and introduce yourself. A letter of introduction is recommended. Review it with your Principal prior to sending home. There is a link to a FREE letter below.
  5. Set up your medicaid billing system with your students, so you can easily bill during the year.
  6. Print parent rights copies for IEP meetings and store in a file folder.
  7. Put any monthly staff meetings or Professional Learning Community meetings on your calendar.
  8. Inventory materials and assessment tools (if you have time).

HERE is a checklist of all these things you need to do those first weeks back.

Facebook LIVE Tips for SLP Caseload Management Those First Weeks Back

Watch my Facebook LIVE replay to see what I do my first weeks back if you are more of an auditory/visual learner.

Helpful SLP Caseload Organization Forms

SLP caseload organization tips for what to do those first weeks back at work. FREE IEP calendar and a checklist to help you manage overwhelming tasks as a speech therapist. #slpeeps #slporganization #schoolslp #speechtherapy #dabblingslp #slp #speechies #speechtherapy

Need lesson plan templates for sensory bins, push-in language lessons, themed lessons, social skills or weekly lessons? Click the button below to get your FREE lesson plan guides.

Google Sheets for SLPs from Speechy MusingsWeekly Editable Data Sheets for SLPs – FREE printable from SLP Natalie Snyders

Google Forms For Speech Referrals – FREE from me

The SLP Starter Kit – FREE from Sublime Speech

SLP Editable Letter of Introduction to Parents Template – Free by SLP Natalie Snyders

SLP Attendance Form for 18-19 – FREE by SLP Natalie Snyders

What SLP Caseload Organization Tips Do You Have?

There you have it! That is what you need to do to be successful with organizing your caseload. If you take the list of “to dos” and take on one task at a time, you will get through. How do you make setting up your caseload at the beginning of the year work? Your tips may help an SLP feel less frazzled at the start of the year. Share your expertise in the comments!

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