EP. 85 Epic Mom Fail Turns Teachable SLP Moment

Hey Hey Hey SLPs! Today guys, I have an epic mom fail turn teachable SLP moment. I think you’re going to get a chuckle. I know right now you are probably tired, you’re not laughing, you are just like, when’s the paperwork going to end? So, I hope you get a kick out of today’s episode as I share a tale from my life to make you a better SLP. 

 

 

In this episode you’ll hear:

 

  • Always double check your reports
  • Preview all YouTube videos before showing students
  • Know the student LINGO before using it in therapy
  • Vet those song lyrics lol

 

 

Have a craft for Better Speech and Hearing month that you can use in therapy groups, as a bulletin board, or to send home as home practice.

Mouth Craftivity for Better Speech and Hearing Month

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Ep. 84 Five Things I Have Learned from My Autistic Students

Hey Hey Hey SLPs! Today I am talking about things that I have learned from my autistic students. It’s Autism Acceptance Month and I wanted to share some reflections that I have had with working alongside my Autistic students.Many of the lessons I have learned has helped me serve all my students better, but I wanted to highlight specifically what I have learned from supporting the Autistic community.
In this episode you’ll hear:

 

  • Functional communication is more important than academic skills. 
  • Share what they can do with the team rather than always focusing on what they can’t do. 
  • It takes a team to support Autistic students well, so involve them!
  • Incorporate their passions and interests into your sessions
  • Just because they didn’t like a toy or activity doesn’t mean you can’t re-introduce it in future sessions. (doggy house, heavy work)
Free DownloadChicken Language Lesson Plan Guides

 

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How To Store Sensory Bins For the Year

How To Store Sensory Bins For the Year

You are probably reading this blog post because you LOVE using sensory bins so much that now you are running out of room to store them.

When I first started using sensory bins, I would shove the materials into a gallon-sized bag and toss them into a big container. The only problem was that when I wanted to use a particular sensory bin the following year, it took me twenty minutes to find it!

Does this sound familiar? Hopefully, after reading this blog post, you will have a system for organizing your sensory bins for the school year. Amazon affiliate links are included in this blog post. 

Biggest Space-Saver Tip for Storing Sensory Bins

Check out these tips for how to store sensory bins for the school year, so that you know where your speech therapy materials are located when you need them. Streamline your sensory bin organization today!

Most of us have small therapy rooms; it’s an unfortunate reality. So, our therapy rooms can get pretty cluttered with stuff if we aren’t managing our organization of speech therapy materials.

To save space and money, invest in no more than three sensory bin containers. You can get a smaller pencil box, a shallow Sterilite bin, and then a quart-sized bin to hold your sensory bin materials.

Then, you can keep the sensory bins you aren’t using in larger containers and store them in your room or your garage. When working two days a week at two different schools, I kept my additional sensory bins in my garage and brought the one container between sites.

Materials Needed to Create Your Sensory Bin Organization System

Using zipper pouches is an excellent investment to keep the filler and material items together in one spot. You can get different sizes for storage. Depending on the number of things in your sensory bin, you may want more oversized bags sized 16 by 12 inches or 15 by 11 inches. You can then purchase smaller-sized zipper pouches to store mini items and printables for the bin.

Having labels to put on the pouches will also help you identify the materials you want to use.

Then, you can sort your sensory bin bags into categories for when you typically use them throughout the school year. When you label your larger containers by times of the year, you will know which bin to go to look for items.

Check out these tips for how to store sensory bins for the school year, so that you know where your speech therapy materials are located when you need them. Streamline your sensory bin organization today!

Check out how to organize the zipper pouches

Check out these tips for how to store sensory bins for the school year, so that you know where your speech therapy materials are located when you need them. Streamline your sensory bin organization today!

My organizational style likes everything in one spot if I can help it. So, when organizing my apple tree sensory bin, I stored the toilet paper rolls and fake apples in the larger pouch (16 by 12 inches) and then kept the filler Pom Pom balls in the slightly smaller folder (15 by 11 inches.) I put those in the smaller zipper pouch for the apple-themed verb and vocabulary printables. Then, I tossed them all into the bigger zipper pouch.

Suppose you are interested in getting themed sensory bin materials. In that case, you can check out companions in my TPT store or have themed sensory bin guides with the Themed Therapy SLP Membership (doors open in summer 2022, so get on the waitlist now.)

Sensory Bin Sticker Labels

Having a label on the zipper pouch is super helpful when you want to identify sensory bin sets in your larger bins. You can create labels for your different containers and print them out on a full-page Avery shipping label. Cut them out and stick them on the zipper pouch.

After adding all your materials to your zipper pouch with the label intact, you plop it into the more oversized organization container! Your sensory bin is now appropriately stored for the season, lol.

When you need the materials for a sensory bin, you grab them out of the tote and dump them in your main sensory bin container.

Sensory Bins Your Students Will LOVE

When it comes to making sensory bins, you definitely can use items from around your speech room. But if you are looking for themed sensory bins that have cheat sheets, visual supports, and printables ready to go, check out these sensory bin resources in my TPT store

What sensory bin organization tips do you have to share?

If you have any tremendous sensory bin organization tips, please share them! One of my favorite ways to use sensory bins is with a themed book. You can read the story and then pair a sensory bin that reinforces the concepts from the books in a hands-on way for your students.

For more sensory bin ideas on how you can make your bins, check out this blog post HERE

Low Prep Articulation Craft for Speech Therapy

Low Prep Articulation Craft for Speech Therapy

When your students start to whine about practicing their speech sounds, it usually means you need to change things up in your speech sessions.

We know that getting high trials with our students working on speech sounds is essential for making progress.

But it can be hard to find ways to make it FUNctional, right?

Today, you will learn how to make an articulation craft for speech therapy that will increase trials and become a therapy tool for your sessions!

Craft Supplies You Need to Make This Speech Challenge Craft

You need two paper plates for this craft (use the thin white ones), a glue stick, scissors, markers, and a word list with your student’s speech sounds.

If your students struggle with reading words, you can print out sheets of pictures with their speech sounds. You can use the Any Craft Companion to cover many speech and language goals.

For the word lists, I use the articulation flipbooks as they have word and picture-word lists. You can get the printable version HERE or the NO PRINT version HERE.

Have a low prep articulation craft for speech therapy that makes getting high trials easy!

How to Make the Articulation Craft for Speech Therapy

First, you will cut slits around one of the paper plates. The plate with the slits will be your top plate.

You will have your students write or glue their speech words around the plate with the bottom plate.

Then, put glue in the middle of the bottom plate. Attach the top plate with the slits to the glue on the base plate.

Your students can then flip the slits to reveal their speech words.

Make articulation speech therapy activities FUN with this low prep articulation craft that will get high trials!

How to Use the Articulation Craft in Speech Therapy Sessions

Once your students make their flip-flap speech challenge craft, set a timer for one minute and see how many words they can practice in a minute.

Use the craft as a warm-up each session to review speech sound practice or see if they can beat their previous score.

Instead of writing their speech words on the bottom plate, write different numbers around the plate. Then, write or glue their words on the top flaps. Whatever number you wrote behind the word is the number of times your students must practice their speech words.

Don’t worry about prepping homework because this articulation craft can be sent home as a home program activity for each day!

Need More Ideas for How To Adapt This Craft for Language Goals?

Would you love to use this articulation craft in your mixed groups? Check out this blog post for how you can use this idea with grammar targets! You could also do this with categories. What other goals could you do this speech therapy craft? Let me know in the comments. 

Use this easy to prep articulation craft for your speech therapy sessions. Help students stay motivated while they practice their speech sounds.

Ep. 83 How to Get Started with Myofunctional Therapy

 Hey Hey Hey SLPs! Today I am talking about Myofunctional Therapy. I invited Danni from Speech Goods to come on the show and give us the ‘goods’ about this type of therapy and how she uses it in her private practice. 

 

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • What myofunctional therapy is.
  • How you can get started with myofunctional therapy
  • Tips for SLPs that would love to start treating children with orofacial myofunctional disorders.
Blog Posts and Resources Mentioned:

 

Speech Goods Podcast Episode – 

What is myofunctional therapy? YouTube Video

 

What is Myofunctional Therapy with Danni Augustine

Episode 29: The What, When, and How of My Myofunctional Therapy with Danni Augustine by SpeechGoods

 

Oral MyoFunctional Facebook Group

 

 

 

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Spring Crafts for Speech Therapy

Spring Crafts for Speech Therapy

Need some spring craft ideas for your speech therapy sessions? Pairing a craft with one of your favorite spring books can help your students connect with the concepts from the book and increase engagement while practicing skills during the craft activity.

There are several ways that you can use crafts in your therapy session to make the prep work worth it! I will be sharing some easy craft options that are quick prep time. Check out this Real Talk SLP podcast episode to hear more about how you can use craft in your therapy sessions!

Amazon affiliate links included for your convenience.

Supplies You Need for These Spring Speech Therapy Crafts

Flower Crafts for Speech Therapy

During the spring months, flowers start to bloom, and there are a LOT of books about flowers. Two of my favorites for the early elementary crowd are “The Tiny Seed” by Eric Carle and “Planting a Rainbow” by Lois Ehlert.

If you have mixed groups and want to have ONE craft to cover all the goals, check out the Grow a Flower craft that provides different templates for speech and language goals. Specifically, if you want to work on sequencing how a flower grows, this craft is perfect because it has a template talking about the steps with visuals.

Planning a life cycle-themed unit can make themed therapy planning for younger and older students. Check out this blog post with ideas for your elementary speech therapy caseload.

More Low Prep Flower Craft Ideas

One of the easiest crafts to do is printing a spring flower and decorating it with colorful tissue paper squares. It is great for fine motor and makes things easier on you! If you need spring templates for crafts, check out the spring co-teaching language lesson plan guides that include a CORE board to pair with the craft.
Easy spring crafts for speech therapy that will increase engagement in your sessions!
Making crafts with paper plates is cost-effective and fun! If you need visual supports for the step-by-step process when making this flower paper plate craft, that’s a resource included in the Themed Therapy SLP membership. Get on the waitlist for when it opens up in summer 2022. What you will love about paper plate crafts is that you can glue targets on the back of the plate! Use this any craft companion to have targets for these types of crafts.

Spring Crafts to Pair with Your Favorite Books

Pairing insect-themed books with crafts in April is the perfect mash-up. Some of my favorite insect books have great craft activities. For example, the book “In the Tall, Tall Grass” by Denise Fleming pairs perfectly with this grass craft. You only need green construction paper, scissors, glue, and the free printables linked in this blog post!
If you love the books “The Very Lazy Ladybug” by Isobel Finn or The Very Hungry Ladybug by Eric Carle, you can make a paper plate ladybug! The visual story maps for “The Grouchy Ladybug” are included in the insect-themed unit when you join the Themed Therapy SLP membership (it’s opening up again in summer 2022.)

Caterpillar and Butterfly Crafts

There is no shortage of butterfly craft ideas on Pinterest to pair with the book, The Very Hungry Caterpillar. A few years ago, in my co-teaching session, we made this fun sponge caterpillar craft to create the main character from the story. You can check out more ideas for this book HERE.
Use fun insect crafts for your next spring themed speech therapy session!

What Crafts Do You Love to Use During the Spring Months?

Easy spring crafts for speech therapy that will make lesson planning easier!
When it comes to crafts, what are your faves for spring? Do you have a favorite book you like to pair the craft with your lessons? I would love it if you shared your book and craft pairings to help inspire other SLPs in planning their sessions.

Ep. 82 3 Ways to use Crafts in Your Therapy Session

Hey Hey Hey SLPs! Today I am talking about three ways you can use crafts in your therapy sessions. Whether you love or hate doing crafts, this episode is for you! Listen in to see if any of these ideas help motivate you to see if your students could benefit from getting crafty in your sessions!

 

 

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Ways to repurpose crafts used in your therapy session
  • Tips to help your students understand a concept from a book or from a theme 
  • How to use crafts as a progress monitoring tool

 

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Ep. 81 Play Themes for Spring

Hey Hey Hey SLPs! Today we’re going to be talking about play themes that you can do during the spring months. Now, if you love bringing toys into your session, implementing a play-based approach, as well as implementing themes with your caseload, you’re really going to get inspired with this episode!

 

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • How bringing toys into the session can increase engagement.
  • Ways that play themes can be effective in building motivation, connection and target a lot of different goals at one time. 
  • Target basic concepts like social and pragmatic conversation

Blog Posts and Resources Mentioned:

 

Free Bubbles Toy Companion Cheat Sheet

 

Have all the targets you need for speech and language goals while playing with bubbles. Say goodbye to brain fog and go into your play therapy sessions feeling more confident with following the child’s lead.

 

Spring Play Themes

Plant Life Cycle

 

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Cause and Effect Toys For Play Therapy

Cause and Effect Toys For Play Therapy

Cause and effect toys teach children that their actions can cause something to happen. When a child blows in a bubble wand, bubbles fly out; when a child pushes a car into a tower of blocks, it falls.

Using cause and effect toys in speech therapy can help your students build language. Still, it can also increase attention span, create curiosity, and improve joint attention skills. Today, I am going to share some of my favorite cause and effect toys you can use to help increase engagement while also working on speech and language goals!

What Toys Do You Have In Your Therapy Stash?

Some of the BEST cause and effect toys are the ones that you already have in your speech therapy material stash. A set of blocks and anything to knock them down work wonders! Amazon affiliate links are included for your convenience.

I found these wooden blocks at the Dollar tree and grabbed some of my cars. While stacking the blocks, you can work on “up, more, exclamations (i.e., oh, yay) and stack.”

Stacking cups, blocks, or boxes are also versatile for teaching tall/short, hiding things under, and using pretend play bowls. This set from Brilliant Basics Stack and Roll Cups is under $10 and can be stacked or put together as a ball to roll.

For a set of stacking boxes, Melissa and Doug have a set under $15, but these Babies Dinosaur Stacking Blocks have openings to put dinosaurs. You work on stacking, up/down, and in/out.

Cause and effect toys can improve language, executive functioning, and joint attention. Not to mention using cause and effect toys are super fun for children.

Play Therapy Cheat Sheets

Check out the toy companion cheat sheets if you serve students with various goals and want to start using ONE toy to cover many target areas. There are toy companions for stacking cups, cars, and over 30 types of toys and games (new toy companion cheat sheets are added to the resource as you send in requests.)

Cause and Effect Toys That Provide a Surprise

Toys that have a surprise are great for improving joint attention. Kids love the anticipation of finding what’s inside. You can also be super animated with your facial expressions to share in the “surprise” and excitement.

For SLPs on a budget, grabbing some plastic eggs at the Dollar Tree or Walmart during the Easter holiday is excellent for hiding mini items or pictures inside. You can read here are you can use those eggs with a chicken theme.

You also can use plastic cups to hide items underneath. If you are looking for things to add to a sensory bin, check out the toys from Learning Resources. The Surprise Party presents are great for a birthday theme. They also have other versions, such as acornspicnic baskets, or farm animals.

Need a toy companion for these surprise party boxes? They are included in the toy companion cheat sheet guides!

Toys that Encourage Children to Request More of an Action

Cause and effect toys can improve language, executive functioning, and joint attention. Not to mention using cause and effect toys are super fun for children.

When you use cause and effect toys that spark your student’s curiosity to want to do it again, you have some golden opportunities to work on communication!

And, if they need the item or help from you to watch that action happen, you can work on functional communication such as help, want, go, more, or gestures to signal to make that action happen again.

My two favorite toys for sparking some curiosity are ball poppers and wind-up toys (part of the toy companion cheat sheets.)

You can work on using verbal routines (i.e., ready, set, go), target CORE vocabulary (i.e., go, again, more, turn), turn-taking, joint attention, and social communication (i.e., funny, help me.)

What are Your Favorite Toys to Work on Cause and Effect?

What toys do you use to work on cause and effect in speech therapy? Your recommendations for toys are always the best. Share in the comments so other SLPs can find toys that will help plan their next speech therapy session.

If you need more toy and play therapy ideas, you can always search “toys” in the search bar or check out blog posts HERE

Cause and effect toys can improve language, executive functioning, and joint attention. Not to mention using cause and effect toys are super fun for children.

Ep. 80 The Benefits of Play Therapy

Hey Hey Hey SLPs! Today I am talking with Sydney from The Listening SLP. We are going to be chatting about tips for play therapy. Sydney is always super practical and gives many strategies to build confidence during your therapy sessions. 

 

 

 

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Benefits for implementing a play-based approach in therapy
  • Types of strategies to help a child work on their targeted speech or language goals
  • Tips for planning a structured play therapy session

 

Blog Posts and Resources Mentioned:

 

Fisher Price Little People Bathroom Set

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