December Whole Class Special Ed Lesson Plans For Push-In

December Whole Class Special Ed Lesson Plans For Push-In

Planning whole class push-in lessons for your special education classrooms can be stressful because you have a LOT of deadlines before winter break. In this Real Talk SLP podcast episode, I share December special ed lesson plans you can do as a co-teaching activity. Planning engaging Christmas speech and language activities for the whole class doesn’t have to be stressful because you walk away from this episode with fresh ideas for what to plan!

Special Ed Lesson Plans for December

Here are the December whole class special ed lesson plan ideas shared in this episode:

  • Making DIY wrapping paper to use to wrap their homemade crafts or gifts for parents
  • Hot chocolate activity – students can prepare hot chocolate for the school staff and work on functional communication when giving the hot chocolate.
  • Making Christmas trees or winter tree art projects to work on speech and language goals. Read a Christmas tree boo, read a winter tree poem or learn about trees before doing the craft.
  • Go on a gingerbread man or candy cane hunt to work on body in the group, inferencing, and where questions
  • Decorating cookies to work on speech and language skills. Make sure to listen to the episode to hear about my tips for using this as a social pragmatic lesson.
  • Make cinnamon apple sauce ornaments and then they can wrap them up with their DIY wrapping paper.
  • December can be a game theme where each week you teach the students a new game that they could play with their family over the winter break. Listen to the episode to hear my tips for how to pick games.
  • Make gumdrop or marsh mallow towers to see who can make the tallest tower.

 

 

Tips for Planning Special Ed Push-In Lessons for December

Remember that some of these Christmas speech therapy lesson plans can be broken into smaller lessons so you can stretch the activities across two or three weeks. This will help you plan for December and not stressing about what you will do each week in your push-in sessions.

Get ideas for planning Christmas special ed lesson plans to use as push-in speech therapy sessions

Resources For Planning Co-Teaching Special Ed Lesson Plans

Christmas-speech-therapy-push-in-lessons

The key to planning your co-teaching special ed lesson plans is knowing all the job roles of the educators involved. As you are planning your push-in lesson, consider how the activity will be set up. Reviewing different collaborative service models will help you with job roles and expectations.

December Speech Therapy Themes for Preschool & Elementary

December Speech Therapy Themes for Preschool & Elementary

 

When planning by themes for your preschool and elementary speech therapy caseload, it’s great to consider themes relevant to the month or season. So, I am sharing a GIANT list of December speech therapy themes you can use to plan for younger and older students. And, if you still need to narrow down a theme for December, I have four tips for how to choose a theme. 

One Thing to Remember with Theme-Based Therapy

Get ideas for December speech therapy themes you can plan for your preschool and elementary caseload.

As SLPs with high caseloads, remember that you DON’T have to use a theme for only one week. Planning can be time-consuming when you constantly prepare for a new themed unit each week. You will lead yourself to burn out FAST switching materials each. We want to stay energized from lesson planning, so when you pick a theme, use the mindset that you will use this theme for 2-4 weeks of therapy. I talk all about that on the Real Talk SLP podcast episode 45. 

SLP Themed Planner for the Year

Use my free-themed therapy yearly SLP planner to help you plan what themes you want to use for the year. It gives ideas for what to prepare and has an editable lesson plan template to keep notes on what you did with a theme. When you have notes for your themed units, it will jog your memory when you pull out the December speech therapy activities the following year. And, if you want to think ahead for January, there are LOTS of options for themes during that month.

December Speech Therapy Themes Around Holidays

Find ideas for December speech therapy ideas to use with your preschool and elementary caseload.

Plan units around holidays celebrated this time of year. If everyone on your caseload celebrates Christmas, plan activities around celebrating that holiday. Teaching Christmas around the world and how different cultures celebrate the holiday is a fun way to explore traditions from different places. You can also do a Hanukkah or Kwanzaa or learn about holidays worldwide

 

December Speech Therapy Themes Around Food

Many people have parties or give treats to friends and family during the holiday season. Here are some December speech therapy themes that are festive but not specifically celebrating Christmas:

 

  • The Gingerbread Man theme
  • Baking Cookies – for younger students, read a cookie-themed book and pretend to play with a cookie toy set. For older speech therapy students, learn how to make cookies or explore the history of cookie baking.
  • Candy canes – you can do science experiments, make crafts, or learn how candy canes are made.
  • December 7th is National Cotton Candy Day which could be a fun theme to plan or do a Candy theme.
  • Hot Chocolate theme for December 13th, National Cocca Day.
Get ideas for Christmas speech therapy ideas including non-holiday themes!

Alternatives to a Christmas Speech Therapy Theme

Learn about December preschool themes you can plan for your speech and language groups.

If you can’t use holiday-related themes, you can do some workarounds. For example, planning a Christmas tree theme would work great if you can do a Christmas theme. You can learn the history of the Christmas tree, pair it with books about Christmas trees, and plan extension activities with the trees. An alternative would be to do winter trees. Learn about trees in winter, incorporate winter tree crafts, or read a winter tree poem

 

Another alternative theme is gift giving or gift wrapping. Even if children don’t give gifts on Christmas or Hanukkah, they still give gifts for birthdays. Do the sequencing for wrapping gifts, teach perspective taking with giving a gift, or work on describing and inference skills for guessing what is in the gift box.

Join the Themed Therapy SLP Membership

Check out the Themed Therapy SLP membership if you love using themes for your speech therapy caseload but struggle to find the time and energy to plan your lessons. The membership is for busy school-based SLPs who serve Prek-5th grade students and want to streamline their therapy planning process.

 

When you become an SLP themester, you can access three themed therapy units a month!

 

The December speech therapy themes are dinosaurs, winter, and snowmen. An annual membership gives you access to 36 themes, including penguins, baking, space, and arctic animals, to name a few!

Themes Based on National Holidays

So many meaningful and fun national holidays would make for great themes to plan in December!

Here are some December speech therapy themes for national days:

 

  • December 8th is National Brownie Day
  • December 11th is National Stretching Day – learn about why stretching is important, follow directions while stretching, or read an article about stretching.
  • December 12th is Gingerbread House Day
  • December 15th is National Tea Day – do a pretend play tea party
  • Day 20 and 23 for Winter Solstice

What theme-based units do you plan in December?

Let me know in the comments what theme-based speech therapy lessons you plan for your elementary caseload. Tag me @themedtherapyslp with your themed activity, and I will share it in my stories!

Apple Speech Therapy Toys and Props

Apple Speech Therapy Toys and Props

You can do an apple speech therapy theme any time of the year, but it’s enjoyable to do it during the fall months when apples are harvested. If you love an apple theme and want some ideas for toys and props to use in your play-based speech therapy sessions, this is the post for you! I have rounded up all my favorite apple-themed props that you can use to increase engagement while targeting speech and language goals.

Amazon affiliate links are included in this blog post. When you purchase something with one of my affiliate links, I receive a small commission at no additional cost. 

Apple Props for Sorting Activities

Learn how to use these apple speech therapy props to cover speech and language goals.

Many of our students with language disorders have areas of need with vocabulary development. Often, our students need help with categorization, understanding wh-questions, and having depth of knowledge with vocabulary meanings. You can work on sorting with an apple theme by making DIY apple baskets using lunch-sized paper bags. I cut mine down and then added apple sorting printables to use in therapy for co-teaching and small groups. Another option is to use baskets that you may have around your house or empty cardboard boxes.

 

To follow an accurate theme-based approach, you would want to have sorting baskets to have concepts related to apples. For example, students could sort big and little apples, or category group items for fruits, containers, and foods with apples. You can do a skills-based approach with the fun apple props, too. Just know that a theme-based approach teaches speech and language skills using a context for the students to attach meaning to the new concepts and vocabulary. 

Free Apple-Themed Speech Therapy Lesson Plans

If you work with preschool and early elementary speech therapy students use this free Apple-themed speech therapy lesson plan. It has a free apple cooking visual recipe and visual supports for an easy apple paper plate craft. Plus, Live Love Speech and I added links to games, toys, and other materials that would fit an apple theme perfectly. 

Get your free apple-themed speech therapy lesson plan with a craft and cooking lesson.

Props for Sensory Bins & Hands-On Activities

Learn about how to make this apple speech therapy sensory bin to cover your student's goals!

Worksheets are very effective in practicing speech and language goals, but sometimes it can be boring for you and the students! You can use apple speech therapy props to work on LOTS of goals. For sensory bins, you can use Dixie cups or toilet paper rolls to make apple trees. Students can put the fallen apples back on the tree to work on basic concepts. Talk about quantities, make the trees different lengths to work on long/short, or use with your pretend play activities like going to an apple orchard.

Apple Surprise Party Boxes for Mini Trinkets & Mini Pictures

Raise your hand if you love the surprise party box toy sets from Learning Resources? You can have a similar toy prop using these plastic apple boxes. I have filled them with the Themed Therapy SLP verb and vocabulary flashcards (print four to a page) and mini trinkets. You can see a LOT of different versions on Amazon. Here are a few ways you can use them:

 

  • Answer wh-questions & describing about the items inside
  • Open/close and in/out
  • AAC CORE words for open, look, want, more, out, in
  • Preposition apple tree picking hunt – hide the apples around the room
  • Put in a basket and have kids see how many words they have to practice based on the number inside the apple

 

How would you use this prop in therapy? Share in the comments. 

Props for Apples & Tips for How to Use

Learn about these apple preschool activities and ways to make it hands-on!

If you have flashcards for articulation, phonology, or language, put plastic apples on top of the card. When they have “picked” all the apples, they can earn a game or start a new activity. Michael’s has a whole section of fake apples about 1.5-2 inches in size. 

 

For all my preschool SLPs working on colors and size, Learning Resources has a set of apples that are yellow, green, and red and also big and small. 

 

You can’t go wrong with using red and green pom pom balls to act as an apple-picking game. Roll a die or spin a spinner to see how many apples you picked. Students can put the pom poms on the open-ended game mats from the Themed Therapy SLP membership to see who picks the most apples.

 

Another variation with the pom pom balls is using them to feed the animals while reinforcing any goal. 

What apple-themed toys and props do you use in speech therapy?

Do you have a favorite apple toy, game or prop that you use in therapy? I would love to know what it is and how you use to it plan engaging sessions. Share in the comments or tag me on social media @thedabblingspeechie with a pic of it in action. 

Check out these apple-themed speech therapy ideas for preschool and early elementary.
Low Prep Halloween Speech Activities For Mixed Groups

Low Prep Halloween Speech Activities For Mixed Groups

When October hits, everything seems to be coming at you at once, right? IEP meetings, referrals, progress reports due, and teachers needing support for their students. That leaves NO time for planning engaging speech therapy lessons. So, I wanted to share some easy and free Halloween speech therapy activities you can adapt for your mixed groups in October. If you love Halloween-themed speech therapy activities, this one will be perfect for younger and older students!

Halloween Speech Therapy Free Google Slides

Get these free Halloween speech therapy activities for your mixed groups!

So many cute Halloween costumes are floating around on Pinterest and Google Photos. So, why not use them as a Halloween-themed speech therapy activity? To keep things organized, adding your photos and Giphy to Google Slide templates is a great way to have an activity ready to go year after year. The templates include a variety of slides that you can customize:

 

  • Compare and contrast graphic organizer.
  • I see sentence starter and AAC CORE words slide.
  • Explaining if you would wear the costume to work on syntax and complex sentences, as well as explaining how to make the costume
  • Sentence starters for using the conjunction “because” to express opinion, reasoning, and conjunctions
  • Rate the costume to explain your opinion and describe by attributes.

Tech Tips for Using the Google Slides

You can duplicate the slide with the Google Slides templates to make multiple costume slides for your groups. It is worth the time to add pictures of Halloween costumes because once it’s prepped, you can pull it up over and over again in minutes!

To duplicate a slide, right-click your mouse and slide down to click duplicate. Then, go to Pinterest, Google Photos, or Giphy.com to search for Halloween costume pictures to add to your Google Slides. Adding a GIF is super easy and is explained around the 8-minute mark of this video. 

 

Make sure to prepare your Halloween costume pictures BEFORE students enter because there can be inappropriate GIFs or photos when searching. 

Use Halloween costumes to cover a variety of speech and language goals!

Tips for Adapting This Costume Activity for Speech and Language Goals

Easily cover your speech and language goals with these Free Halloween Google Slides templates.

If you have students working on speech sound goals, find Halloween costumes that have your student’s target speech sound. Give them a challenge list of words to use that are sound-loaded to describe costumes.

 

Have your students describe the costume by attributes and adjectives for vocabulary goals. Pick some tier II vocabulary words to discuss while talking about the costumes. Review the tier II vocabulary word definitions before pulling up the Google Slides. Encourage students to use the vocabulary words during the lesson. For example, you could use the words brilliant, prepare, fragile, inspire, or create while discussing the costumes.

 

Ask WH questions about the costumes.

 

Use this free sentence frame graphic organizer to build complex sentences about the costumes.

Create problems that the people could encounter while wearing the costume or trick-or-treating. Have students come up with solutions.

Discuss how to comment when you see someone in costume you love or don’t love. Share perspectives of tone of voice and how certain comments could hurt someone’s feelings. 

 

How Would You Use These Halloween Speech Activities in Therapy?

I would love to know how you would address speech and language goals on your caseload with these activities! Make sure to tag me @thedabblingspeechie if you use these with your Halloween-themed unit. 

Use Halloween costume pictures that have your students speech sounds for an easy Halloween articulation activity!
Pumpkin Sensory Bin for Play-Based Speech Therapy

Pumpkin Sensory Bin for Play-Based Speech Therapy

It’s officially the fall season, so it’s time to break out your pumpkin-sensory bins! One of the best ways to plan for your play-based speech therapy sessions is by making sensory bins that you can adapt and use to cover many goals. You can follow your student’s lead using these bins, and it won’t be stressful because you can download my FREE pumpkin-themed speech therapy cheat sheet for your bins (scroll down for the pink button.) Hopefully, these sensory bin ideas will help you plan for your pumpkin speech therapy activities unit. 

 

This blog post contains Amazon affiliate links for your convenience. I receive a small commission at no additional cost when you use my links.

Pumpkin Sensory Bin Fillers for Your Container

Use these pumpkin-themed sensory bin ideas to cover your play-based speech therapy sessions.

Any fall-themed sensory bin fillers will work, but anything that represents hay, grass, or dirt will work great if you want to make a pumpkin patch. Here are some suggestions:

 

Pro tip: Use the fillers for your fall sensory bins too!

Pumpkin Speech Therapy Materials for Your Sensory Bins

To find some pumpkin speech therapy materials for your bins, be on the lookout for items during the fall season. My favorite spots to find pumpkin-themed items are Dollar Tree, Michael’s, Hobby Lobby, and Amazon.

When you are considering what to buy, look through your pumpkin books to help come up with a list of materials you want to add. For a pumpkin patch sensory bin, you would want to find these items:

For a five-little pumpkin sensory bin, some materials that would work well would be the following:

 

Learn how to make pumpkin speech therapy sensory bins for your play-based learning and mixed groups!
Get speech therapy pumpkin activities for your Prek-5th grade caseload.

In the Themed Therapy SLP membership, we provide pumpkin-themed verb and vocabulary flashcards that you can print, cut out, and throw in your sensory bin with paper clips on the flashcards. Use your magnetic wand to have kids select cards. 

Pumpkin Pie Sensory Bin

Use these pumpkin sensory bin ideas to cover your play-based speech therapy sessions.

If you read a pumpkin-themed book that incorporates baking a pumpkin pie, like Big Pumpkin by Erica Silverman or The Runaway Pumpkin by Kevin Lewis, making a pumpkin pie sensory bin would be a perfect extension activity. To make this bin, you can add the following: 

 

Another alternative is to make a pumpkin muffin sensory bin from TurnerTots.

Using Your Bin in Play-Based Speech Therapy Sessions

Now that you have your bin made, it’s time to use it in therapy! Here are some ways that you can use these sensory bins in your play-based speech therapy sessions:

 

  • Focus on retelling the story using the sensory bin materials.
  • Name the pumpkins different silly names, but ensure they are loaded with your student’s speech sound. Each time they pick a pumpkin, they must practice its name.
  • Work on syntax, MLU, and morphemes by having the pumpkins do verb actions, or use your Little People to do actions while at the pumpkin patch, such as lift, pick, carry, pull, bend, pay, drive, carve, walk, etc. ‘
  • Target spatial and basic concepts. Try to work on the concepts in pairs, such as in and out, on and off, many and few, fast and slow, or big and small (add different-sized pumpkins to do that.) You can use printables from my fall sensory bin companion with different-sized pumpkins.
  • Ask and answer wh-questions such as “Where are we going?” “How many pumpkins do you have?” “What size is your pumpkin?”
  • AAC CORE words for I, find, look, yes, no, big, little, more, go, come, like, don’t like
Pumpkin speech therapy activities to help you plan for your preschool and early elementary caseload.
Use this free pumpkin sensory bin lesson plan for your play-based speech therapy sessions.

If you want a cheat sheet to help you navigate using your pumpkin sensory bin in the moment with your mixed groups or play-based speech therapy sessions, grab this free pumpkin cheat sheet!

Tips for Using the 5 Little Pumpkins Sensory Bin

Have a fun jack-o-lantern sensory bin to pair with the song 5 Little Pumpkins

In preschool, singing the 5 Little Pumpkins song is a great way to build vocabulary and attention span, teach gestures, practice emotions, and increase participation. You can pair your 5 Little Pumpkins sensory bin with books and songs such as this one for emotions or by The Kiboomers

 

Here are some speech and language goals to target with this bin:

  • Have the pumpkins exhibit different emotions and students can practice using those facial expressions or tone of voice to show that emotion with phrases such as “Oh no!” or “I’m ______.”
  • Give different amounts of pumpkins to students in the group or with figurines and ask who has more, less, or the same.
  • Target verbs such as roll, fly, run, pick, carve, sit
  • Teach basic concepts such as night/morning, big/little, happy/sad, dark/light
  • Using mini orange solo cups, you can put mini trinkets underneath the pumpkins and have students see what is under them.
  • When you roll each pumpkin away, pick a place where they will go and then have students work on answering “where” questions. 

If you need visuals to pair with your 5 Little Pumpkin sensory bin, we have some in the open-ended activities for the pumpkin theme in the membership

More Fall-Themed Sensory Bins for Speech Therapy

When you finish your pumpkin unit, doing an apple sensory bin or falling leaves sensory bin is perfect for the fall season. If you make a sensory bin, make sure to tag me on social media @thedabblingspeechie 

Plan an engaging speech therapy pumpkin activity with a sensory bin!
Streamlining Your Speech Therapy Report Writing Process Ep 105

Streamlining Your Speech Therapy Report Writing Process Ep 105

When it comes to speech therapy report writing, most SLPs let out a huge groan because writing a legally defensible speech therapy assessment report can take hours! And, with large caseloads finding the time and the brain energy to analyze your assessment results can be very draining. That’s why I invited Michelle Boisvert, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, RSP-ADHD, the co-founder of Easy Report Pro, to discuss ways to streamline your speech reports so that you can check that off your list with less stress and more time to do the other caseload management tasks.

Why Are Speech Therapy Reports So Important?

Why Are Speech Therapy Reports So Important?

Michelle breaks down the importance of why speech therapy reports are so important for determining eligibility and areas of need in the school setting. The assessment report summarizes if a child meets Ed Code eligibility and the areas of need for services and accommodations on the IEP.

Types of Speech Report Template Writers

We discussed having templates for speech therapy reports is so helpful with saving time! Oftentimes, SLPs create a library of templates for assessment batteries and different portions of the report, which can take TONS of time to do. Or, we pull up a previous report and use that as a template, which leaves room for errors with having the wrong name, dates, or pronouns in the report.

We discussed having templates for speech therapy reports is so helpful with saving time! Oftentimes, SLPs create a library of templates for assessment batteries and different portions of the report, which can take TONS of time to do. Or, we pull up a previous report and use that as a template, which leaves room for errors with having the wrong name, dates, or pronouns in the report.

Must-Dos For Good Speech Assessment Report Writing

During the episode, Michelle shares the MUST-DOS SLPs needed to be included in every report that they write for assessments. We discussed having checklists to help you with including all necessary information as well as making sure to include a thorough background and history section. Michelle also pointed out that the standard assessment results need to match the summary and conclusion of the report. It also is helpful for SLPs to explain the assessment results and how they impact the child’s educational access.

During the episode, Michelle shares the MUST-DOS SLPs needed to be included in every report that they write for assessments. We discussed having checklists to help you with including all necessary information as well as making sure to include a thorough background and history section. Michelle also pointed out that the standard assessment results need to match the summary and conclusion of the report. It also is helpful for SLPs to explain the assessment results and how they impact the child’s educational access.

Easy Report Pro Can Help Save You Time with Report Writing

Raise your hand if you would LOVE to shave off 2-3 hours to your report writing. With Easy Report Pro, you can use their dynamic assessment templates and upload your templates to craft a thorough speech therapy assessment report confidently! You won’t have to worry about making name, date, or pronoun errors. And, you can save brain energy by not having to come up with descriptive wording because you will have a starting point with all the templates. You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial using my affiliate link and  my code: DABBLING to get an extra 30 days for free. That means you can use this speech report tool for 60 days FREE.

 

Get tips for how to use themes with articulationspeech disorders

Stay in Touch with Michelle

Learn how to use speech therapy themes for your articulation and phonology disorders

If you have more questions about Easy Report Pro or assessment reports, you can find Michelle on Instagram. One of the coolest features of this tool is that you can schedule a 1:1 virtual onboarding call to get all your report-writing questions answered, and they will also help you work on a report while navigating the tool! =

Streamlining Your Speech Therapy Report Writing Process Ep 105

by The Dabbling Speechie

Speech Therapy Schedule Template & Tips for How to Make EP 104

Speech Therapy Schedule Template & Tips for How to Make EP 104

When it comes to making your speech therapy schedule in the school setting, the process can be overwhelming and ever changing. There is no PERFECT way to make your speech therapy schedule, but after making a schedule for many years, I do have some tips and tricks for you. In this Real Talk SLP podcast episode, I share my biggest piece of advice for how to approach the speech therapy schedule as well as tools, tips, and tricks for streamlining the process.

Tools and Software to Help You Create Your Speech Schedule

Using paper and pencil can work really well for creating your speech schedule, but there are some digital tools that have speech therapy schedule templates to help with updating your schedule throughout the school year. Here are some of the tools mentioned in this episode:

 Swivel Scheduler by Maureen Wilson

SLP Scheduler

Google Forms for getting teacher requests (free Google Form for getting classroom teacher requests)

Speech Therapy Schedule Template

Free Speech Therapy Schedule Template

Speech Therapy Schedule Template

Put your speech therapy schedule on a Google Doc (there is a free one on this podcast episode) and make a copy each week to make any group changes, add in meetings, when you will assess students and other tasks you need to do.

 

Steps for Creating Your Speech Therapy Schedule

 

  1. Get the master schedule from the school secretary for recesses
    • Find out the teacher’s schedules either by asking for a copy if they have that or send them a Google Form to fill out times to avoid pulling their kids.
    • You can tell them to give 1st, 2nd, 3rd choices, but explain in your email that you have X amount of students on your caseload and cannot fit in 50 kids from 8-8:30 or 2:30.
    • If you are considering doing co-teaching, take the time to meeting with those teachers to find the best times, discuss roles and expectations. Schedule those first.
    • Your self contained classrooms tend to have a little more flexibility so if you run into scheduling shifts, maybe approach them.
    • Get PE, RSP services and RTI schedules
  2. Block off your assessment and  paperwork time. We had a day to switch between our sites to do paperwork, testing, etc. Do not put students during that blocked off time.
  3. Get RSP schedules, RTI to reference and check in with those specials to see if there is anything they are doing with scheduling
  4. Use post its or some sort of system for documenting the students age, teacher and service minutes. Know when you CAN’T see students.
  5. Create your first draft of the schedule and either do a run through making notes of what worked/didn’t work, or send it out to teachers via Google Doc for them to see if there are any issues with their student’s speech time.
  6. Make changes as needed throughout the school year.

 

Speech Therapy Schedule Template

Tips and Ideas for Streamlining Your Speech Schedule

Speech Therapy Schedule Template
  • Speech is beautiful recommends color  coding students by feature in your schedule

     

    Try to group by classroom or age group. If you can group by similar goals that is a benefit or try to look at language goals to see which  ones are easier to do with other articulation and phonology sounds

     

    Consider having a scheduling party in the lunch room, bring donuts have them find times for their students.

     

    Whatever you do, send out the schedule to each teacher and let them check it out. They usually can help spot errors or issues that you may have not seen.

     

    If you have any tips for creating your speech therapy schedule share in the comments!

Ep 104 Speech Therapy Schedule Template & Tips for How to Make

by The Dabbling Speechie

If You Take a Mouse to School Speech Therapy Lesson Plan – Ep 103

If You Take a Mouse to School Speech Therapy Lesson Plan – Ep 103

When it comes to speech therapy lesson planning, it can get a big overwhelming because we don’t just serve one specific treatment area. We serve articulation, phonology, language, social pragmatics, fluency, narrative language, etc. So, today I wanted to share how you can use the book If You Take a Mouse to School by Laura Numeroff to cover a LOT of speech and language goals.

Updates and Resources Mentioned in the Real Talk SLP Podcast:

 Join the Themed Therapy SLP membership (doors are opening for the year next week of August 21st)

 New sets of the Simon’s Cat Speech Therapy Cheat Sheets Growing Bundle will be added at the end of August or sooner!

Where to Find the Book for Your Literacy-Based Speech Therapy Sessions

Read the book at the carpet and then split up your groups into three stations. You can see this REEL with the group activities in action. While reading the book, make sure to include iconic gestures and shared book reading strategies. </p>
<p>Station #1: </p>
<p>Mystery Lunch Game where you put in school related items into a lunchbox or backpack. You can pair with themed mini trinkets, printables (we have school printables in the Themed Therapy SLP membership), or school items around your room and house. </p>
<p>Station #2: </p>
<p>Sorting School Items into Categories with the printables from the back-to-school push-in language lesson plan guide. You can work on sorting playground, lunch food, toys, etc. </p>
<p>Station #3:</p>
<p>Pretend play packing your lunch activity using your play food and a lunch box to work on following directions, sharing opinion, targeting AAC CORE words like/don’t like, modeling spatial concepts, sequencing the steps for packing a lunch, or play “What’s missing?” by giving inference clues for what they need to pack next in their school lunch.<br />

Grab the book on Amazon, use the YouTube read aloud, get it on Scholastic, or hunt for a copy at a thrift store! You can also snag a If You Take a Mouse to School story retell prop kit on Amazon as well.

 

Amazon affiliate links are provided for your convenience. I receive a small commission at no additional cost to you.

Check out more details for how to set up your push-in lesson for If You Take a Mouse to School:

Read the book on the carpet and split your groups into three stations. You can see this REEL with the group activities in action. While reading the book, include iconic gestures and shared book reading strategies.

 

Station #1:

 Mystery Lunch Game, where you put school-related items into a lunchbox or backpack. You can pair with themed mini trinkets, printables (we have school printables in the Themed Therapy SLP membership), or school items around your room and house.

 

Station #2:

Sorting School Items into Categories with the printables from the back-to-school push-in language lesson plan guide. You can work on sorting playground, lunch food, toys, etc.

 

Station #3:

Pretend play packing your lunch activity using your play food and a lunch box to work on following directions, sharing opinion, targeting AAC CORE words like/don’t like, modeling spatial concepts, sequencing the steps for packing a lunch, or play “What’s missing?” by giving inference clues for what they need to pack next in their school lunch.

Some more extension speech therapy activities for the book, If You Take a Mouse to School:

Make a story prop kit with items from the story to help with story retell and sequencing. You can also buy this set on Amazon.

 

Rock Chalk Speech Talk has some really fun ideas to go with this book like some Yoga poses, science experiment, and a DIY story prop kit for this story!

 

Pair a craft with the story, such as this mouse writing craft, shape mouse craft, or paper bag mouse craft. You can also use a pencil or bus craft in the Themed Therapy SLP membership.

 

Make up another version if you take a mouse to school and substitute it for a different animal, the child’s pet, or something wild like a lion or dinosaur.

 

With a plush mouse or the mouse puppet in the prop kit for this book, have the mouse visit different places and workers around the school. Work on where questions, who questions, and explain the jobs of the different school workers.

 

For students working on syntax and conjunction goals, work on cause and effect with this story. You can teach connecting words such as “then,” “because,” “since,” etc.

 

Look through your book and write down any key vocabulary or verbs from the book. Grab a die and have students roll to see what number they get. Use the roll-a-word game to have students practice depth of knowledge with vocabulary words from the book.

What Activities Do You Plan with the Book?

If you have any great activities or ways you incorporate speech and language goals using this book, share them in the comments or tag me on social media! Felice Clark (thedabblingspeechie)

Ep 103 If You Take a Mouse to School Speech Therapy Lesson Plan

by The Dabbling Speechie

Beach Theme Speech Therapy Tips for Targeting Multiple Goals

Beach Theme Speech Therapy Tips for Targeting Multiple Goals

One of the many reasons I love themed therapy is that with one theme you can use all different books, activities, and materials to cover the wide range of ages and goals that so many of our caseloads entail. Not only does this create fun and relevant therapy for our students, but it also makes planning easier. During the summer months, using beach theme speech therapy activities is a great way to reinforce your student’s experiences with going to the beach. 

There are countless books, activities, and materials to use for beach therapy but I have made planning that much easier with my Themed Therapy SLP membership. Minimize your prep time with themed materials for your preschool through 5th-grade students who are working on speech, language, and social language skills.

Tips for Targeting Multiple Goals with a Speech Therapy Beach Theme

When using a beach theme or any theme with your speech therapy caseload, the key to targeting multiple goals in a session is to pick materials that have lots of opportunities to discuss the beach vocabulary and concepts. Oftentimes, books are a great material to choose from because you can easily adapt to speech and language goals.

Other options for beach-themed materials could include sensory bins, YouTube non-fiction videos, virtual field trip, pretend play activities, and hands-on STEM projects such as building a sandcastle. You will learn how to target a variety of goals with beach books, props and sensory bins.

Get tips for how to target multiple goals with a beach theme.

Beach Themed Books for Speech Therapy 

Learn how to adapt beach books to cover speech and language goals

Books are a fun way to experience the beach from your speech room! There are all different ways to break a book down to address speech and language goals. Let’s say I’m planning to use “A Beach Tail” by Karen Lynn Williams with my 2nd grade group. (Here’s where to buy the book on Amazon, and here’s a YouTube read aloud) This is how I’d use it to target different goals.

How to Target Different Goals with the Book A Beach Tail by Karen Lynn Williams

  • Before I read the book, I’ll review tier II words such as sturdy, smooth, giant, scurry and suddenly with my students. Since these words are adverbs and adjectives, I’ll ask if they can think of something that is sturdy, smooth, giant, scurry or sudden
  • I also like to talk about the title of this book! What is a tale vs. a tail? Can they make a prediction about what this book might be about? What might happen in a beach tale? Why might the author have changed it to tail?

 

  • While reading the book, there’s ways to work on speech and language goals. For my students working on speech sounds, we’ll do a sound hunt! Can they find their speech sound in the book? If there’s limited examples of their sound in the book, give them a sentence starter that involves their sound. You can ask them questions throughout the book that they can answer with their sentence starter. (For /s/ or /s-blends/, “I see/spy…” For /l/, “Look! It’s a…” For final /z/, “It is…”)
  • Can your students find the examples of onomatopoeia in this story? There are so many examples of onomatopoeia (swish, swoosh) and other sound effects (uh-oh, zig zag, roar) in this story! Have your students find them and read it with different expressions (scary, exciting, surprising, etc.). 
    Learn how to adapt the book A Beach Tail in your literacy-based speech therapy sessions.

    Targeting Multiple Goals After Reading Your Beach-Themed Book

    Learn literacy-based speech therapy ideas for the book A Beach Tail by Karen Lynn Williams
    • After you’re done reading the book, ask comprehension questions like Who went to the beach with Gregory? What did he draw in the sand? What did he find while making the lion’s tail longer? How does he find his way back? Don’t forget to follow up on the question, Why is this book called “A Beach Tail” and notA Beach Tale?”
    • This book allows from some great sequencing! Students can practice using sequencing words first, next, then, after, last, etc. Have some visuals prepared and students can re-tell the story using the visuals. Don’t forget to include all the story elements, too
    • If you’re looking for social skills to target, consider some conversation starters related to the book. In the story, Gregory got lost after drawing a long tail on his sandy lion. Ask: Did Gregory follow his Dad’s rules? What happened when he didn’t follow the rules? Have you ever been lost? What did you do? What would you do if you were Gregory? 

    Adapting Beach Sensory Bins for Speech Therapy

    I love using sensory bins during my speech therapy sessions, and a beach sensory bin is no exception. There are so many different fillers you can use like kinetic sand, pom pom balls, water beads, real or plastic rocks, and more. Add in mini buckets, shells, mini paper umbrellas, mini beach animals and other mini figurines! Students will love to see a “mini beach” in your speech room! 

     

    Now that you have your materials ready for a beach-themed sensory bin, start thinking about how you want to work on speech and language with it! Use a sensory bin after you read a beach-themed book with your students. Work on beach-related vocabulary like noun functions and action words. Ask WH questions and work on basic concepts like position words, quantitative concepts, and qualitative concepts. Make word lists with your student’s target sounds or plan a carrier phrase with their speech sound for them to use while playing with the sensory bin. 

     

    For more tips on beach sensory bins, I wrote a whole post about them here. 

    Learn how to adapt a beach sensory bin for speech and language goals.

    Beach-Themed Props in Speech Therapy

    Learn how to do beach-themed props in speech therapy.

    There are so many props you can use with the beach theme, and chances are you probably already have them! Grab a towel, sunglasses, sunscreen, bucket, shovel, and beach bag. To learn more about where to find themed props head here

    Use these props to work on spatial concepts (“Put the sunglasses under the bucket”), answering WH questions (“Where are the sunglasses?”), or for pretend play.

    One prop-based speech therapy activity I love is packing a beach bag! Here are a few of my ideas:

    • Read (or listen to) “How Will We Get to the Beach” by Brigitte Luciani & Eve Tharlet. Then, pack a beach bag. Your students can sort things that you bring to the beach, and things to not bring to the beach. 
    • Make a list of what to pack and why you’ll need it. 
    • Pack a beach bag loaded with your students’ speech sounds! Students can reach in and talk about what they find. In a group with mixed goals, students can work on describing the items, including appearance, function, parts, and category. 

     

    Read all about how to use beach balls in speech therapy in my post.

    Learn About the Beach in Speech Therapy

    Whether you use a nonfiction passage or a YouTube video, learning new facts about the beach is just another way to target speech and language goals with your elementary school caseload. 

    Find nonfiction passages on Wonderopolis or Newsela. On Wonderopolis, read about Where Sand on Beaches Come From or How Sea Shells Form. With either of these passages, ask your students what they think the answer will be. While you’re reading, review any vocabulary words you find. Vocabulary words are highlighted in yellow and include definitions of the words! At the beginning of the article, there are a few questions you can ask your students at the end. Ask your students these questions and use their own words to answer the questions. At the end of the articles, there are a few ideas for extension activities! Try them out. 

     

    You can also use YouTube videos to learn more about the beach like What Causes Waves or Where Sand Comes From. Students can make predictions about either of these questions. While watching, stop the video and talk about what’s being said. Are there words they don’t understand? Ask comprehension questions to make sure they’re able to follow along. After the video, talk about if any of their predictions were right. Then, talk about what causes waves or where sand comes from. You can discuss concepts like cause and effect and/or work on sequencing. I often find myself learning something new about the beach (or other topics) when I use nonfiction pieces in therapy!

     

    Learn how to use Beach-themed YouTube videos to cover speech and language goals.

    Ideas for Other Summer-Related Themes

    Get beach themed speech therapy ideas and how to adapt for mixed groups.

    Before or after your beach theme, don’t forget to use an ocean theme to cover the land and sea! I have a few other ideas to help you plan for summer speech therapy sessions like some camping activity ideas or pool play sets. These posts will help a bunch with your PreK-5th grade caseload!

     

    Between books, sensory bins, props, and nonfiction passages, a beach theme is sure to be a hit in your speech sessions! During the summer, so many of our minds are thinking about the beach! It’s safe to say using a beach theme in speech therapy will decrease planning time and keep you and your students engaged! How do you bring the beach to your speech sessions? Share your ideas on Facebook or Instagram and tag me @thedabblingspeechie 

    Shark Week Speech Therapy Lesson Plan for Upper Elementary

    Shark Week Speech Therapy Lesson Plan for Upper Elementary

    It’s late Summer and you turn on the Discovery Channel. What do you find? Dun dun… dun dun… SHARK WEEK! Each summer, Shark Week mesmerizes everyone with wild stories and footage. What If we take shark week from Discovery Channel and make it into Shark Week Speech Therapy? You can use this theme as a lesson plan for upper elementary students and adapt it for small groups and co-teaching (push-in or whole class lessons). To read more about push-in setup, check out this blog post. At first glance, it may seem like this is a one-week kind of theme, but I’ve put together a few of my favorite ideas that will help you plan shark activities for at least 2 weeks.

    Amazon affiliate links are included for your convenience in this blog post. When you use my affiliate link, I receive a small comission at no additional charge.

    Get Your FREE Themed SLP Planner

    Want to keep track of your lesson plans for future years? Use the free editable themed therapy lesson planner and idea guide to help you plan out your themes for the school year. It’s a free download on this blog post.

    With a themed speech therapy calendar that is editable and over 100 seasonal and nonseasonal themed ideas, you will have your monthly themes planned out for the school year!

    Get your free SLP planner for themed therapy.

    Shark Week Book for Speech Therapy

    Learn about shark themed books you can use in your speech therapy lesson plnas.

    “Shark Lady” by Jess Keating is the perfect book for shark week speech therapy. Buy it on Amazon or watch it a YouTube read aloud by Story Time with Ms. Jay. Get Epic also has an animated Shark Lady book. Use EdPuzzle to listen, too.

    The Before: 

    • Review any Tier 2 vocabulary words with your students. Some tier 2 words I found were fearless, doubt, eager, myth, and devise
    • Ask your students a big thinking question such as “Have you ever seen an animal that you thought was beautiful but other people thought was scary or ugly?”

    The During

    • Stop every couple of pages to ask a think-aloud question. 
    • Point to pictures in the book that represent some of the vocabulary words. 
    • Talk about character traits. How would they describe Eugenie as the story goes on?
    • This EdPuzzle has questions built in with picture choice answers.

     

    The After

    • Complete this Quizziz about the story. 
    • Discuss how the word “fearless” relates to this book. How is Eugenie Clark fearless?
    • Create a timeline about Eugenie Clark. What other questions do they have about her?
    • Do a word search like this one from Wordmint.

     

    Want a cheat sheet for “Shark Lady”? I have a full lesson plan cheat sheet for this book as part of May’s “Ocean Animals” theme in the SLP Themed Therapy membership.

    Use this easy shark week speech therapy lesson plan for upper elementary.

    Shark Week Videos

    Get shark week speech therapy lesson plan ideas for upper elementary.

    Videos are the start to some great shark activities that you can use in small group or whole class instruction.

    SciShow on YouTube has great options with Super Sharks or How Sharks Find Food with Electricity. After watching the video, ask comprehension questions. What questions do your students have about sharks?

    If you’re using this as a push-in lesson, here are some ideas:

    • Break your students into groups and assign staff members to different groups.
    • Provide whiteboards and dry erase markers for each group.
    • Pause the video after a key point is shared and ask the class a question.
    • Allow each group to write an answer on their white board, and then share it with the class.
    • When the video is finished, you can have the students write out the main idea, supporting details and a summary sentence about the video.
    • Don’t forget to float between groups and ask questions or help keep students engaged.
    • Close your session with: What is one cool thing you learned about sharks?

    Some other fun videos to watch are LIVE shark cams!ith these shark themed speech therapy activities. Here are a few I found:

    Tips for Using the Shark Videos in Speech Therapy

    While watching the live feeds, talk about what the sharks are doing. How many do they see? How are they similar and different? What other fish do they see? Research sharks with your students. 

     

    You can also use these as some conversation starters—Have your students been to an aquarium? What did they think of it? Did they see sharks? How do they feel when they think or see sharks?

    Lots of great shark speech therapy activities for upper elementary.

    More Shark Speech Therapy Activities to Extend the Themed Lesson Plan

    Planning for your upper elementary students just got easier with these shark themed speech therapy activities.

    Like I said earlier, there is plenty of opportunity to extend Shark Week into multiple weeks with even more shark week ideas. After you’ve read “Shark Lady” and/or watched some Shark Videos, check out some of these shark activities.

    Mystery Doug has some fun videos with some questions your students might have about sharks. Doug answers

    Before you watch, ask your students what they think the answer is. After you watch, ask students if their predictions were right. Don’t forget to ask your students what questions they have about sharks!

    Brain breaks are always fun with students, especially in whole class instruction! Coach Corey Martin has a great movement break for you to complete. This is a great tool to break up your push-in lessons.

    Last but not least, don’t forget about Shark STEM. Learn about shark buoyancy with this YouTube video from the Houston Public Library. You’ll need a plastic bottle, sharpie, 1 balloon, vegetable oil, funnel and a large tub filled with water. While completing this, pause the video and ask your students what they think will happen. After, they can draw a picture of the activity, and verbally explain what happened and why it happened.

    Looking for More Shark Week Ideas 

     

    Shark Week(s) is a great speech therapy theme for students of all ages. If you’re an SLP serving Prek-5th, Speech Sprouts has some great shark activities for the preschool speech therapy population. What shark activities you are using in therapy?

    Planning for your upper elementary students just got easier with these shark themed speech therapy activities.
    thedabblingspeechie