10 ideas for using a pet hospital toy set in speech therapy

10 ideas for using a pet hospital toy set in speech therapy

Playing with toy sets is one of the best ways for kids to interact with their environments and learn about the things around them without getting into things they shouldn’t. Even more so, kids love animals, which is why pet hospital toy sets can be such a great tool to incorporate into your speech therapy sessions! While acquiring a pet hospital toy set is an upfront cost, there are so many different speech and language skills that you can target while “playing” with your speech students!

 

Where Can I Buy a Pet Hospital for My Speech Room?

There are a few different pet hospital toy sets available online. All of the ones I’m suggesting below can be found on Amazon, but you might be able to find them at stores like Target, too. The links below are Amazon affiliate links for your convenience.

  1. Critter Clinic Toy Vet Set
  2. Pet Vet Toy by B. Toys by Battat
  3. Learning Resources Pretend & Play Animal Hospital (This set is good for traveling SLPs that need lightweight materials to transport.)

Toy-Themed Therapy Resources

Need a cheat sheet guide to help you with targeting wh- questions, Tier II vocabulary, articulation, basic concepts, adjectives, and helpful therapy ideas for toys you use during play-based therapy? Grab this Toy Companion Cheat Sheet Guide for Prek-2nd grade and have stimulus targets mapped out for fourteen different toys. 

Using a Pet Hospital Toy Set in Speech Therapy with Younger-Aged Children

A pet hospital set can be used to target so many speech and language skills! Listed below are some of my favorite ways to engage children in these skills:

  1. Work on sequencing steps for cleaning a cut, wrapping a broken bone, grooming the pet, or doing a check-up.
  2. Work on CORE vocabulary with AAC to work on open, close, go, stop, need, want, my turn, and your turn.
  3. Work on following directions with basic concepts and prepositions.
  4. Put mini trinkets in the doors of the vet hospital that have students sounds, vocabulary, etc. The animals can open the doors to find what is in their space. Students can work on building grammar sentences, working on sounds, describing vocabulary, and answering wh- questions.
  5. Put items behind the doors to work on inferencing.
  6. Compare/contrast the different doctor tools and/or animals.
  7. Your animal is sick! Think of all the things and items they enjoy that you can do with them when the animal is healthy again.
  8. Work on story retell and have the child tell a story to their sick animal.
  9. Your new puppy or kitten just got his/her shots and is ready to come home. Make a list of all the things you need to buy for home. Talk about the noun’s functions.
  10. Make an animal obstacle course for the animal to enjoy after they are feeling better. Work on following directions, sequencing, and verb actions. 

How Do You Use a Pet Hospital Toy Set in Speech Therapy?

Do you have a fun way to engage your students with a pet hospital toy set in speech therapy? Share in the comments, tag me on Instagram @thedabblingspeechie, or email me at feliceclark@thedabblingspeechie.com.

Real Talk SLP episode 8

Today on the Real Talk SLP podcast, I wanted to talk about the ups and downs of finding relevant, engaging and practical professional development for the busy SLP.

As SLPs we are pulled very thin between conducting therapy, assessing, and all that fun paperwork.

In particular, school-based SLPs have to be knowledgeable about so many different areas because we treat a lot of disorders, and ages.

I decided to bring on my SLP blogger besties to have some real talk about professional development. Each one shares about the current struggles with finding good PD as well as recommending some resources that have helped them to feel confident about their clinical decisions.

Professional Development Resources for Busy SLPs

The Informed SLP is a resource we all have memberships and use regularly.

We all agreed that attending the ASHA Convention has lots of great presentations and so many options to chose from; however, it is expensive and difficult to take that time off of work. ASHA’s evidence maps can be a helpful place to start when looking for information on a certain topic.

A great alternative is to use Speech Pathology.com or Speech Therapy PD.

Natalie recommended The Impact of Unilateral Hearing Loss and Single Sided Defness for the Pediatric Population from SpeechPathology.com

Marueen recommended Intervention for Selective Mutism: The Nuts and Bolts of Behavioral Treatment

Hallie recommended Evidence Based Practice Treatment Approaches for Improving Vocabulary in Children with Language Disorders

I recommended any courses or presentations by Char Boshart who has a lot of courses on Speech Therapy PD. If you are interested in Speech Therapy PD (Use code: SLPROCKSTAR” to get $10 off either subscription).

I also just presented with Rehab Seminars and they had a lot of practical presenters that were very helpful including Barry M. Prizant, PhD, CCC-SLP and William Van Cleave, MA, Educational Consultant

We are all fans of FREE PD, right!? The SLP Summit is a free online webinar training that goes on twice a year during winter and summer. There are a ton of different topics and you can learn while sitting by the pool or your couch. 

We also discuss how the four of us SLPs came up with the idea for the Speech Retreat. It is a one day Professional Development that is packed with practical therapy ideas you can use tomorrow. Plus, we wanted to celebrate SLPs, so we include swag bags and LOTS of raffle prizes. Check it out at Speech Retreat and sign up for the April 13th Speech Retreat in Raleigh, NC.

What is your favorite PD or conference you attended?

I would love to know what relevant PD you have attended to help spread the word to other SLPs. Share in the comments or email me at feliceclark@thedabblingspeechie.com

St. Patrick’s Day Speech Therapy Activities

If you are wanting to plan effective speech therapy lessons, but are limited on time, then this blog post is for you. St. Patrick’s Day is a holiday coming up in March. You can use the St. Patrick’s Day speech therapy activities in this blog post to quickly find materials for your whole elementary caseload.

When I have a wide-range of ages and goals, themes help me to narrow my focus on planning. It helps take the overwhelm out of planning activities. Plus, I love seeing kids get engaged with my themes.

Today, I am sharing LOTs of speech and language activities to use for St. Patrick’s Day!

St. Patrick’s Day Books for Speech Therapy

Use some festive St. Patrick’s Day books in your therapy sessions. Work on vocabulary, grammar, wh-questions, story retell, and inferencing with these books.

Here are some of my fave books to use (amazon affiliate links provided):

Ten Lucky Leprechauns by Kathryn Heling and Deborah Hembrook

How to Trap a Leprechaun by Sue Fliess and Emm Randall

There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Clover by Lucille Colandro

How to Catch a Leprechaun by Adam Wallace

The Night Before St. Patrick’s Day by Natasha Wing

After I read the themed book, I plan extension activities to cover grammar and vocabulary goals. We work on noun-verb agreement, basic concepts, answering wh-questions and describing vocabulary using my St. Patick’s Day grammar and vocabulary activities.

I also use my St. Patrick’s Day language lesson plan guides to cover my whole class and small group lessons. You can read more about how I structure those lessons HERE.

St. Patrick’s Day Push-In Lesson Plans

For my push-in lessons, I do a whole class read aloud with a quick circle time activity. Then, we break up into small group stations. I plan three different stations and have myself and teachers faciliate a station. At my station, I make sure to do targeted practice for my students goals. 

The other two stations target language goals as well, but have cheat sheet guides for the teachers to help them implement the lesson. Catch the Leprechaun noun-functions and green items category sort are examples of language stations I would plan for two of the stations. Read more about structuring your push-in sessions in this blog post HERE.

Non-Fiction Passages for St. Patrick’s Day

Read Works is a free site that you can access St. Patrick’s Day articles. I use these articles with my older elementary students. I will be using this rainbow non-fiction passage. This site also includes vocabulary to target and wh-questions with answer choices. If I need progress monitoring data, I can collect data on listening comprehension in a quick second! You can also find articles on NewsELA.

St. Patrick’s Day Crafts for Speech Therapy

I am a big fan of using crafts when I have the time to prep them. They can be used to naturally target goals and can be sent home for additional practice. Additionally, many crafts can be adapted to use with mixed groups. Check out my windsock craft to see how I adapted to cover a lot of goals. I found this cute Shamrock man you can make in speech.

If you need some St. Patrick’s Day craft inspiration, this video has lots of fun, easy to prep ideas.

Rainbow Crafts for Speech Therapy

Make a rainbow craft that you can have students write or glue their speech or language targets on the different colors of the rainbow. It can be a great bulletin board display!

Or make this rainbow craft and work on following directions after you create it! You can target above, under, next to, in front and behind with this fun rainbow craft.

St. Patrick’s Day YouTube Videos for Speech Therapy

YouTube is your lesson planning friend! There are a lot of videos that discuss the history of St. Patrick’s Day.

Use EdPuzzle to create lesson plan questions with your videos. You plan the questions, and vocabulary you want to discuss with EdPuzzle, then show the video to your students. The video will automatically pause when it gets your question. Plan your lesson once and use over and over again!

St. Patrick’s Day Sensory Bins

Since part of the St. Patrick’s Day holiday is about wearing green, why not talk about green items! I use this green sensory bin companion from my St. Patrick’s Day Language Lesson Plan Guides to work on describing nouns by attributes. You can also see how I made a green sensory bin using toys/items around my speech room HERE.

I also love making a “Find the gold” sensory bin. This is a reinforcer bin to use with your mixed groups. I put plastic gold coins that I found at the Dollar Tree in the bin and a construction paper rainbow. Then, students roll a die. Whatever number they roll, that is how many gold coins they get to collect. The student practices his/her target skill and then the next student takes a turn. The student with the most gold wins! At the end of the game, you can work on who has more/less/most gold for some additional language practice!

Social Skill Idea for St. Patrick’s Day

For our speech students working on thinking about others, you can go on a “Catch the Leprechaun” school hunt. Print up these free clue cards from Cupcake for a Teacher and place them around the school. The last clue can have a pot of gold or a chocolate treat for your students. As you walk around the school, students have to follow the group plan and keep their bodies in the group. Check out this post to see how you can do this with The Gingerbread Man.

St. Patrick’s Day Idioms

Use St. Patrick’s Day idioms to work on figurative language. You can focus on idioms that relate to getting rich, being lucky and looking green! Here are a list of idioms you can teach your students.

-To thank ones lucky stars
-To hit the jackpot
-To luck out
-Goldmine
-Green with envy
-Give someone the green light
-Have a green thumb
-To feel green around the gills

What Activities Do You Plan for St. Patrick’s Day in Speech Therapy?

I would love to hear all the creative and engaging ways you plan therapy for St. Patrick’s day! Please share your best therapy ideas or tips in the comments or email me at feliceclark@thedabblingspeechie.com. Of course, you can always share a pic on Instagram and tag me @thedabblingspeechie. In my opinion, an SLP can never have to many therapy materials!

Sensory Bins For The Winter Season

Sensory Bins For The Winter Season

When it comes to planning therapy, SLPs want the lessons to be relevant to their students, aligned with best practices and engaging! That can be kind of tricky with our younger students.

Over the years, I discovered that sensory bins are an effective therapy material that covers a lot of goals and keeps hands busy. Today, I wanted to share all my winter sensory bin ideas you can use with your students.

Sensory bins using winter vocabulary to work on speech and language skills. #slpeeps #schoolslp #slps #slpsensorybin #sensorybin #sensoryplay #preschool #preschoollanguage #languageactivities

Why Creating Winter Sensory Bins Can Help You With Therapy Planning

You can create winter sensory bins that go along with your favorite book like The Mitten or The Snowy Day. Or you can just create a bin using winter themed vocabulary.

Since winter can last till March and sometimes April, this is a great theme to pick for sensory bins. I am excited to share all my ideas because I think at least one will spark some inspiration for your caseload! If you are completely new to using sensory bins, head over to my sensory bin page to see what they are all about! To see some of the winter sensory bins I have used in previous years, head to this BLOG POST.

Sensory bins using winter vocabulary to work on speech and language skills. #slpeeps #schoolslp #slps #slpsensorybin #sensorybin #sensoryplay #preschool #preschoollanguage #languageactivities


Winter Sensory Bin Fillers

A sensory bin filler are materials you put in the bin to fill it up. For winter, it is fun to have fillers that resemble snow. Here are some filler materials you can use (amazon affiliate links included):

-cotton balls

fabric stuffing for pillows

water beads

baking soda or instasnow

-white playdoh

-salt/sugar

-Styrofoam for icebergs or use Styrofoam balls

-Glass beads to make a frozen lake

Marshmallows

-Shredded white paper

What other winter themed fillers would you put in your bin?

Container Ideas For Sensory Bins

You can use any type of container. I recommend containers that have clasps on the lid. When I decided to use water beads for my penguin sensory bin, I wanted to put the beads in something disposable.

So, I used a disposable foil pan. After I used the water beads for the day, I put them in a sealed plastic bag, so I could re-use them for the whole week. Then, I just threw the beads and the container away.

Winter Sensory Bins Ideas

Sensory Bins for the winter season to work on language with your K-2 students. #slpeeps #schoolslp #speechies #slps #slp2b #sensorybin #slpsensorybin #sensoryplay

Work on identifying winter vocabulary by attributes. You can do this activity receptively or expressively with students. Print out winter vocabulary words and place in your bin. Then, have your students look for “something you can ride”. Students can then add more details about the word using category group, parts, location, texture, etc. You can also work on building MLU and grammar markers with this bin. If you need a winter vocabulary sensory bin, this one comes in my Winter PUSH-IN Language Lesson Plan Guides.

Students love when you can feed cards into a character! I made this feed the snowman sensory bin to work on learning about hot/cold food items. I also included other food items to work on different food categories. You can simultaneously work on past tense verbs and building MLU. This sensory bin is in my Snowman PUSH-IN Language Lesson Plan Guide.

Use winter vocabulary to make a sensory bin that works on superlative adjectives. You can work on big, bigger, and biggest. You can also describe the items and work on basic concepts. For example, you could say, “Put the green hat, behind the medium fire place.”

When I use a sensory bin, I like to make a cheat sheet of all the words and skills I can target. This helps me with navigating mixed groups much easier!! Print up kids doing different winter activities and place it in a winter snowy bin. Use your cheat sheet guide to target verbs, speech sounds, vocabulary, story retell, answering wh-questions and sequencing steps to do an activity such as sledding!

For your articulation students, make a snowball sensory bin! Your students can build their stash of snowballs each time they pick a snowball from the bin. If you have language students in your group, have them describe the item they chose, answer wh-questions, create a sentence with the vocabulary word or explain where and when you would use the item. Do you want these winter sensory bins for your caseload? All three of these bins are in my winter sensory bin companion that comes with lesson plans, a cheat sheet guide, printables for your bins and visual supports to help your students learn new skills. Everything is ready for you, so you can go into therapy ready to work on goals!

Do you have a sensory bin idea? I love seeing SLPs creations. The next time you make a sensory bin, snap a photo and tag me on instagram @thedabblingspeechie with the #slpsensorybin hashtag. Let’s inspire each other with new therapy material ideas! You can always email me a pic at feliceclark@thedabblingspeechie.com.

Real Talk SLP episode 2

In this episode of the Real Talk SLP, Felice interviews Maureen Wilson from The Speech Bubble SLP. You can find her TeachersPayTeachers store at The Speech Bubble SLP and check out her blog for helpful therapy ideas and resources to help you be a confident SLP.

Maureen and Felice talk about the ups and downs SLPs face when working out in the field. Both Maureen and Felice are elementary school based clinicians. Both share real examples hard situations they deal with managing their caseloads.

During this episode, Maureen shares some ways that SLPs can chose to shift his or her mindset when these bumps in the road happen. We may not be able to change the current situation, but there are positive things we can do to maintain a healthy outlook about our jobs.

One of the books Maureen recommends is The Energy Bus by John Gordon

Discussed in this podcast:

Tips and strategies for finding being a Happy SLP –  7 Things Happy SLPs Do Differently

Some of the tips Maureen shares about how to find happiness in the job are how to be positive, embracing imperfection and how to set boundaries at work. Maureen also discusses that asking for help is a sign of strength as an SLP.

Body In The Group With A Gingerbread Man Hunt

Body In The Group With A Gingerbread Man Hunt

During the month of December, I like to keep things festive, yet simple. And I like to use the same theme/book with as many groups as I can. The Gingerbread Man is a theme I use every year with my younger students. We can work on story retelling, vocabulary and perspective taking skills. Check out these activities I did last year to work on improving perspective taking using gingerbread man cookies. I find that the holiday season opens up opportunities for teaching perspective-taking and thinking about others. Today, I wanted to share a Body in the Group lesson I did with my 3-5th Special Day Classroom students using a gingerbread man hunt.

Body in the group activity using a Gingerbread Man Hunt to work on social thinking. #socialthinking #dabblingslp #autism #socialskills #bodyinthegroup #pragmatics #sped

What Is Body In The Group?

Body in the Group is a vocabulary term used from the Social Thinking Curriculum to explain how people demonstrate that they are part of a group conversation or social situation when they physically keep their body in a proximity of the group. When students work on group projects, or talk together on the playground, they show that they are thinking about group members by positioning their bodies nearby.

By teaching our students the concept of having their bodies in the group, we build their social awareness. They can better understand how to show others that they are thinking about them just by where they position their bodies.

What Is Brain In The Group?

Have you ever been in a place where your body is physically sitting in a group, but your brain is far, far away. Not sure why I just thought about my last department meeting? Hmmmmm……

We can teach our students the importance of having both their bodies and their brains in the group in order to show others that they are thinking about them. We show others that our brains are in the group by contributing relevant questions and comments that are on topic with what the speaker is talking about. This concept impacts our students in academic and social situations a LOT! If our students do not have their brains in the group, they miss a lot of information in the conversation. Typically, when my student’s brains aren’t in the group, they make off-topic comments. They will also talk only about their interests. When our brain is out of the group, this makes people feel like we aren’t listening to them. Which translates as rude behavior.

How You Can Work On Body In The Group On A Gingerbread Man Hunt

Has your school ever done a gingerbread man hunt during December? The teacher usually tells the students that there is a gingerbread man on the loose around the school. Students have to read the clues left by the gingerbread man to figure out where he went. It is a pretty fun activity that pairs well with the book!

Teach body in the group to your students with social skill needs by going on a gingerbread man hunt. #dabblingslp #socialthinking #bodyinthegroup #socialskills #sped #speechtherapy

I decided that I wanted to do this activity with my K-2 and 3-5 SDC classrooms. The teachers and staff helped with the activity. I printed up a FREE gingerbread man hunt and bought candy canes as the end of the hunt class surprise.

Teach body in the group to your students with social skill needs by going on a gingerbread man hunt. #dabblingslp #socialthinking #bodyinthegroup #socialskills #sped #speechtherapy

Before we went, I went over the hidden social rules that when we go somewhere as a group, we have to keep our bodies close by, so we stay as a group. We role played standing and walking as a group (no lines with with this activity).

Body in the Group Lesson Plan During The Gingerbread Man Hunt

As we looked for the clues and walked to the new locations to find the next clue, students had to practice staying in the group. You would be amazed how hard this was for some of my students. During the activity, I had to pause as we walked to remind students who had their body in the group and who didn’t. We talked about how others could be feeling when people walked away from the group. Some perspectives you could share with your students are as follows:

  • The teachers worry that you will leave the group.
  • When your body is out of the group, other students will be annoyed that the class has to stop the hunt until your body is back in the group.
  • Teachers and students will think you aren’t interested in doing the hunt if your body leaves the group.
  • Students who walk ahead of the group might make others feel like you aren’t thinking about them. You are only worried about getting to the next location and not waiting for friends.
  • Students may be thinking, “Where is he/she going?”

What other perspectives/skills can you teach your students during this activity?

Work With Older Students and Need Holiday Therapy Resources?

I know a lot of times SLPs working with middle school and high school students struggle with finding themed resources that appeal to their students. The gingerbread man hunt, for example, is a great idea for the younger crowd. I was thinking you could try this same activity, but go on a hunt for a stash of snowballs. Not sure how your students would like it, but I know my middle school students in the mod-severe classrooms would probably get into that type of hunt. With my older students, I use YouTube videos from the Elf movie and Simon’s cat holiday/winter videos. These video clips are great for working on vocabulary, summarizing, perspective taking and predicting! And they are free, low prep and funny (this is the SLP’s dream). Check out those blog posts for how I use them and  to find links to some of the videos. Planning activities for your life skill classrooms? You can make sugar cookies with gingerbread cookie cutters to give to family or friends. Or, pick a gingerbread recipe and prepare the treat for school staff members.

What Holiday Activities Do You Use To Target Social Pragmatics And Body In The Group?

I would love to know what activities and lessons you plan using a winter or holiday theme to work on social pragmatic skills. Share in the comments or email me at feliceclark@thedabblingspeechie.com

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