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Books To Teach Summer Vocabulary In Speech Therapy

Books To Teach Summer Vocabulary In Speech Therapy

I love incorporating books into speech therapy. It is the easiest way for me to teach themed vocabulary without having to prep anything! Summer books are filled with picture scenes that have summer vocabulary to teach. I don’t think I could ever have enough books to teach summer vocabulary! #professionalbookhoarder

This blog post will walk you through the benefits of teaching vocabulary using summer-themed books and strategies for building better vocabulary with your students!

Why Using Summer-Themed Vocabulary Is Beneficial for Language Therapy

When working with students to improve their vocabulary, the research shows that focusing on building a deep vocabulary will help students learn new words because they can add those new words into a system or category a child knows well. There is also research that shows that students with language impairments need up to 36 engagements with a word before they learn it. So, as clinicians, implementing themed therapy can be a great approach to building a depth of knowledge for vocabulary. This gives us permission to use a summer theme for longer than a week because the more engagements with words, the better our students will learn a deep knowledge of that vocabulary.

Furthermore, if your teachers are also incorporating summer-themed books into their curriculum and daily class readings, we are helping to give more exposure and discussion with those words when our students come to the speech room. Plus, most students have experienced a summer season. By picking a theme that is relatable, it will help your students draw from their own experiences with the summer concepts and vocabulary. 

You can see some of the research articles at the end of this blog post that specifically look at vocabulary intervention. 

Books also provide way more opportunities for you to target other language skills, such as inference, predicting, grammar, articulation practice and carryover, story retell, and narrative comprehension. 

The cool thing about using a summer theme to plan therapy is that you can incorporate a new summer-themed book every 1-2 weeks. You will keep students engaged by reading a new story while still choosing a book that builds off of previously taught vocabulary. 

Strategies on How to Teach Vocabulary with Literature

To help your students build stronger vocabularies, here are some strategies you can use to teach vocabulary with literature:

Provide multiple exposures to words while reading the book and in activities. One study found that just hearing the target words helped build vocabulary.

Give explicit information about the words in the book or give kid-friendly definitions of unknown words. Picking out Tier II vocabulary words has been shown as the best way to build vocabulary. Bringing Words to Life is a great resource to learn more about Tier II vocabulary. You can use the story pictures to also show the vocabulary words.

Focus on teaching words and how they relate thematically, such as a word map, naming word associations, or talking about a word in a taxonomy. For example, when teaching a word thematically, such as with the word “beach,” you can word map clothes you bring, activities you enjoy at the beach, food you eat, things you see, how beach items feel/look, etc.

More Tips for Teaching Vocabulary

When building depth of knowledge using a taxonomy approach, you are deconstructing a word by category, sub-category, function, location, size, shape, texture, parts, etc. For example, with the word “popsicle,” you could explain that it is a food and/or that it is a type of cold dessert. A popsicle can be eaten, it melts, and it often comes on a stick. A popsicle is made up of ingredients that are blended together and frozen. You keep popsicles in a freezer until you want to eat one.

As you are reading the book, you can use dialogic reading techniques to facilitate language discussion around the words. After reading the book, you can set up play activities that are related to the book’s concepts and/or theme to encourage students to act out the concepts from the book. Sensory bins, pretend play, toys, or props for story retell can work great to engage your students. 

Summer Sub-Themes to Incorporate in Speech Therapy

When we think of summer, there are probably a variety of words and experiences you associate with that word. And, that might be different for you based on where you live in the world and what your students’ cultural values are surrounding summer.

Since I live in California, going to rivers, lakes, beaches, and/or swimming pools are activities many kids in my community enjoy on hot days. So, finding books with these topics are very relevant to my caseload. Other summer themes that resonate with students can be camping, Fourth of July, summer weather, going on vacation, ice cream, popsicles, lemonade stands, BBQs, nature hikes, bugs, ocean animals, waterslides, or just everyday summer activities, such as water balloons and bike rides. What other summer themes do you love to target?

If you need resources that help you plan extension activities with a summer theme, check these out from my blog and Teachers Pay Teachers store:

Camping Speech Therapy Activities

Summer Vocabulary and Grammar Activities for K-2

Camping Language Lesson Plan Guides for Small Group or Push-In Therapy for K-2

Ice Cream Language Lesson Plan Guides for Small Group or Push-In Therapy K-2

Beach Language Lesson Plan Guides for Small Group or Push-In Therapy K-2

Summer Language Lesson Plan Guides for Small Group or Push-In Therapy K-2

Ocean Language Lesson Plan Guides for Small Group or Push-In Therapy K-2

Books to Teach Summer Vocabulary for Camping

I have been so thankful to find resources on social media that share book recommendations and specifically diverse book recommendations. If you need some accounts to follow for books, I highly recommend following @havingoursay @diversereads 

They have top-notch recommendations and I got Jabari Reads from @diversereads

The Camping Trip by Jennifer K. Mann 

Ernestine is invited to go on her very first camping trip. Although she is excited and packed thoroughly for camping, Ernestine has to learn how to set up a tent and what it is like to be out in the wilderness. This is a great story about a little girl who has to navigate a new environment that brings challenges. Even though camping is, at times, uncomfortable for Ernestine, she learns how to make lasting memor

A Camping Spree with Mr. Magee by Chronicle Books

Camping is a favorite pastime for a lot of people during the summer months! A Camping Spree with Mr. Magee is a great book to teach about all those camping vocabulary words. It has  fun, vivid pictures; a bear; a camper; Mr. Magee; and his cute dog, Dee.

If you need camping resources to pair with this book, I have some fun camping activities, including a S’mores craftivity, in my Summer Craftivity Set! You can also make a fun lantern craft. Check out my tutorial for how to make a lantern by clicking the YouTube video (I know it is for Chinese New Year, but I use that craft for camping lanterns, too).

Books to Teach Summer Vocabulary at the Beach

When a Dragon Moves In by Jodi Moore

I love using When a Dragon Moves In to teach beach-themed vocabulary, to work on inferencing, and to work on perspective-taking. This book is all about a boy who is pretending that his sandcastle has a dragon inside it. He talks all about the things he does at the beach with the dragon. The boy’s family doesn’t seem to believe him when he tells them that it is the dragon who is eating the brownies and spraying sand at his sister. The pictures are very colorful, and it is a great book to discuss pretend versus real.

The Sandcastle Contest by Robert Munsch

If you want a book with a summer theme that is good for working on oral narration and story comprehension, The Sandcastle Contest  is a great book to work on those skills! This book is all about cool sandcastles, so it is a pretty engaging book for students. I have a buried in sand craftivity that would go great with this book!

Beach Day by Clarion Books

Beach Day is probably my most favorite beach-themed book! It is written with a rhyme sentence structure, so it isn’t that long of a book. Why I LOVE the book is because the pictures are filled with lots of people and activities that a person may do at the beach. It is great for teaching beach vocabulary, as well as for creating sentences about what the people are doing. I love that this could help with teaching word associations, and the visual supports are already built in with the book, so you don’t have to worry about preparing visuals for your lesson.

Summer Books to Build Vocabulary on Hot Days

Jabari Jumps by Gaia Cornwall

Jabari Jumps is a sweet tale about a young boy who is ready to jump off the diving board. Jabari has passed his swimming test and now has to figure out how he can overcome his fear of jumping off the diving board. Kids can relate to this book as many take swim lessons over the summer and also have fears of jumping off the diving board. You can also work on /dj/ when reading this story. 

Let It Shine by Maryann Cocca-Leffler

If you like to talk about a lot of different activities people do over the summer, then Let It Shine is the perfect book to read with your students. This book is great for answering themed wh- questions. They cover Fourth of July, baseball games, the beach, swimming, camping, and more in this book!

One Hot Summer Day by Nina Crews

This is a great book for Pre-K and kindergarten that talks about what happens during a big heat wave in the summer months. The book uses real photos, so children can relate to the words used about summer. For many children, hot summer days are just ordinary days filled with fans, popsicles, and trying to stay cool in the shade. 

The Night Before Summer Vacation by Natasha Wing

Lots of children go on vacation during the summer months. The Night Before Summer Vacation is a book that talks all about what happens the night before kids go on summer vacation.

Speech Therapy Resources with a Summer Theme

Paper Plate Gumball Craft for Speech Sound Disorders

Paper Plate Gumball Craft for Speech Sound Disorders

This paper plate craft is SUCH an easy way to target a variety of goals and skills in your speech room, including articulation, apraxia, and phonology disorder. It’s inexpensive, you probably already have a lot of the materials needed, and it’s a useful way to treat speech sound disorders. Plus, your students will love the gumball craft! To learn more about how to prep this craft (spoiler alert: it’s really easy!), keep reading.

How to Make the Paper Plate Gumball Craft

 

I love functional crafts that will achieve meaningful outcomes for my student’s progress on goals. And, I love crafts that are easy to prep! You don’t need much to make this gumball craft. Here are the supplies I used:

Amazon affiliate links are included for your convenience. I get a small commission when you purchase using this link. 

Have your students decorate their paper plate with circles using the dot markers. Cut out a red shape for the base of the gumball machine. Then, cut out a top to glue on the paper plate. Draw a black hole for the gumball slot or cut out a piece of black paper and glue on the base.

How many students on your caseload have speech sound disorders? If you have any at all, then you'll definitely want to learn more about this low-prep gumball craft. You probably already have most, if not all, of the materials it requires on hand, and it will help you target goals and skills like apraxia, phonology disorder, and articulation. To learn more about all the ways to use this craft in your speech therapy room, click through now! #speechandlanguagetherapy #SLP #speechtherapy #lowprep

Tips for How to Use the Paper Plate Gumball Craft with Speech Sound Disorders

Use the dot markers to keep your students engaged with their speech sound productions. Have your student decorate the paper plate with dots before creating the gumball craft. To make sure you get lots of repetitions in a session, you can have your students say their sound/word for every dot they make on the plate. Or, you can have your students drill five words/sounds per dot.

Sometimes, if my students struggle with waiting or if they take a long time to make dots, I will drill for 1-2 minutes and then let my students put 5-10 dots on the paper and repeat this until the paper plate is fully decorated.

How many students on your caseload have speech sound disorders? If you have any at all, then you'll definitely want to learn more about this low-prep gumball craft. You probably already have most, if not all, of the materials it requires on hand, and it will help you target goals and skills like apraxia, phonology disorder, and articulation. To learn more about all the ways to use this craft in your speech therapy room, click through now! #speechandlanguagetherapy #SLP #speechtherapy #lowprep
How many students on your caseload have speech sound disorders? If you have any at all, then you'll definitely want to learn more about this low-prep gumball craft. You probably already have most, if not all, of the materials it requires on hand, and it will help you target goals and skills like apraxia, phonology disorder, and articulation. To learn more about all the ways to use this craft in your speech therapy room, click through now! #speechandlanguagetherapy #SLP #speechtherapy #lowprep

Speech Sound Resources to Use with the Paper Plate Craft

If you are looking for articulation resources to use while getting those high trials, you can grab my articulation flipbooks. They include word lists, pictures, carrier phrases, and picture scenes for each sound. Use the L flipbook for FREE

For your students working on speech words at the word and structured sentence level, use my visual sentence starters to help your students get that repetitive practice while creating this craft.

If you need another paper plate craft for working on grammar skills, check out these ideas in this blog post HERE

Using Your Paper Plate Gumball Craft for Speech Sound Disorders

Once your student has decorated their plate, they can make their paper plate gumball craft. Don’t send the craft home with your student. Keep it for a couple of sessions as your warm-up. Have your student touch the dots on the gumball machine while practicing their sounds.

Or, flip the plate over and have your students write a list of their speech words that you want them to practice at home. You can use my Any Craft Companion Resource to have your friends glue some words to the back of the plate.

Send this craft home with your students for additional practice. You can direct your parents to put the craft on the front of the fridge. This will help remind both the parent and the student to practice the words on the back each day. 

How many students on your caseload have speech sound disorders? If you have any at all, then you'll definitely want to learn more about this low-prep gumball craft. You probably already have most, if not all, of the materials it requires on hand, and it will help you target goals and skills like apraxia, phonology disorder, and articulation. To learn more about all the ways to use this craft in your speech therapy room, click through now! #speechandlanguagetherapy #SLP #speechtherapy #lowprep
How many students on your caseload have speech sound disorders? If you have any at all, then you'll definitely want to learn more about this low-prep gumball craft. You probably already have most, if not all, of the materials it requires on hand, and it will help you target goals and skills like apraxia, phonology disorder, and articulation. To learn more about all the ways to use this craft in your speech therapy room, click through now! #speechandlanguagetherapy #SLP #speechtherapy #lowprep

I hope that this post gave you a variety of low-prep and easy, yet effective, ideas for treating speech sound disorders on your caseload. My speech students have loved this fun gumball craft, and there are so many different things you can do with it! If you do this craft with any of the students on your caseload, I’d love to hear how you adapted it to fit their needs. Comment here on this blog post or email me at feliceclark@thedabblingspeechie.com.

FREE ‘I Spy’ Language Game for Parents

FREE ‘I Spy’ Language Game for Parents

With school closures happening around the nation it is extremely stressful for parents to educate their children at home. One way you can help your children work on language at home is by playing games. This ‘I Spy’ language game is engaging because it allows your child to move around and there are a lot of ways you can work on your child’s speech and language goals.

For speech therapists trying to figure out lesson plans for an entire caseload, this activity can help you give actionable therapy ideas because the free parent lesson plan includes ways to use this one activity to target a wide-variety of goals.

You can coach your parents each week with how to adapt this game to build vocabulary.

How to Play the ‘I Spy’ Language Game

'I Spy' language game to use to build vocabulary while homeschooling.

Directions for activity: Print the ‘I Spy’ check-off sheet and give it to your child. Have them go around the house looking for different items that are in the category groups or noun-functions. Once your child finds an item, they can check it off. If the things are small, your child can put them in a box or container as they see the item. Your child is finished with the ‘I Spy’ game when they have spotted everything on the list. If you have multiple children at home, you can break them up into teams to see who can finish the list first. They can look for these items in their toys, rooms of the house, or in their yards.

How the ‘I Spy’ Language Game Will Build Vocabulary

The research continues to show that children build stronger vocabularies when they build a depth of knowledge with a word. This means when they attach several associations with the word, they will have a stronger understanding of what that word means. So, when we work on attaching category groups to words, it helps children understanding how words go together. This is a handy skill for word finding, explaining similiarities and differences and organizing language. Check out this blog post about categories HERE.

At home, you can play this ‘I Spy’ language game to work on categories and noun-functions while also working on articulation, speech fluency, social skills, grammar, and vocabulary. It will help you feel confident that you are engaging your child in a low-tech educational game that is helping them grow.

There are also strong links to building vocabulary and reading comprehension. So, even though your child isn’t practicing reading they are building foundational skills that will help them with understanding what they are reading. 

'I Spy' language game to build vocabulary at home and work on other speech and language goals. This speech activity can be used to help coach parents during distance learning.

Coaching Parents on How to Use This Game

'I Spy' language game to help parents work on speech and language goals from home during distance learning.

For SLPs that are trying to provide lesson plans for their caseload, this free download will help you plan easily.

You can send this home with parents and include the parent lesson plan. It shows all the different skills they can target, so you can guide your families based on your students goals.

This activity can be played many times, so encourage your families to not just play once! Coach them with how to adapt this game to continue to work on their child’s goal. Or, show your families easy ways to extend the activity. For example, after the child plays the ‘I Spy’ Language game, give the parents tips for teaching how to compare/contrast two items in a category group.

Make sure to download this free lesson plan by clicking the pink button below. 

Speech and Language Skills to Target with ‘I Spy’ Language at Home

Articulation – have your child find items that have their sound. Then, have them practice the word 10x with their correct sound production. Make a silly story with the items using their best sounds!

Vocabulary – compare and contrast two items in that category group by how they are similar and different.

Grammar – create sentences by adding in an adjective about the item or talking about “where” the item belongs such as “A pillow belongs on top of my bed.”

Social Skills – work on having your child initiate questions and comments. Model social language during this activity. Give pause time to see if your child will nonverbally or verbally initiate a message.

Speech Fluency- have your child practice their strategies when saying the things they found or when using the item in a sentence. 

Oral Narration – Have your child create a story about one of the items they found. Or, make up a story with all the items!

Your kids will be having FUN while they are learning. As much as we want our kids to be diligently working on worksheets and math problems, your kids need activities that will inspire them. Let me know how it goes by tagging me on Instagram: @thedabblingspeechie

‘I Spy’ Speech Therapy Home Packets for you K-2 caseload

'I Spy' Speech Therapy home packets to support students with distance learning. Use this 'I Spy' around the home to build speech and language skills.
'I Spy' language game for parents to use with distance learning in speech therapy. Coach parents each week with a new type of game.
'I Spy' around the home speech therapy game for parents to use during distance learning.

If you love the idea of sending home movement types of speech and language resources during school closures, then this extended ‘I Spy’ Speech Therapy Home Packets will serve your students well. This full version has additional types of games such as ‘I Spy’ colors, shapes, adjectives, outdoors, rooms of the house, categories, and noun-functions. There are visual supports for your students with Autism or significant language impairments, so they can participate with more success using this game. 

'I Spy' speech therapy game to send home to students. Each game set has parent handouts to guide the parents through the activity as well as ideas for ways to expand the game to work on speech goals.

Click the image above if you need a resource that is easy to prep for a bulk of your caseload, engaging for kids, and makes coaching parents a breeze during this stressful time. You don’t need to add more work to your plate to create customized lessons when you have this resource in your speech therapy stash! 

Free Daily Home Visual Schedule

Free Daily Home Visual Schedule

Many of our students with Autism need visual supports to help navigate their day. When we create routines and visually show them what is happening next, it creates a calm for our students. One thing SLPs can do to help support parents at home is to create these daily home visual schedules to send home with students. Scroll down to the pink button to grab this free daily home schedule.  (Amazon affiliate links are included for your convenience in this blog post.) I receive a small compensation for any purchases through those links.)

A lot of my students benefit from having a visual schedule, a first/then chart and a working for chart. That can be a lot of visuals to carry around, so I put them all on one sheet of paper. It can also be helpful for some children to only see a few activities at a time instead of the whole schedule at once. To grab this free schedule, click the pink button and enter in your email information. You will then get an email with your free daily home schedule.

 

It includes premade picture icons, tokens, and blank icon pages, so you can store those icons when they are not being used. There is an editable PDF that will allow you to make custom pictures for your student/child that have real photos of their bed, toys, and home or to add in different pictures that relate to your student or child’s daily routine.

Supplies to Make Your Daily Home Schedule

Use this free daily home schedule to create a visual schedule for your child that will help them navigate the day so there is less tantrums throughout the day and more productive interactions!

Here are the supplies you will need to make your daily home visual schedule:

 

Velcro Dots

White Cardstock

Binder Rings

Laminating Sheets

You will print out the main visual support and laminate it. Then, you will print out the 3 icon strips for morning, afternoon and evening. Laminate those sheets along with the premade icons. Print out the blank morning, afternoon, and evening activity sheets to put your premade icons. Once you have everything prepped, hole punch all the sheets and attach using the binder rings. There are more specific directions in the free download.

 

Need a daily home schedule for your child with Autism. Grab this free visual schedule to help your child navigate the day with ease!

I hope this was helpful for your home. Please reach out and share how it is working. You can find me on social media @thedabblingspeechie or you can email me at feliceclark@thedabblingspeechie.com

I always love to hear how I can support SLPs and the parents of their students with visual supports and engaging materials to help your children/students make progress with speech and language skills.

10 Ways to Use Play Food in Speech Therapy

10 Ways to Use Play Food in Speech Therapy

What’s more fun to young kids than playing with toy food items? They love using play food to engage in activities like playing house. Harness that interest for your speech therapy sessions! This is why toy food sets can be so engaging for our speech students! These play food items allow students to interact with you and do pretend play, all the while allowing you to work on a variety of different speech and language skills with them. I’m sharing 10 skills you can focus on with toy foods below, so keep reading to get all of my suggestions!

Play food is SUCH a big hit with young children. Why not give them space to play with toy food items while also working on essential speech and language skills? Play food sets make for a fantastic addition to your speech therapy materials. Kids love playing with toy food, and you can work on targets like sequencing, CORE vocabulary, AAC, grammar concepts, and more. Click through to read this post to learn 10 ways that play food can be used in speech therapy! #speechtherapy #SLPs #speechskills

Where Can I Buy Play Food for My Speech Room?

There are a few different play food options available online. One of them is even from Melissa and Doug, so you don’t have to worry about the quality of those items! All of the ones I’m suggesting below can be found on Amazon, but you might be able to find them at stores like Target, too. The links below are Amazon affiliate links for your convenience.

Melissa & Doug Food Groups

Pantry in a Bucket by Play Circle Battat (This is a good deal!)

New Sprouts Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner by Learning Resources

 

Play food is SUCH a big hit with young children. Why not give them space to play with toy food items while also working on essential speech and language skills? Play food sets make for a fantastic addition to your speech therapy materials. Kids love playing with toy food, and you can work on targets like sequencing, CORE vocabulary, AAC, grammar concepts, and more. Click through to read this post to learn 10 ways that play food can be used in speech therapy! #speechtherapy #SLPs #speechskills

Build Vocabulary While Using Play Food in Speech Therapy

You can use play food to compare and contrast items by attribute features. While you are playing with the food, you can discuss the different category groups for food items, function, size, shape, color, where you buy/store it, what meals you use the food for, parts and textures. I love using my visual sentence frames to help my students explain similarities and differences between foods. 

For your students not ready to work expressively with comparing and contrasting, have your students “sort” food into different groups. For example, you can sort chewy vs. crunchy foods, hot vs. cold, sweet vs. sour foods.

Being able to see and touch the play food while doing this language activity makes it engaging for your students too!

Play food is SUCH a big hit with young children. Why not give them space to play with toy food items while also working on essential speech and language skills? Play food sets make for a fantastic addition to your speech therapy materials. Kids love playing with toy food, and you can work on targets like sequencing, CORE vocabulary, AAC, grammar concepts, and more. Click through to read this post to learn 10 ways that play food can be used in speech therapy! #speechtherapy #SLPs #speechskills

How to Use Play Food in Speech Therapy

A toy food set can be used to target so many speech and language skills! Listed below are some of my favorite ways to engage children in these skills:

  1. Have one student prepare a meal for another student. One student can practice his/her articulation, vocabulary, grammar while telling the student what to do to prepare the meal.
  2. Sequence the steps for setting a table, cleaning the kitchen, shopping at the grocery store, or making a meal. Sequence how to make a hamburger, sandwich, cake, etc.
  3. Following directions and basic concepts with the food and utensils.
  4. Sort food by sub-categories: desserts, fruit, vegetables, breakfast, dinner, meat, etc. Then, describe the food by attributes (size, shape, colors, parts, texture, etc.)
  5. Work on “who” and “where” questions. Give different food items to students and ask, “Who has a brownie?”
  6. Asking and answering wh-questions while playing with the food.
  7. Play pretend restaurant to work on social skills, articulation carryover, and language.
  8. Plan a dinner party or birthday party.
  9. Practice manners while eating.
  10. Work on inferencing by giving the kids clues about the food item and they have to guess the food.

Need a cheat sheet guide to help you with targeting wh- questions, Tier II vocabulary, articulation, basic concepts, adjectives, and helpful therapy ideas for toys you use during play-based therapy? Grab this Toy Companion Cheat Sheet Guide for Pre-K to 2nd grade and have stimulus targets mapped out for fourteen different toys.

Share How You Use Play Food Toy Set

Do you have a fun way to engage your students with play food in speech therapy? Share in the comments, tag me on Instagram @thedabblingspeechie, or email me at feliceclark@thedabblingspeechie.com.

Gingerbread Man Speech Therapy Activities

Gingerbread Man Speech Therapy Activities

Do you love using The Gingerbread Man story in your therapy sessions? It is great for teaching oral narration and language skills.

Over the years, I have even found ways to incorporate social pragmatic skills with a gingerbread man theme. 

Today, I wanted to share some gingerbread man speech therapy activities you can do with your students in December or January.

Gingerbread Man Speech Therapy Activities

You can work on oral narration and comprehension using the book The Gingerbread Man. Another way to build language is to compare and contrast different versions of The Gingerbread Man.

Here are some book versions that you can use in therapy (Amazon affiliate links included):

Gingerbread Baby by Jan Brett

The Gingerbread Man by Gail Yerill

The Gingerbread Girl by Lisa Campbell Ernst

The Gingerbread Man is Loose in the School by Laura Murray

After reading the story, you can work on word opposites such as hungry/full, fast/slow, go/stop, wet/dry, shallow/deep.

As a group, you can target the tier II vocabulary of chase, stream, and gobble.

You can discuss kitchen utensils and things that people can bake. 

Review each picture in the story and work on grammar concepts while retelling the story. 

 

Use these gingerbread man speech therapy activities to target lots lots of language and social skills. #slpeeps #speechies #socialskills #speechtherapy #gingerbreadman #preschoolslp #preschool #languageintervention #slp2b #cfyslp

Gingerbread Man Activities for Mixed Groups

gingerbread man speech therapy activities that you can do to work on language and social skills. #slpeeps #schoolslp #speechtherapy #gingerbreadman #cfyslp #slp2b #languagetherapy #eslteacher #socialpragmatics

You can use gingerbread man cookies to work on so many functional language skills. Have your students decorate gingerbread man cookies to work on CORE vocabulary, requesting, commenting and sequencing. I found these different sized cookie cutters, so we also worked on big, bigger, and biggest. Students working on articulation carryover can practice their speech sounds while explaining how they decorated their gingerbread man cookie.

Need ideas for how to use cookies to work on perspective taking? Check out this blog post HERE.

When using a task card deck with your mixed groups, you can make the deck more engaging by planning the “Catch the gingerbread man” game. All you need are gingerbread men, some fox printables, paper clips and a magnetic wand. Attach gingerbread men to most of the task cards. Put a few foxes under the cards. Then, students pick a card with the magnetic wand. If it has a gingerbread man, they get to keep it. If it has a fox, then they lose a card. Grab these free printables HERE. 

Gingerbread Man Brain Break Activities

For your students that need movement to help them stay engaged, I highly recommend these YouTube videos as fun brain breaks.

This allows your students a quick time to get their wiggles out while still moving their bodies to something related to The Gingerbread Man theme.

The second YouTube video puts some verbs from the story in song form which may help some of your students with learning that vocabulary.

I love incorporating YouTube videos into my whole class push-in lessons to break up the session. 

 

Visual Supports for Story Retell

To work on story retell using The Gingerbread Man, use file folder activities to help scaffold oral narration.

Some of your students may need step by step visual supports with what happened in the story. Use the file folders in my TPT store to plan leveled activities for your students.

You may have some students with complex communication needs and need additional supports to help them demonstrate their comprehension of the story. You can have your students match characters or story elements if they can’t verbally sequence the story. 

For students working on increasing MLU, have them use the visual sentence frames to build sentences about “who” was chasing the gingerbread man.

Work on story retell using visual supports in a sensory bin. You can check out how I made a gingerbread man sensory bin HERE.

It includes free printables to make your own gingerbread man sensory bin.

Gingerbread Man Activities for Body in the Group

The gingerbread man loves to be chased. And, it seems to be quite hard to catch him. Planning a body in the group gingerbread man chase around campus can be a practical way for you to work on staying with a group and thinking about others.

Check out this blog post to see how you can plan a gingerbread man hunt and work on social pragmatics as a whole class. I used a free printable to make this activity come to life!

 

Gingerbread Man Push-In Lesson Plan Ideas

When I plan push-in lessons for my K-1 and 1-2 Special Day Classrooms, I like to read a story book at the carpet and do a Google Slide presentation as a group.

Then, the class breaks up into three smaller group work stations. I plan three activities that align with theme of the week and use the teacher and aides to help with running stations. To see how I setup my push-in lessons, head to this blog post. If you are interested in learning about different collaborative service models, head to this blog post.

At the stations, you can plan an easy craft, use the characters from the story to work on prepositions while playing “Simon says”, and a pretend play gingerbread man cookie baking station to work on language and social skills in a functional way.

 

If you are needing lesson plan guides that will help you implement small group and whole class lessons, check out my gingerbread man push-in guides. It has 3-5 small group activities, book suggestions, a letter to send home to parents, a Google Slide presentation and cheat sheet guides for the teacher aides. Grab this resource and finally feel confident with structuring your therapy sessions. 

These are the activities you can do with a gingerbread man theme. What do you plan for your students? Share in the comments!

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