FREE ‘I Spy’ Language Game for Parents

FREE ‘I Spy’ Language Game for Parents

With school closures happening around the nation it is extremely stressful for parents to educate their children at home. One way you can help your children work on language at home is by playing games. This ‘I Spy’ language game is engaging because it allows your child to move around and there are a lot of ways you can work on your child’s speech and language goals.

For speech therapists trying to figure out lesson plans for an entire caseload, this activity can help you give actionable therapy ideas because the free parent lesson plan includes ways to use this one activity to target a wide-variety of goals.

You can coach your parents each week with how to adapt this game to build vocabulary.

How to Play the ‘I Spy’ Language Game

'I Spy' language game to use to build vocabulary while homeschooling.

Directions for activity: Print the ‘I Spy’ check-off sheet and give it to your child. Have them go around the house looking for different items that are in the category groups or noun-functions. Once your child finds an item, they can check it off. If the things are small, your child can put them in a box or container as they see the item. Your child is finished with the ‘I Spy’ game when they have spotted everything on the list. If you have multiple children at home, you can break them up into teams to see who can finish the list first. They can look for these items in their toys, rooms of the house, or in their yards.

How the ‘I Spy’ Language Game Will Build Vocabulary

The research continues to show that children build stronger vocabularies when they build a depth of knowledge with a word. This means when they attach several associations with the word, they will have a stronger understanding of what that word means. So, when we work on attaching category groups to words, it helps children understanding how words go together. This is a handy skill for word finding, explaining similiarities and differences and organizing language. Check out this blog post about categories HERE.

At home, you can play this ‘I Spy’ language game to work on categories and noun-functions while also working on articulation, speech fluency, social skills, grammar, and vocabulary. It will help you feel confident that you are engaging your child in a low-tech educational game that is helping them grow.

There are also strong links to building vocabulary and reading comprehension. So, even though your child isn’t practicing reading they are building foundational skills that will help them with understanding what they are reading. 

'I Spy' language game to build vocabulary at home and work on other speech and language goals. This speech activity can be used to help coach parents during distance learning.

Coaching Parents on How to Use This Game

'I Spy' language game to help parents work on speech and language goals from home during distance learning.

For SLPs that are trying to provide lesson plans for their caseload, this free download will help you plan easily.

You can send this home with parents and include the parent lesson plan. It shows all the different skills they can target, so you can guide your families based on your students goals.

This activity can be played many times, so encourage your families to not just play once! Coach them with how to adapt this game to continue to work on their child’s goal. Or, show your families easy ways to extend the activity. For example, after the child plays the ‘I Spy’ Language game, give the parents tips for teaching how to compare/contrast two items in a category group.

Make sure to download this free lesson plan by clicking the pink button below. 

Speech and Language Skills to Target with ‘I Spy’ Language at Home

Articulation – have your child find items that have their sound. Then, have them practice the word 10x with their correct sound production. Make a silly story with the items using their best sounds!

Vocabulary – compare and contrast two items in that category group by how they are similar and different.

Grammar – create sentences by adding in an adjective about the item or talking about “where” the item belongs such as “A pillow belongs on top of my bed.”

Social Skills – work on having your child initiate questions and comments. Model social language during this activity. Give pause time to see if your child will nonverbally or verbally initiate a message.

Speech Fluency- have your child practice their strategies when saying the things they found or when using the item in a sentence. 

Oral Narration – Have your child create a story about one of the items they found. Or, make up a story with all the items!

Your kids will be having FUN while they are learning. As much as we want our kids to be diligently working on worksheets and math problems, your kids need activities that will inspire them. Let me know how it goes by tagging me on Instagram: @thedabblingspeechie

Free Daily Home Visual Schedule

Free Daily Home Visual Schedule

Many of our students with Autism need visual supports to help navigate their day. When we create routines and visually show them what is happening next, it creates a calm for our students. One thing SLPs can do to help support parents at home is to create these daily home visual schedules to send home with students. Scroll down to the pink button to grab this free daily home schedule.  (Amazon affiliate links are included for your convenience in this blog post.) I receive a small compensation for any purchases through those links.)

A lot of my students benefit from having a visual schedule, a first/then chart and a working for chart. That can be a lot of visuals to carry around, so I put them all on one sheet of paper. It can also be helpful for some children to only see a few activities at a time instead of the whole schedule at once. To grab this free schedule, click the pink button and enter in your email information. You will then get an email with your free daily home schedule.

 

It includes premade picture icons, tokens, and blank icon pages, so you can store those icons when they are not being used. There is an editable PDF that will allow you to make custom pictures for your student/child that have real photos of their bed, toys, and home or to add in different pictures that relate to your student or child’s daily routine.

Supplies to Make Your Daily Home Schedule

Use this free daily home schedule to create a visual schedule for your child that will help them navigate the day so there is less tantrums throughout the day and more productive interactions!

Here are the supplies you will need to make your daily home visual schedule:

 

Velcro Dots

White Cardstock

Binder Rings

Laminating Sheets

You will print out the main visual support and laminate it. Then, you will print out the 3 icon strips for morning, afternoon and evening. Laminate those sheets along with the premade icons. Print out the blank morning, afternoon, and evening activity sheets to put your premade icons. Once you have everything prepped, hole punch all the sheets and attach using the binder rings. There are more specific directions in the free download.

 

Need a daily home schedule for your child with Autism. Grab this free visual schedule to help your child navigate the day with ease!

I hope this was helpful for your home. Please reach out and share how it is working. You can find me on social media @thedabblingspeechie or you can email me at feliceclark@thedabblingspeechie.com

I always love to hear how I can support SLPs and the parents of their students with visual supports and engaging materials to help your children/students make progress with speech and language skills.

Real Talk SLP episode 10

As a school-based SLP, we have to assess and treat a wide range of speech and language disorders across many different ages. That is a tough job! It’s hard to stay up to date with best practices for treating all these areas especially when you haven’t had a lot of experience with specific treatment areas. So, when you get a student with a disorder that you aren’t as confident with treating, it can feel a bit overwhelming. In this episode, I talk all about how I pushed through treating a student with apraxia after not having a child with this type of disorder on my caseload (13 years in and this was my first case.) Even though I attended professional development over the years about apraxia, the information doesn’t really “stick” until you have a client/child to apply that knowledge into practice.

Sponsors: Get The Marshalla Guide for 15% off with the code: dabblingspeechie

This resource has everything you need to reference how to teach speech sound disorders and articulation deficits.

In the Indiana area July 18th? Come to a practical professional development with the Speech Retreat. Grab your ticket here and invest in your SLP skills. You will leave the training feeling more confident with how to run therapy groups because the day is jam-packed with practical therapy ideas you can do on Monday morning.

In this episode, I share all about how I stopped feeling overwhelmed and started moving into that confidence SLP zone. And, I shared some resources that will help you build your skills so that you can serve your students well that have apraxia. Here is a training a mentioned in the podcast episode that is free:

Childhood Apraxia of Speech by Edythe Stand 

Other Trainings:

PROMPT Training

Resources for Apraxia Therapy:

Bjorem Speech Sound Cue Cards

Kaufman Treatment Praxia Kit

Facebook Groups that can answer your questions:

Pediatric SLP

Dabbling with Speech Fun

Preschool SLPs

Sound Activities for Kids to Use in Push-In Therapy

Sound Activities for Kids to Use in Push-In Therapy

For the month of March, my special day class teachers are using sound and light as their theme for language arts. We use the Unique Curriculum every month and the month of March has sound activities for kids. Using the Unique Curriculum helps the teacher and I plan push-in lessons because it includes stories and modified activities, so you can easily differentiate for the students academic and communication needs. Today, I wanted to show you how you can create your own sound activities for kids that can be used in small groups and whole-class instruction.

Amazon affiliate links are included in this blog post for your convenience. When you click on a link and purchase an item, I get a small commission without any cost to you. 

Planning for the Sound Speech Therapy Lesson

The Push-In set up for my self contained K-1 and 1-2 classrooms are to teach a whole class lesson using literacy and discussing the theme of the week with visuals and a Google Slide presentation. We do this for about 20 minutes. Then, we break up into small group stations that I and the teachers run for about 10 minutes in length.

This allows the students to engage in different language topics at three different stations, which makes for more meaningful practice. This also helps get your students academic ready meaning they are learning to stay seated in a chair, transition to new activities and practicing the correct voice volume at a station table. For those of you feeling overwhelmed with managing behaviors in small groups and whole class, head to this blog post. It has a lot of helpful tips!

If you need visual supports to help teach behavior expectations and rules, these visuals will help increase positive behaviors with less verbal reminders. 

For more information about how to setup push-in lessons for your students, check out this blog post. If you are wondering about

Here are some great sound activities for kids that you can use in your small group and push-in lessons as a speech therapist. Want to have activities that support your Unique curriculum? Check out this blog post to get sound activities to teach science, vocabulary and descriptive language.

YouTube Videos of Sound Activity for Kids to Use for Whole Class or Small Group Instruction

Here are some great sound activities for kids that you can use in your small group and push-in lessons as a speech therapist. Want to have activities that support your Unique curriculum? Check out this blog post to get sound activities to teach science, vocabulary and descriptive language.

On YouTube, there are two really great videos to work on identifying noises and sounds. You can have your students ‘guess’ what is making the sound. And, after the guess is revealed, you can work on answering ‘Where’ you would hear that sound or ‘Who’ makes that sound. Use visual sentence frames to have students explain who makes the sound such as, “The cow makes a ‘moo’ sound. You can also have students identify if the sound is quiet or loud.

One thing I recommend using is a software called SafeTube. It allows you to copy and paste the YouTube video link and creates a safe link to view the video. This way you aren’t getting inappropriate ads or popups that are not appropriate for students to view.

The animal sounds game is perfect for your younger students.  The “Guess the Sound” YouTube video has a variety of sounds in the environment and would be best for younger and older students. 

Books About Sound to Use for Speech Therapy

You can use a book to introduce the topic of sounds as a whole class or use the book during one of the station rotations. As a whole class, we used the story from the Unique Curriculum. It is great on a SMARTboard because you can tap the page and it will read it out-loud to the students while highlighting each word. If you do not have this N2Y subscription, I listed some books you can use. Check out the Station 3 book too. My students loved it! You can still get it on Amazon even though it appears that Usborne does not sell “Who’s Making That Noise?”

Here are some other books you can use in therapy that talk about sounds:

Sounds All Around by Wendy Pfeffer

Sound: Loud, Soft, High, and Low (Amazing Science) by Natalie Myra Rosinsky

Encyclopedia Britannica Kids – Animal Sound Treasury Book – PI Kids (Play-A-Sound) by Phoenix International Publications

Mr. Brown Can Moo, Can You? By Dr. Seuss

We’re Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen

Here are some great sound activities for kids that you can use in your small group and push-in lessons as a speech therapist. Want to have activities that support your Unique curriculum? Check out this blog post to get sound activities to teach science, vocabulary and descriptive language.

Sound Activity for Station 1 Rotation

 

The special education teacher had these tin canisters from the Dollar Tree and filled them with different items that make noise. Each of the students took a turn shaking one of the containers. They listened to the sound and made a guess about what the sound could be. Your students can also describe the sound as either quiet or loud with this activity. The students were very engaged and excited to find out what was in the containers. You can work on CORE vocabulary for “open”, “more,” “like/don’t like”, “loud” and “quiet.” You can also find them on Amazon HERE.

Here are some great sound activities for kids that you can use in your small group and push-in lessons as a speech therapist. Want to have activities that support your Unique curriculum? Check out this blog post to get sound activities to teach science, vocabulary and descriptive language.
Here are some great sound activities for kids that you can use in your small group and push-in lessons as a speech therapist. Want to have activities that support your Unique curriculum? Check out this blog post to get sound activities to teach science, vocabulary and descriptive language.

Sound Activity for Station 2 Rotation

For another station, you could use one of the ‘Guess the Sound’ YouTube videos and work in a small group. Or, you can do a sound charades game where students take turns imitating the sounds/noises of different items, nature, appliances, and animals. While you are making the sounds, you can cover yes/no questions by asking, “Is this sound quiet?” or “Is this a lion?”

Grab this activity by clicking the pink button. It is a free download to use in your therapy room.

Sound Activity for Station 3 Rotation

 

Grab a good book that talks about sound. I really love the Usborne Lift a Flap Book for “Who’s Making that Noise?” by Jenny Tyler and Philip Hawthorn. I don’t think Usbourne sells this series anymore. But, the kids loved talking about the noises the animals were making. It was perfect for open/close, answering “what”, “where”, and “who” questions as well as teaching the CORE vocabulary of “no/not.” This book has repetitive lines and one of them is “Who’s making that noise? Is it those noisy boys? It’s NOT us.”

Here are some great sound activities for kids that you can use in your small group and push-in lessons as a speech therapist. Want to have activities that support your Unique curriculum? Check out this blog post to get sound activities to teach science, vocabulary and descriptive language.

Grab this free sound charade visual activity with visual sentence starters. I love using visual sentence frames to help my students generate more novel utterances. If you are an elementary SLP and tired of scribbling out sentence frames on post-it notes, then grab my entire visual sentence starters to use with ANY lesson and with a variety of goals.

What Sound Activities for Kids Do You Love to Use?

Working on identifying sounds in your speech sessions can be really engaging because your students use their hearing to navigate the world around them. When we find themes that are relevant to our students’ environment, they tend to have more to say about the topic. The staff and myself noticed a lot more comments and initiation of communication with this theme. What sound activities or materials have you used with your students? Let me know in the comments. 

Lucky Green Sensory Bin for Speech Therapy

Lucky Green Sensory Bin for Speech Therapy

Do you need an activity for St. Patrick’s Day that will cover lots of goals and be adaptable for many ages? I have just the sensory bin for you! This lucky green sensory bin is easy to make and will be great for your younger students and older ones too. Don’t you love it when you have materials that can be used across a lot of ages? This lucky green sensory bin will help you implement engaging therapy during the crazy month of March when all the paperwork is due.

I started using festive St. Patrick’s Day sensory bins many years ago and this lucky green sensory bin is still a hit. Check out this post for more March bin ideas. 

How to Make a Lucky Green Sensory Bin

All you need is a bin, some shredded green paper and green items from around your speech room. If you need more ideas for what types of bins to use, head to this blog post.

For my lucky green sensory bin, I used the following items (Amazon Affiliate links are included for your convenience. I get a small commission when you use these links):

Aluminum Pan (these make great sensory bin containers)

Shredded green wrapping paper from the Dollar Tree or green grass for Easter baskets

-Green toys and items from around my room

If you need ideas for green items, I grabbed vegetables and fruit from my play food, cars, insects, green cups, green markers and crayons, play money, green toy clothing items, or items from your Alphabet Sounds Tubs from Lakeshore Learning. I would love to know what green items you have found, so I can grab materials to add in my future lucky green sensory bins. You can also head to the Dollar Tree and find items that are green too.

Need an activity to cover mixed groups for St. Patrick’s Day? Go around your speech room and find your green toys and items. Throw them in a sensory bin and now you have the perfect speech and language sensory bin. Use this lucky green sensory bin to target grammar, vocabulary, describing, and articulation and phonology.

Can You Find It? Lucky Green Sensory Bin Activity

One activity that I love to play to work on noun-functions is my Can You Find It? Game. I put items in the bin and then give clues to my students. Can you find something that you eat? Or, Can you find something that you wear?

Because I don’t have a TON of real items, I made a sensory bin activity using different green items. It includes visual supports, and visual sentence frames to work on describing the items. If you need this activity, head to my TPT store. You won’t regret having a sensory bin companion that will last you the whole month of March (lesson plans are finished, so you can focus on therapy without the stress.)

See the pictures below to check out some of the items and visuals included in this resource. 

Ways to Use the Green Sensory Bin

Need an activity to cover mixed groups for St. Patrick’s Day? Go around your speech room and find your green toys and items. Throw them in a sensory bin and now you have the perfect speech and language sensory bin. Use this lucky green sensory bin to target grammar, vocabulary, describing, and articulation and phonology.
Need an activity to cover mixed groups for St. Patrick’s Day? Go around your speech room and find your green toys and items. Throw them in a sensory bin and now you have the perfect speech and language sensory bin. Use this lucky green sensory bin to target grammar, vocabulary, describing, and articulation and phonology.

You can use this bin to cover your speech and language goals in therapy. For articulation and speech sound students, they can hunt for items with their speech sound. Have your students hide an item in the green grass after they produce their target sound 5 times.

For your students working on grammar and syntax, work on naming the items with a plural tense marker. Or, have them create sentences with adjectives, prepositional phrases, and the correct noun-verb agreement.

This green sensory bin has so many opportunities for building vocabulary. Have your students describe the items in the bin by attributes. Or, have them look for items in specific category groups. Work on answering wh- questions while using the items. You can cover “yes/no” questions and “Who, What, Where, When, and Why” questions.

For articulation carryover, have your students create a silly story using the items in the green bin. This can work with well with your language students too. You can have them work on story retell and oral narration.

How would you use this bin in therapy? Leave a comment below and share your therapy ideas! Sharing an idea may help another SLP with using this bin.

 

Are you looking for more St. Patrick’s Day themed ideas? Head to this blog post and your lesson planning will be a breeze!!

Need More Sensory Bin Ideas

If you are wanting to use more sensory bins during March, head to this blog post for other sensory bins you can make. You can also plan some spring sensory bins by heading to this blog post.

Make sure you download my FREE ultimate sensory bin guide (click the pink button above to grab) and make a fun baby chick sensory bin. If you head to this blog post, you can make a chicken inferencing sensory bin activity (it’s a free download on that post.)

I am always looking for sensory bin inspiration and I am sure other SLPs are too. You can share your sensory bins on Instagram using the #slpsensorybin hashtag. If you are looking for new ideas, I recommend following that hashtag to get sensory bin updates in your feed.

Need an activity to cover mixed groups for St. Patrick’s Day? Go around your speech room and find your green toys and items. Throw them in a sensory bin and now you have the perfect speech and language sensory bin. Use this lucky green sensory bin to target grammar, vocabulary, describing, and articulation and phonology.