Setting Up Articulation Speech Folders For Students

Setting Up Articulation Speech Folders For Students

Recently, I polled the SLPs that follow me on Instagram to see how many of us make individual student folders for our caseloads. It was a pretty even 50/50 split of speech pathologists that do make individual folders and those that don’t.

I personally do not make individual speech folders for each child on my caseload. I use a giant therapy binder that has tabs for each child on my caseload. If I cover two schools, then I store a therapy binder at each school. 

Setting Up Articulation Speech Folders

For each student, I store their therapy logs, a communication log, their IEP-at-a-glance, and specialized data sheets as needed. Typically, I just flip back and forth between students to keep everything documented. 

However, I always have certain students that I service in a quick artic model, or I want to have some specialized visuals organized for my artic students to use when running mixed groups. In these circumstances, I will make an articulation speech folder for the individual student or the particular sound/phonological process. Today, I am going to share how you can set up your own articulation speech folders to help you streamline your therapy planning process.

Why I Make Articulation Speech Folders

Let’s face it. We have limited time for planning therapy. And sometimes we are doing our quick artic in the hallways or targeting articulation goals with mixed groups. It is hard for me to keep visuals, homework sheets, flash cards, etc. organized for my articulation students. Having all of the tools I may need in one speech folder helps me to be prepared for therapy. Planning therapy is less stressful because I can grab the folder knowing that everything I need is ready to use.

Or, if I have 3-4 students working on a certain phonological process, I can make one folder for that process and have all the speech materials I need to remediate that process. The only other thing I may need to grab is a toy, a game, or a manipulative to use with all the tools in the speech folder. 

 

Materials to Make Articulation Speech Folders

To make your speech folder, you do need some organizational materials to make it work. I am going to show you what I do, but feel free to adapt for your caseload. Amazon affiliate links are included for your convenience.

What other office supplies have you found helpful to include in your student’s speech folders? Share in the comments!

What to Include in Your Articulation Speech Folder

When setting up your articulation speech folder, you want to have an idea of where the child is performing with learning his/her sound. If the child is at the syllable level, then you can include materials and visuals for that level, as well as add in materials for the word and phrase level.

Grab these FREE Articulation Syllable Practice Sheets in my TPT store. 

This allows you to have extra materials ready in the event that the student progresses quicker than you expected. You will be ready to adapt the therapy session easily without racking your brain on what to do next.

Here are some helpful things to include in your speech folder:

-Therapy logs (I use the logs from The Speech Bubble SLP or SLP Toolkit)

-Specialized Articulation or Phonology Data Sheets to track progress. Here is my FREE Articulation Data Sheet template. If you need more specialized sheets, you can grab them HERE

– Visual Supports to help with articulation production or to increase self-awareness. You can add speech sound cue cards from Bjorem Speech in the envelope file pouch. 

-Data graphs or self-awareness visuals can be helpful to incorporate into a session. Grab some FREE articulation carryover visuals by clicking the button below.

– Word lists or materials to use for quick drill practice, like these free flash card lists for older developing sounds or my Articulation Flipbooks. Sometimes I will print up pages from my Any Craft Companion Pack and store in the speech folder. 

Homework forms that help track if the student is practicing at home. I use these ones from Kiwi Speech (FREE printable). For your students that you are creating home programs, you can have homework sheets in this folder ahead of time, so you can easily plan and track homework assignments. This is a free homework sheet once students get to the carryover level in my STORE

These FREE Articulation Homework Word List Strips by Simply Speech can be in your students folder. You can customize the word lists based on your students performance during the session and send home.

Other Helpful Forms to Include in Your Speech Folders

If you like to have an individual folder for each student, here are some forms that will help you keep things organized for each student:

FREE SLP Attendance Form by Natalie Synders

Communication Log (FREE) in Sublime Speech’s Starter Kit to document interactions with the child’s parent or teacher

Please share any other forms, visuals, or tools you would add to your articulation speech folders in the comments! You can also tag me on instagram @thedabblingspeechie with your articulation speech folder setup.

Blog Posts To Help You Plan Articulation Therapy

As busy SLPs, it is easy to struggle with ideas on how to increase repetitions or keep your students motivated with articulation practice. Here are some blog posts with ideas to make your articulation therapy productive and fun:

Articulation Stations – Therapy Ideas to Keep Students Motivated

Articulation Stations – Therapy Ideas to Keep Students Motivated

Raise your hand if you have students working on articulation in your therapy room! I think most SLPs can agree that we have a lot of those students either in a speech improvement program or on an IEP. It can be so tricky to help our articulation students make generalization progress when they are in a mixed group. One way to tackle those mixed groups is by planning an activity around all the goals. Or, you can set up station time for students. You can give your articulation students an independent activity to complete for 10-15 minutes while you provide direct instruction to the other kids in the group. And then, the kids switch.
If you are lucky to have a pure artic/phonology group, you can plan 5-10 minute station activities that your students can rotate through during the session. One of the stations can be working directly with you! This is when you can take data, check self-awareness, and get those high productions in the session.

Handy Tools and Items for Your Articulation Stations

Ultra Fine Dry Erase Markers – These are my MOST favorite and used dry erase markers (Amazon affiliate link) for any activity that has a page protector or that is a laminated resource.  Timer – Your smartphone will do just fine, but if you want something more visual, then I recommend a Time Timer or Time Tracker (Amazon affiliate links).   Clickers – For some activity stations, having a digital clicker (Amazon affiliate link) can keep kids motivated and get the higher productions that you want! 
Foam Die – This is great for kids rolling the die (Amazon affiliate link) to see how many productions they have to produce.  Magnetic Chips and Wand – These are  great tools to help kids stay motivated to keep practicing, because they can put a chip on the picture they practiced. This lets the student know how many more are left. And, my students love picking up the chips with the magnetic wand. Mini erasers, Dinky Doodad Trinkets, dot markers, or small edibles, like Skittles, are other materials to help keep kids motivated to practice.

Teaching Behavioral Expectations and Routines

In order to be successful with stations, you have to put a heavy focus on teaching the behavioral expectations and routines. Those first couple of weeks, implementing stations will be about setting the routines. If you need more information about how to set up and teach behavioral routines, then check out this blog post HERE. That said, you may know which groups might not be ready to follow a station model due to behaviors and attention spans. 

Implementing Articulation Stations in Your Therapy Room

The key to a successful articulation station is teaching the behavioral expectations and having an engaging activity. You can have the independent stations have the activities that might not get high repetitions but engage the students in thinking. Then, when the students switch to your station, you can ramp up the drill-and-kill.

Here are some therapy ideas that will help you plan effective articulation station activities:

Pipe Cleaner Articulation Station – Grab some pipe cleaners and plastic beads to have students practice their articulation words at the word, phrase, or sentence level. If you need some premade task cards for R, grab this set in my store. I also have K, G, F, V task cards.
“I Spy” Articulation Sensory Bin – You can make an “I Spy” sensory bin that can be used for articulation (it can also be used for language). Give your students an articulation mat for their sound and have them search for mini trinkets that have their speech sound. Want these mats? They are free on this blog post. Plus, all the details for how to make this interactive sensory bin are on that post. 
Articulation Letter Dough Stamps – I found these Letter Dough Stamps (link?) at Lakeshore and had to have them. You can work on spelling while your students are practicing their articulation words with play dough or kinetic sand. Check out this blog post to read more about how to make this DIY therapy activity.

Articulation Centers That Will Increase Speech Productions

Articulation Challenge – Grab your timer, a clicker, and a word list to make this articulation station. Your student sets the timer for one minute and then uses the clicker to keep track of how many productions he/she can do in that time. Then, they can set the timer again and try to beat their score. If you have two students at the station, then one student can judge productions using the Self-Rating Scale from Speechy Musings (link?) or the rating scales from my Articulation Carryover Activities Set that you can download by clicking the pink button below. 

Need some word lists? Here is a FREE download for /s, z, sh, ch, th/. I also have /r/ flashcards, as well as phonology flashcards in my TpT store. 

Abacus Articulation Station – You can buy an Abacus (Amazon affiliate link) or make your own abacus HERE to help kids stay focused on producing their sounds. Give them a word list or picture cards and have them slide a bead across for every syllable, word, or sentence production.

 

Articulation Flashcard Books – have your students make their own flashcard books with this FREE template. Grab your artic decks, or give them index cards to draw or write their speech words. As they practice the cards, they can sort which ones they said correctly and which ones they need to practice again. This helps build self-awareness for correct versus incorrect sound productions. 

Race to 100 Station – Print up a word list or use picture words while your students play Race to 100. Whatever the die lands on, that is how many words your student has to practice. Grab this free printable and see more pics in action HERE. Mommy Speech Therapy has FREE colored picture word lists for this station. 

Articulation Flip Books – Use my articulation flip books as a station. They are designed for different levels, and students can hit a lot of productions. My students love using a dry erase marker. The flip books are predictable, so the kids stay focused and on- task. Grab these flip books HERE

Sentence Level Articulation Stations for Therapy

 Students at the sentence level can still do an articulation challenge with repetitive sentences. If you need articulation resources for the sentence level, here are some that I created:

Sentence Articulation Challenge Sheets (No Prep). Click to grab these!

No Prep Articulation Sentence Practice.  Click to grab these!

 

Use Articulation Apps as An Articulation Station

iPad Articulation Station – If you own an iPad, or if your district gives you one, then using some interactive articulation apps as a station is a great option.

Here are some that I really like:

Articulation Station or Little Stories by Little Bee Speech

Any of the Articulation Apps by Erik Raj

Articulation Scenes by Smarty Ears

What Articulation Activities Can You Turn into a Station?

 

What activities do you already have prepped that you can turn into an articulation station? I would love to know any quick artic activities you use with your students. I am always looking for ways to motivate my students to practice. Share in the comments below. 

10 Speech Therapy Websites That Will Help Busy SLPs

10 Speech Therapy Websites That Will Help Busy SLPs

Having the right speech therapy resources for the busy SLP is important. When we have the tools we need, SLPs can serve students better and more efficiently. I know my lesson planning is a lot easier because of the speech therapy resources I have found over the years. Slowly, I have been able to build my stash of helpful therapy tools. The advancements with technology have really opened the doors for helping SLPs have access to speech therapy resources they need. Back when I was first starting out in the field in 2007, there was no Pinterest. And blogs, YouTube, and Teachers Pay Teachers were just starting out, so I had no idea about these resources. 

Using Online Resources Can Help You Streamline Caseload Management

Having access to so many websites has been such a blessing for me as an SLP. The job will always be hard, but I have found some websites that I use over and over again to help me be successful as an SLP. Today, I want to share 10 websites that help busy SLPs be more effective with their jobs.

FREE Speech Therapy Websites That Help SLPS

  1. YouTube is one of my most utilized speech therapy resources. I love that it is free, and new content is always being added. YouTube allows me to plan no prep/low prep therapy and to cover a lot of different goals. Here are some of my favoriteYouTube channels.
    • Simon’s Cat Videos – Check out this blog post to see how you can use this channel in therapy. 
    • SciShowKids – Need a YouTube channel that has LOTS of non-fiction videos that are about five minutes in length or less? There are so many great non-fiction videos to access. I have used her BEE videos in this blog post HERE
    • GoNoodle – For your wiggly students, movement brain break videos are awesome! I utilize these videos when teaching my push-in lessons for my SDC K-2 classes. 
    • Storyline Online – This is a channel that has celebrities read popular children’s books out loud. When you don’t have time to hit the library or want to use a certain book, head to YouTube. There are lots of read-aloud books on there. 

More FREE Speech Therapy Websites

Other videos that I love to use are wordless short videos, commercials, and TV/movie video clips. What YouTube channels do you love using with students?

2.  ReadWorks is a free website providing fiction and non-fiction reading passages by grade level. It will read a passage to a student and also includes pre-picked vocabulary that you can target in the passage. You can also get comprehension questions with answer choices for each passage. 

3. EdPuzzle is a free website that allows educators to add questions to videos. You can create multiple choice questions or open-ended questions that will pause the video in the moment when you want to ask a question. I use this for wh- questions, inferencing, and vocabulary. 

4. VocabGrabber – Research continues to show that teaching students Tier II vocabulary words will help them grow their vocabulary skills. So, I love using this free website to get the Tier II vocabulary from textbook passages, fictional books,  and non-fiction passages. 

Speech Therapy Resources with Paid Subscription Websites

5. Everyday Speech – If you have students with social pragmatic disorders who are in upper elementary school and middle school, then you will LOVE Everyday Speech’s Video Library. They have over 100 videos with worksheets included for different social skill concepts you are teaching your students. Video Modeling is an evidence-based practice for children with Autism, and these video lessons are formatted that way. My social skills push-in lesson planning was a breeze using this subscription. I never felt out of ideas and always had a good video to show. You can read more about this speech therapy resource HERE

6. The Informed SLP – SLPs are super busy. After a long day of conducting therapy and paperwork, we just don’t have the brain space or energy to stay up-to-date with the latest research articles on a monthly basis. I want the research info, but I need it in the “Cliff Notes” version so I can efficiently figure out how to apply the research to my students. Then, The Informed SLP came along, and I became a customer. Every month, the team at The Informed SLP shares reviews of the most relevant research articles. You can read the articles on your lunch break or listen in the car. I love that I don’t feel overwhelmed after I read an article and can digest the contents in friendly spans of time.

Use A Subscription That Will Help You Make Informed Clinical Decisions

The Informed SLP is now offering CEU courses that you can listen to in the car, on a walk, when you are cooking dinner or working out at the gym! You can also listen to the article reviews in the same fashion. This membership has helped build my clinical confidence and a big reason I am an affiliate for this subscription. Click the picture above and use the code: FELICE to get 20% off your yearly subscription (This 20% discount is only available for subscriptions).

Speech Therapy Websites with FREE and PAID Resources

8.  Teachers Pay Teachers – When I found this speech therapy resource, I was over the moon. It had FREE lessons and affordable therapy tools that I could literally buy and use within minutes of purchasing. When my district agreed to pay for my Super Duper orders, it took like 2-3 months to actually get the materials. Even if you don’t buy anything on the site, there are TONS of valuable FREE resources. Check out the ones in my store HERE

9. Speech Therapy Resource Libraries on Blogs – Did you know that a lot of SLP bloggers have FREE resource libraries for their newsletter communities? You join their weekly or monthly newsletter and get access to speech therapy goodies that you can’t find anywhere else. If you need a good speech report template, visual supports, articulation carryover activities, and more, then join mine HERE. Some of my favorite free libraries are from Speechy Musings and The Speech Bubble SLP

10. Home Speech Home  has some of the most thorough word lists on the web that are FREE. When I need to come up with some words for language or articulation, I usually go there! They also have paid apps and resources on their site. 

Bonus Speech Therapy Websites for Caseload Management

I know this post has 10 speech therapy websites for SLPs, but it is hard to just recommend ten websites when there are a lot of helpful tools you can access on the internet. If you are looking for some caseload management tools, I recommend trying SLPToolKit. I did a review a few years ago HERE, but since that time, the company has made a ton of updates to help streamline caseload management.

SLPs that want to digitally have access to goals (you can save your goals or they have tools to help you create), have present level assessments and progress monitoring tools digitally, then this website subscription is for you!

Those of you that struggle with managing all the goals your students are working on may benefit from the Swivel Scheduler. It allows you to set-up your speech schedule with your students goals. Then, you can print your schedule each week and it will automatically “swivel” your students goals, so you know exactly what you need to plan and target in a session!

Need More Caseload Management Tips?

One way that I utilize speech therapy websites is by streamlining systems. The first week back at work is when I get my caseload organized. You can see my tips HERE. I also used SLPtoolkit and TPT to help me make processes for my progress monitoring. I wrote a post with all my helpful tips HERE. I am not sure if Google Drive is considered a website, but this has been such a game changer for saving me time and re-inventing the wheel. Check out how Google Forms can help streamline your referral process HERE. This online tool has also helped me stay organized with report writing. You can grab my FREE report template HERE. I store all my templates in Google Drive now!

What Websites Have Helped You SLP?

I would love to know what speech therapy resources have been helpful for you. Please share any websites that you use on a regular basis in the comments or email me at feliceclark@thedabblingspeechie.com.
Using bubbles in speech therapy

Using bubbles in speech therapy

When it comes to childhood memories, I remember spending many afternoons playing with bubbles. There is just something magical about bubbles that kids enjoy. Bubbles are one of those toys that are great to bring out on a spring or summer day. There are so many great ways SLPs can use bubbles in speech therapy.

Bubbles are also near to my heart because they are affordable for SLPs on a budget! This post is filled with all the ways you can utilize bubbles in your speech room. 

Where Can You Buy Bubbles for Your Speech Room?

 

Buy them on Amazon. If you want containers that are no spill, then here are mini ones (Amazon affiliate link) that hold two ounces of bubbles. Or, you can get a bigger container from Fubbles (Amazon affiliate link) that allows you to have multiple wands in the container. Walmart and Target are always my local go-tos for finding bubbles.

If you are the adventurous DIY SLP, then here is a recipe for how to make GIANT bubbles. Here is another recipe for homemade bubbles. Did you know that you can also make DIY wands with pipe cleaners (Amazon affiliate link)?

It is super esy, and it’s an affordable way to have extra wands on hand for your mixed groups. 

Using Bubbles in Speech Therapy With Preschool Children

Bubbles can be used to target so many skills! Listed below are some of my favorite ways to utilize bubbles.

 

  1. Turn-taking and waiting: Students can practice basic social skill requests and comments while playing with the bubbles.
  2. Play following directions Simon Says: Work on using basic concepts or multi-step directions with bubbles, such as, “Clap your hands and then blow a bubble.”
  3. Use as a reinforcer:  The student has to practice target stimulus items and then gets a chance to blow bubbles.
  4. Describe bubbles by attributes.
  5. Make your own wands as a cooperative lesson for ? in the group, being flexible and engaging with peers.

More Ideas for Using Bubbles With Preschoolers

  1. Tape different cards on the wall: Students can say their word or use a carrier phrase with which picture they want to blow the bubbles near. Have students try to blow the bubbles above or below the cards.
  2. Make your own bubbles with your students: Work on sequencing the steps for making the bubbles. Ask your students wh- questions about the process and have them share their opinions about homemade bubbles versus store-bought bubbles.
  3. Answer and teach simple “Who” questions: Who has the wand? Who is popping the bubbles?
  1. Play Red Light, Green Light with bubbles to teach CORE vocabulary for “stop” and “go.”
  2. Build sentence structures:  The bubble is floating in the sky. The bubbles are under the table.
  3. Bubbles are a great tool for joint attention and teaching cause and effect. Withhold the bubbles or the wand until the student gives you joint attention.

Have A Cheat Sheet With Skills You Can Target With Bubbles

Bubbles can be used as a play-based therapy tool to target all sorts of verbs, language skills, and articulation/phonology. It can be tough to remember all the targets to hit in a mixed group. That’s why I created cheat sheets to help SLPs. You focus on the therapy with the students rather than worrying about the targets you are going to use in the session. Need toy companion cheat sheets? Grab my toy companion cheat sheets designed for Pre-K thru 2nd grade for 14 of your students favorite toys. 

Using Bubbles in Speech Therapy with Older Children

Bubbles can be used with your upper elementary and middle school/high school students as a STEM project or science experiment. You can have your students make DIY bubble wands. They can make predictions about which “wand” will make the best bubbles. Check out this post from Natalie Snyders for more details. 

How Do You Use Bubbles in Speech Therapy?

 

Do you have a fun way to engage your students with bubbles in speech therapy? Share in the comments, tag me on instagram @thedabblingspeechie, or email me at feliceclark@thedabblingspeechie.com.

Farm Themed Speech Therapy Toys & Materials

Farm Themed Speech Therapy Toys & Materials

Planning therapy around themes can make it a lot easier to come up with ways to cover all the goals in your mixed groups. And if you have a large caseload, finding ways to use one set of materials for a wide range of goals will make servicing your caseload much more manageable.

Farm-Themed Speech Therapy Materials to Cover Goals in Mixed Groups

How many goals could you cover with this farmhouse toy (Amazon affiliate link)? If you had a mixed group with a student working on reducing the phonological process of fronting, a student working on verb + ing and another student working on following directions, you could cover all those goals with this farmhouse!

For fronting, you could have the student say, “Go _____” with the animals or, “I can see _______” during play. To target “verb +ing,” the students can talk about what the animals are doing. For example, the pig can roll in the mud, the cow can eat grass, and the horse can jump over the fence. Use the animals and farm items to work on basic concepts and following directions. And just like that, your therapy session is planned and that easy to adapt!

Do you need a cheat sheet that would help you remember all the target verbs, questions, vocabulary and activities to do with a farm house? Grab my Toy Companion Speech & Language Cheat Sheets and always feel prepared doing play-based therapy. 

Build Your Personal Material Stash

When I find toys that can be adapted for a lot of ages and skills, it usually becomes part of my personal therapy stash. If I ever move sites or school districts, I want to be able to take the materials that I use all the time with me.

Another toy I use often is my Mr. Potato Head. Check out this post here to see how you can use this toy in therapy. If you need more toy ideas, this post covers some of my most used toys to work on functional language that you can read here.

This post contains Amazon affiliate links for your convenience.

Using a Farmhouse in Speech Therapy

Use a farmhouse to work on all sorts of goals! Here are some goals/skills you can target with this one toy:

—Turn taking and waiting.

—Initiating requests and comments. You can also work on joint attention by withholding objects until you get some eye contact and joint referencing.

—Teach prepositions such as in, out, next to, behind, in front.

—Work on verbs such as eat, sleep, run, jump, laugh, feed, play, roll, sit, gallop, drink.

—Answer wh-questions about the animals and farm equipment.

—Describe the farm animals by attributes.

—Create a story working on sequencing, story elements, and grammar structures.

Finding a farmhouse toy that is affordable can be tricky for SLPs on a budget. You can always try Facebook Marketplace and thrift stores for a deal. If you can’t wait, Amazon or Target have farmhouses.

Favorite Farm-Themed Books for Speech Therapy

I love bringing literacy into my sessions. The books have such colorful pictures, so I often use those to help stimulate language. Of course, you can work on story retell and oral narration with farm books, but you can also target grammar concepts, vocabulary, perspective taking (social skills), and articulation/phonology with words from the story.

Here are some of my favorite farm-themed books:

Mrs. Wishy Washy’s Farm by Joy Cowley

Big Red Barn by Margaret Wise Brown

No Sleep for the Sheep by Karen Beaumont

Little Blue Truck by Alice Schertle

If you don’t have time to head to the library or your Amazon purchase hasn’t arrived yet, you can still use books in therapy. Search for book read-alouds on YouTube like Down on the Farm by Merrily Kutner.

Farm-Themed Toys for Speech Therapy

Use the Create-A-Scene for the farm (Amazon affiliate link) to work on simple story telling, practice verb +ing, following directions, describing nouns by attributes and answering wh-questions.

You can use the farm animals from Learning Resources to work on lots of skills in therapy. Here are some ways you can use these farm animal figurines: target more/less, plural noun markers, describing the animals, sorting the animals by features (i.e. two legs, tail, four legs, color), CORE vocabulary go/stop and as a reinforcement toy for completing other skills.

I love this puzzle to work on farm-themed speech therapy goals from Melissa & Doug. You can work on word opposites open/close as well as lots of CORE vocabulary such as more, look, what, want, turn, and like/don’t like.

Melissa & Doug also have these affordable farm-themed reusable stickers that come with farm picture scenes. This can be a great way to work on grammar concepts, following directions, and story retell. You can also create mini stories and then work on answering wh-questions for those stories!

Farm-Themed YouTube Videos for Easy Therapy Planning

When I just don’t have a ton of time to plan extensive therapy, I turn to YouTube to help me with planning simple, yet effective lessons. I will use farm-themed YouTube videos to target goals for language.

Here are some farm-related YouTube videos you can use:

4 Reasons Why Cows are Awesome by Scishowkids

Chickens! What, Where, How by AnimalWonders Montana

Fun Farm Animal Facts for Children by Kids Learning Videos

Farm Animal Sounds by Kids Learning Videos is an interactive video to work on what animals sound like. The kids love it!

Some farm sensory bin fillers you can use are popcorn kernels or black/brown beans.

Farm-Themed Speech Therapy Materials for Push-In Language Support

 

Wanting to bring farm-themed speech therapy activities into your whole class lessons? Check out my Farm Push-In Activities. They are perfect for busy SLPs wanting to use language activities in small groups and push-in lessons for their K-2 students.

You will have materials completely planned for at least two weeks. I include cheat sheet guides, 3-5 station activities, a Google Slide presentation, as well as a newsletter you can send home to parents. When I started push-in support I wanted to find a quick way I could let parents know what we were working on, in hopes that they would help reinforce the same language at home. I read a research article that found students with language impairments need up to 36 engagements with a word before it is mastered! It gave me permission to do themed therapy for more than one week!

Farm-Themed Speech Therapy Materials You Love

What farm-themed speech therapy materials do you love to use in your sessions? I would love to know what is working for your students. Over the years, I have really grown in learning how to adapt materials just from listening to what other SLPs do in therapy. Please share by leaving a comment or emailing me at feliceclark@thedabblingspeechie.com.